Archive of 2010 Events


January 11, 2010 - Monday

  • War, Fears of Minorities, and Genocide
    Arman Grigoryan, (Manoogian Simone Foundation Post-doctoral Fellow)
    DATE: Monday, January 11th
    TIME: 5:00 PM
    LOCATION: International Institute, room 1636
    SPONSOR: Armenian Studies Program

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January 12, 2010 - Tuesday

  • Symposium Opening Lecture
    MLK Symposium 2010
    SPEAKER: Carmen VanKerchove, Leading Voice on Race & Racism
    DATE: Tuesday, January 12th
    TIME: 5:00 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan League, Vandenberg Room
    SPONSOR: MLK Symposium Planning Committee

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January 17, 2010 - Sunday

  • Voices of the Holocaust (Recital)
    Caroline Helton & Kathryn Goodson, University of Michigan
    DATE: Sunday, January 17th
    TIME: 4:00 PM
    LOCATION: Kerrytown Concert House, 415 North 4th Avenue, Ann Arbor
    SPONSOR: Jean & Samuel Frankel Center for Judaic Studies

    Kathryn Goodson and Caroline Helton performed this program live on Chicago's classical music radio station WFMT in January of 2008, and it was so well-received that parts of it were re-broadcast on a "Best of 2008" program compiled by the sponsor of the broadcast, the Pianoforte Salon Series. The CD of the program, recorded on the Block M label, will be available through the iTunes music store in early 2010.
    The composers on this program, "Voices of the Holocaust," represent Jews from across the spectrum of observance—Kurt Weill, Robert Kahn, Erich Korngold, Darius Milhaud, and Oskar Morawetz—who, because of the Nazi program of systematic persecution of all Jews, were turned into a monolithic, generic, and stereotyped mass. It was no longer possible for them to be both German and Jewish, and in this way the Nazis silenced some of the most gifted voices in the artistic world. These composers' stories are as unique as their compositions, and some have gone largely unheard due to the success of the Nazi suppression. For example, Robert Kahn wrote over 200 songs, but since he was no longer allowed to publish his music after 1933, these songs as well as his other compositions languish in obscurity, most not even available in the U.S. This program seeks to tell the stories of these individuals and let their unique voices be heard.

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January 18, 2010 - Monday

  • Annual Children & Youth Program: A Day Filled With Creativity, Dialogue and Entertainment for Students in Grades K-12
    MLK Symposium 2010
    DATE: Monday, January 18th
    TIME: 8:30 AM - 3:00 PM
    LOCATION: U-M Campus, Modern Language Building (MLB)
    SPONSORS: School of Education, School of Social Work, and Office of Academic Multicultural Initiatives
  • Keynote Memorial Lecture
    MLK Symposium 2010
    Speaker: Gwen Ifill, moderator and managing editor of PBS's "Washington Week," co-anchor for the "PBS NewsHour" and author of the best-selling book: The Breakthrough: Politics and Race in the Age of Obama.
    DATE: Monday, January 18th
    TIME: 10:00 AM
    LOCATION: Hill Auditorium
    SPONSORS: MLK Symposium Planning Committee and Ross School of Business
  • Exploring Global Connections: Celebrating Differences and Similarities
    Business & Finance MLK Convocation
    KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Mark Johnson, creator of Playing for Change.
    Reception to Follow.
    DATE: Monday, January 18th
    TIME: 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: Rackham Auditorium
    SPONSOR: Business & Finance
  • Push, Literacy, Women, and African American Literature
    MLK Symposium 2010
    SPEAKER: Sapphire
    This event is free and open to the public.
    DATE: Monday, January 18th
    TIME: 2:00 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan Union Ballroom
    SPONSOR: University Library
    COSPONSORS: Office of Academic Multicultural Initiatives, University Housing, Bentley Historical Library, Law Library, and the School of Information

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January 20, 2010 - Wednesday

  • Leadership in the Soviet Republics: Nationalism and the Collapse of the USSR
    DATE: Wednesday, January 20th
    TIME: 12 Noon - 1:30 PM
    LOCATION: School of Social Work Building (1636)
    SPONSOR: Center for Russian and East European Studies Description: Jeremy R. Smith, visiting associate professor of history, U-M; and senior lecturer in Russian history and director of doctoral research, School of Government and Society, University of Birmingham, UK
  • Spectres of Forgiveness
    Linda Biehl and Ntobeko Peni of the Amy Biehl Foundation
    DATE: Wednesday, January 20th
    TIME: 1:00 - 2:00 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan League, Koessler Room
    Description: Yazier Henry of the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy and the Center for Afro-American and African Studies (CAAS) will present as part of a week-long conference hosted by the student organization, Ubuntu Alliance. The conference coincides with the University's Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Symposium and is called 'Examining Ubuntu: an African Lens on Community, Reconciliation, and Human Rights.'
  • Women's Health Careers Panel
    Sallie Foley, Timothy Johnson, Lori Lamerand, and Carolyn
    DATE: Wednesday, January 20th
    TIME: 3:30 - 5:00 PM
    LOCATION: 2239 Lane Hall
    SPONSOR: Senior Leadership in Women’s Health
  • "Are High-Quality Schools Enough to Close the Achievement Gap? Evidence from a Bold Social Experiment in Harlem"
    SPEAKER: Roland Fryer, Robert M. Beren Professor of Economics at Harvard University, Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and CEO of the Education Innovation Laboratory at Harvard University.
    DATE: Wednesday, January 20th
    TIME: 4:00 - 5:30 PM
    Free and open to the public.
    LOCATION: Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, Betty Ford Classroom, 1110 Joan and Sanford Weill Hall, 735 South State Street, Ann Arbor
    SPONSORS: Education Policy Initiative (EPI) at the Center for Local, State, and Urban Policy (CLOSUP) and the Gerald R. FordSchool of Public Policy.
    EPI is a program of coordinated activities designed to bring the latest academic knowledge to issues of education policy.
    For more information: visit www.closup.umich.edu or call 734-647-4091
  • SCOR: Academic Empowerment Series Session 1 (ongoing)
    DATE: Wednesday, January 20th
    TIME: 7:00 - 8:00 PM
    LOCATION: Rackham 4th Floor
    Description: Join SCOR for free food and academic growth! Not only can you enhance your research and education by attending and participating in the SCOR Conference (Feb. 12-13, 2010), you can also do so by attending the Academic Empowerment Series. This series of seminars and workshops introduces you to more resources at Michigan and prepares you for your future success.

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January 21, 2010 - Thursday

  • On Reading Art: Text, Image and Interpretation in Early Modern Ashkenaz
    Naomi Feuchtwanger-Sarig, Tel Aviv University
    DATE: Thursday, January 21st
    TIME: 12 Noon (moved from Jan. 14, 2010--please note date change)
    LOCATION: 202 South Thayer St., Room 2022
    SPONSOR: Jean & Samuel Frankel Center for Judaic Studies

    A late sixteenth-century manuscript from southern Germany will serve as an example of reading art while unveiling the various layers of interpretation, its iconographic detail revealing the cultural milieu of the artist—his "library" and literary heritage and the extent to which he responded to contemporary, non-Jewish culture. Naomi Feuchtwanger-Sarig is an art-historian by training, specializing in cultural history of the Jews in the German-speaking realm from the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period. She is Project Coordinator of the Jewish Art and Visual Culture Research Project at the Goldstein-Goren Diaspora Research Center, and Assistant Professor at the Art History Department at Tel Aviv University.
  • International Day
    DATE: Thursday, January 21st
    TIME: 1:00 - 2:30 PM
    LOCATION: Westminster Presbyterian Church, Ann Arbor, MI (Room: Fellowship Hall)
    SPONSOR: International Center
    Description: The women of International Neighbors offer friendship and understanding to women who have come to the Ann Arbor area from other countries. International Neighbors is a non-profit organization operated by volunteers since 1958. Membership has grown to almost 900 women who represent more than 60 countries. They offer a variety of interesting activities that make it possible for women to share their cultures and learn from each other. International Day is a monthly gathering for all women. Socializing, refreshments and special programs give women an opportunity to share their cultures and gain a deeper insight into American life. Transportation and childcare are provided if needed. This event is a collaboration of the International Center and International Neighbors.

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January 22, 2010 - Friday

  • Isaac Bashevis Singer and the Yiddish Difference, or: Why Yentl Sings
    Anita Norich, University of Michigan
    DATE: Friday, January 22nd
    TIME: 12 Noon
    LOCATION: 202 South Thayer St., Room 2022
    SPONSOR: Jean & Samuel Frankel Center for Judaic Studies

    This talk considers translations of Isaac Bashevis Singer's now-canonical fiction. In the differences between a number of his Yiddish stories and their English translations (as well as the differences made famous by Barbra Streisand's movie), we discern some of the shifts in Jewish culture in America, in the myths and realities of Yiddish culture, and in translation theory. English, in this analysis, emerges as the more protective, reverential, and apologetic language of Jewish cultural expression, while Yiddish reveals its willingness to challenge conventional norms about fiction, as well as about individual identity, sexuality, tradition, community.

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January 25, 2010 - Monday

  • The Future of Gay Men's Health and the Politics of Medical Truth
    DATE: Monday, January 25th
    TIME: 3:00 - 7:00 PM
    LOCATION: 1840 SSWB (Educational Conference Center)
    SPONSORS: Institute for Research on Women and Gender, Department of Sociology, School of Social Work, School of Public Health, Spectrum Center, and the University of Michigan Health System
    Description: Panel discussants: Robert M. Grant (Medicine, UC San Francisco), An Epidemic of 'Risk.' Héctor Carrillo (Sociology and Gender Studies, Northwestern), Queer Migrations and the Contexts of HIV Risk: Mexican Gay Men and their Sexual Interactions in the United States. Steven Epstein (Sociology, Northwestern), Discussing the Undiscussable: Queer Biocitizenship and the Gender and Sexual Politics of Anal Cancer.
  • Perspectives on the Origin of Armenian Language and Culture
    Hrach Martirosyan, (Manoogian Simone Foundation Post-doctoral Fellow, Netherlands/Armenia)
    DATE: Monday, January 25th
    TIME: 5:00 PM
    LOCATION: International Institute, room 1636
    SPONSOR: Armenian Studies Program

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January 26, 2010 - Tuesday

  • Lecture: Modeling Early Chinese Medicine: Reflections on the Relationship Between Law and Science
    Carmita Vaughan
    DATE: Tuesday, January 26th
    TIME: 12 Noon - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: Dorothy L. and Harry E. Chesebrough Auditorium Chrysler Center for Continuing Engineering Education
    SPONSOR: Center for Chinese Studies Description: This is an investigation of the relationship between law and science in China. Speaker Miranda Brown is associate professor of early Chinese culture in the Department of Asian Languages and Culture.
  • MLK Event: Engineering Change
    Carmita Vaughan
    DATE: Tuesday, January 26th
    TIME: 3:00 - 4:00 PM
    LOCATION: Dorothy L. and Harry E. Chesebrough Auditorium Chrysler Center for Continuing Engineering Education
    Description: There will be a reception following the event.

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January 27, 2010 - Wednesday

  • Brownbag Lecture: Russian Silences: The Venetsianov School of Painting (1820-50) and the Ecology of Perception
    Thomas Newlin, associate professor of Russian language and literature, Oberlin College
    DATE: Wednesday, January 27th
    TIME: 12 Noon - 1:30 PM
    LOCATION: School of Social Work Building, Room 1636
    SPONSOR: Center for Russian and East European Studies (CREES)
    CONTACT: rnlow@umich.edu
  • The Experience of Innumerable Minds: Diversity in Policy Making
    Scott E. Page, Professor of Complex Systems, Political Science and Economics and the Director of the Center for the Study of Complex Systems at the University of Michigan
    DATE: Wednesday, January 27th
    TIME: 4:00 - 5:30 PM
    LOCATION: Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, Annenberg Auditorium, 1120 Weill Hall, 735 S. State Street, Ann Arbor
    SPONSORS: Center for Public Policy in Diverse Societies and the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy
    Hosted as part of the University of Michigan's 2010 Reverend Doctor Martin Luther King, Jr. Symposium

    Ralph Waldo Emerson wrote that "our knowledge is the amassed thought and experience of innumerable minds." That insight rings especially true in the context of policy making, where diverse thoughts, experiences, beliefs and models prove critical to the process of constructing good policy. As policy problems grow more difficult and as the coupling of policy interactions produces greater complexity, the benefits of diversity become even more pronounced, provided that we agree on fundamental ends.
  • Lecture: Korean Kayagum Sanjo: Schools and Players
    Center for Korean Studies Distinguished Korean Studies Lecture Series
    DATE: Wednesday, January 27th
    TIME: 12 Noon - 1:30 PM
    LOCATION: School of Social Work Building, Room 1636
    SPONSOR: Korean Foundation
    CONTACT: rnlow@umich.edu
  • I Have a Dream, Tengo un Sueno, Nd'bwaajige
    Join us to discuss past and present political struggles in African American, Latina/o and Native American Communities.
    • An Introduction by:
      Dr. John Matlock, Director of The Office of Academic Multicultural Initiatives
    • Remembering Dr. Martin Luther King by Dr. Charles Taylor, Comprehensive Studies
    • Linking our Struggles by Dr. Maria Cotera, Director Latina/o Studies Program
      and Cultura No Olvidada: A Culture Not Forgotten by Marilyn Somoza, CSP Advising
    • Native Women Today by Lois Beardslee, author of The Women's Warrior Society
    Pizza and snacks will be served. Music by a local hand drum group and The University of Michigan Gospel Chorale.
    DATE: Wednesday, January 27th
    TIME: 5:30 - 7:30 PM
    LOCATION: School of Social Work Meeting Room
    SPONSORS: Sponsored by School of Social Work, The Office of Academic Multicultural Initiatives, Multi-Ethnic Student Affairs, Comprehensive Studies Program, and Newman LSA Academic Advising Center

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January 28, 2010 - Thursday

  • Rite of Passing: (Ex)change of Identities between the State and the Subject in Contemporary Orthodox Conversion in Israel
    Michal Kravel-Tovi, Hebrew University
    DATE: Thursday, January 28th
    TIME: 12 Noon
    LOCATION: 202 South Thayer St., Room 2022
    SPONSOR: Jean & Samuel Frankel Center for Judaic Studies
  • False Starts: Native Americans, Representation, and Museums
    Professor Steven Conn, Professor and Director of the Public History Program, Ohio State University
    LECTURE DATE: Thursday, January 28th (see Jan 29 for workshop)
    LECTURE TIME: 4:00 - 6:00 PM
    LOCATION: 1014 Tisch Hall
    SPONSOR: UM Native American Studies Program and the Eisenberg Institute for Historical Studies.
    Description: Steven Conn is author of several books, including Museums and American Intellectual Life, 1876-1926 (2000); History's Shadow: Native Americans and Historical Consciousness in the 19th Century (2004); and most recently Do Museums Still Need Objects? (2010). He is also professor and director of Public History at Ohio State University and editor of the e-journal Origins: Current Events in Historical Perspective. Although Professor Conn has written extensively on topics related to the Eisenburg Institute and College of Literatures, Sciences and the Arts themes for 2009-10, his newest project has nothing to do with them at all. Conn is presently writing a history of anti-urbanism in the 20th century.
  • Motorola Lecture: Combating the Lolita Effect: How the Media Sexualize Young Girls and What We Can Do About It
    Meenakshi Gigi Durham, associate professor of journalism and mass communication at the University of Iowa
    DATE: Thursday, January 28th
    TIME: 7:30 PM
    A reception begins at 6:45 p.m.
    LOCATION: Palmer Commons, 100 Washtenaw Ave.
    The event is free and open to the public.
    SPONSORS: U-M Women's Studies Department, the Institute for Research on Women and Gender, the College of Literature, Science & the Arts, and the Department of Communication Studies
    More information
    The event will feature a panel discussion with Sharon Gold-Steinberg, clinical supervisor, University Center for the Child and the Family; Lore Rogers, staff attorney, Michigan Domestic Violence Prevention and Treatment Board; and Patricia Montemurri, reporter, Detroit Free Press. Durham said sexualization—which refers to the distorted, objectifying, commercially motivated, and often harmful representations of sexuality—proliferates in mainstream media. She says effective strategies can challenge the myths, prompting parents to raise strong, media-literate girls. "We don't want our kids to grow up to be passive media audiences," she said. "We want them to be active, critical media consumers who can make good decisions for themselves as they get older."
    Established in 2001 with support from the Motorola Foundation, the Motorola Lecture aims to expose U-M students to journalists addressing issues concerning women and gender and to engage students about ways the media can reframe public understanding of complex issues.
  • MLK Poetry Slam & Art Competition
    DATE: Thursday, January 28th
    TIME: 8:00 - 11:00 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan Union, Pendleton Room
    SPONSORS: ALPHAS, MESA UCLUB
    Description: In honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Alpha Phi Alpha, Inc. Epsilon Chapter, in conjunction with MESA and UUAP, presents… A Right to Dream: An Art and Poetry Exhibition! This is an art and poetry competition that gives students the chance to win over $500 in prizes. If you have any questions, please email poetryslam@umich.edu! There will also be an open-mic portion for students to freely express themselves, without judgment, in regards to the theme. Doors open at 8:00 PM. Please be sure to get your tickets early because this event is expected to sell out. The cost of this event is $5 and tickets will be available through MUTO. $2 of the $5 will be donated to the construction of MLK Monument in Washington, D.C.
  • Malaysian Movie Night: Talentime
    by Director Yasmin Ahmad
    DATE: Thursday, January 28th
    TIME: 8:00 - 10:00 PM
    LOCATION: Pond Room, Michigan Union
    SPONSOR: Malaysian Student Association
    CONTACT: You Ning Lee youning@umich.edu or Kartikha kartikha@umich.edu
    Talentime is a heartwarming, beautiful movie that shows what it means to be a Malaysian. It deals with interracial issues in a multicultural setting that captures the beauty and the uniqueness of Malaysia. In Talentime, a music teacher, who is herself a great performer is organizing an inter-school talentime. Through the days of auditions, rehearsals and preparations, running up to the big day of the contest, the characters get embroiled in a world of heightened emotions - ambition, jealousy, human comedy, romance, heartbreak - all of which culminate in a day of great music and performances. Director Yasmin Ahmad's film is always full of joy and pain, hope and despair, beautifully-written songs and rich characters.
    FREE Admission, Drinks, Snacks, and T-shirts (limited)!

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January 29, 2010 - Friday

  • Representing Past to the Public Eye
    Steven Conn, Luciana Aenasoaie (PhD student, Anthropology/History), Evelyn Alsultany (American Culture), Chaired by Michelle McClellan (History)
    WORKSHOP DATE: Thursday, January 29th (see Jan 28 for lecture)
    WORKSHOP TIME: 12 Noon - 2:00 PM
    LOCATION: 1014 Tisch Hall
    SPONSOR: UM Native American Studies Program and the Eisenberg Institute for Historical Studies.
    Description: Steven Conn is author of several books, including Museums and American Intellectual Life, 1876-1926 (2000); History's Shadow: Native Americans and Historical Consciousness in the 19th Century (2004); and most recently Do Museums Still Need Objects? (2010). He is also professor and director of Public History at Ohio State University and editor of the e-journal Origins: Current Events in Historical Perspective. Although Professor Conn has written extensively on topics related to the Eisenburg Institute and College of Literatures, Sciences and the Arts themes for 2009-10, his newest project has nothing to do with them at all. Conn is presently writing a history of anti-urbanism in the 20th century.
  • Center for South Asian Studies (CSAS) film series
    Featured Film: TBA
    DATE: Thursday, February 4th
    TIME: 4:00 - 6:00 PM
    LOCATION: International Institute/ SSWB (room 1636)
    SPONSOR: This event is organized by the Graduate Student Programming Committee of the Center for South Asian Studies.
    CONTACT: 734.764.0448 or csas@umich.edu

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January 30, 2010 - Saturday

  • Dem Vietnam Cultural Show
    DATE: Saturday, January 30th
    TIME: 7:00 - 9:00 PM
    LOCATION: Mendelssohn Theatre in the Michigan League
    Description: This event is organized by the Vietnamese Student Association. Come celebrate a night filled with Vietnamese culture.
    Tickets Prices:
    • $5 Presale tickets (bought before January 30)
    • $7 Students at the door
    • $10 General Admission at the door
    *Proceeds from ticket sales are donated to Viet Hope, a non-profit organization that supports education for financially disadvantaged Vietnamese children.
  • Winter 2010 Documentary Film Series:
    24 City
    DATE: Saturday, January 30th
    TIME: 7:10 - 9:00 PM
    LOCATION: Auditorium A, Angell Hall
    Description: The conversion of a state-owned munitions factory into luxury high-rise apartments allows for an acute appreciation of socialism’s impact on the Chinese people, and the complex social changes sweeping the country in this masterful new documentary from Jia Zhangke. Founded in 1958 to produce aviation engines, Factory 420 saw years of prosperous activity. Now abandoned, the factory awaits its destiny. Sold for millions to real estate developers, it will be transformed into an emblem of market economy: a complex of apartment blocks called 24 City. Constructed around eight dramatic interviews, punctuated by snippets of pop songs, poetry and beautifully shot footage of the demolition, 24 City is a mesmerizing exploration of China’s past, present and future. Without nostalgia but with sensitivity and depth of feeling, Mr. Jia is documenting a country and several generations that are disappearing before the world’s eyes — Manohla Dargis, New York Times.

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February 3, 2010 - Wednesday

  • Lecture: Understanding the Roles of Academic Preparation, Financial Resources, and Information in the College Enrollment of Underrepresented Students
    Dr. Laura Perna, Associate Professor of Higher Education, University of Pennsylvania
    DATE: Wednesday, February 3rd
    TIME: 1:30 - 3:00 PM
    LOCATION: Rackham Graduate School, Assembly Hall
    SPONSORS: Center for Educational Outreach (CEO), Projects Promoting Equity in Urban and Higher Education, and National Center for Institutional Diversity (NCID)
    To RSPVVP, please visit www.ceo.umich.edu/speakerseries.html
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    Laura Perna's scholarship uses and integrated theoretical approach and a variety of analytic techniques to understand the ways that public policies, social structures, and individual characteristics separately and together enable and restrict the ability of women, racial/ethnic minorities, and individuals of lower socioeconomic status to obtain the economic, social and political opportunites that are associated with two aspects of higher education: access as a student and employment as a faculty member.

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February 4, 2010 - Thursday

  • Frankel Institute Colloquium: Jews and Rosaries: Intercultural Objects in Contested Spaces
    Judith Goldstein (Vassar College)
    DATE: Thursday, February 4th
    TIME: 12 Noon - 1:30 PM
    LOCATION: 202 South Thayer St.
    SPONSOR: Museums Theme Year
    CONTACT: Carla M Sinopoli, 734 764-0485 or sinopoli@umich.edu
  • Does India Have History? Does History Have India?
    Tom Trautmann
    DATE: Thursday, February 4th
    TIME: 4:00 - 6:00 PM
    LOCATION: Tisch Hall (room 1014)
    SPONSOR: Center for South Asian Studies (CSAS)
    Description: This Lecture by U-M history professor Tom Trautmann is presented by the Eisenberg Institute for Historical Studies as part of its Thursday speaker series.

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February 5, 2010 - Friday

  • Honduras and 21st Century Fascism: Have the Masks Come Off?
    Adrienne Pine, Assistant Professor of Anthropology at American University and is also the Senior Research Associate at the Council on Hemispheric Affairs
    DATE: Friday, February 5th
    TIME: 12 Noon - 2:00 PM
    LOCATION: SSWB (International Institute; room 1644)
    SPONSOR: Program in Latin American and Caribbean Studies (LACS)
    Description: Adrienne Pine is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at American University and is also the Senior Research Associate at the Council on Hemispheric Affairs. A militant medical anthropologist, Dr. Pine has done fieldwork in Honduras, Mexico, Korea, the United States, and Egypt. Her book, Working Hard, Drinking Hard: On Violence and Survival in Honduras (UC Press 2008), examines the symbolic violence resulting from Hondurans’ embodied obsession with certain forms of "real" violence as a necessary condition for the acceptance of violent forms of modernity and capitalism. Prior to and following the June 2009 military coup in Honduras, she has collaborated with numerous organizations and individuals, both inside and outside the academy, to bring international attention to the Honduran struggle to halt state violence (in its multiple forms). She blogs at http://quotha.net. In her recent book Working Hard, Drinking Hard: On Violence and Survival in Honduras, Adrienne Pine describes targeted attacks by military and mercenary forces on the poor, government policy answering to the dictates of transnational corporations, assassinated journalists, and rampant corruption. And that was before the June 28th, 2009 military coup. So what has changed since? One answer, a common refrain among Hondurans resisting the repressive policies of the de facto government, is that "the masks have come off." In this talk, Pine approaches the current, perhaps liminal moment of Honduran "unmasking"—in which normally invisible structures and agents of violence have been made manifest—as desubjectivation. If we are to take seriously the claims of those Hondurans that their current government, in contrast to preceding ones, is an illegitimate fascist regime propped up by the United States, we need to re-examine what constitutes fascism, and why social scientists have been so hesitant to apply the label in non-European, non-historical contexts. Based on an analysis of Honduran governance during the past six months, Pine argues that indeed, rather than saving the continent from Hugo Chavez's 21st Century Socialism, the military and corporate backers of the Honduran coup regime have pushed the region toward 21st Century Fascism.

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February 9, 2010 - Tuesday

  • myBROTHERS: A lunch series for self-identified men of color

    DATE: Tuesday, February 9th
    TIME: 11:30 AM - 1:15 PM
    LOCATION: 3909 (MSA Chambers) Michigan Union
    SPONSOR: Spectrum Center
    Description: What does it mean to be a man of color at Michigan? Through reflections and discussion on this complex question, you will have a chance to express your experiences here at U-M and build connections with other brothers on campus. MY BROTHERS is a safe space open to all self-identified men of color at the University of Michigan. Lunch will be served followed by a speaker and small group discussion.

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February 10, 2010 - Wednesday

  • TRANSlating Experience: A brownbag educational and discussion series
    DATE: Wednesday, February 10th and 24th
    TIME: 11:30 AM - 1:30 PM
    LOCATION: 3909 (MSA Chambers) Michigan Union
    SPONSOR: Spectrum Center
    TRANSlating Experience is not Transgender 101. This series is meant to critically engage communities around issues of the transgender experience at the University of Michigan. TRANSlating Experience is not just about being trans, it’s about living, learning, working, dating and celebrating being TRANS. A light lunch will be served. Note: the above uses “TRANS” to encapsulate identities inclusive of those who identify and/or present as gender-queer, gender non-normative, gender variant, non-gendered or transgender. While all are welcome to this series, please note that some topics may require existing comfort, knowledge and fellowship with and around the trans-identified community. This series is not intended to be an introduction to the trans-identified community. This series is not intended to serve as counseling or other types of therapy. Go to the Spectrum Center website for a full list of the topics to be presented by date.
  • Our Bodies, Ourselves: Past, Present and Future
    Judy Norsigian
    DATE: Wednesday, February 10th
    TIME: 3:00 - 4:30 PM
    LOCATION: 2239 Lane Hall
    Judy Norsigian, executive director and a founder of the Boston Women's Health Book Collective, is a co-author of Our Bodies, Ourselves, Our Bodies, Ourselves: Menopause and Our Bodies, Ourselves: Pregnancy and Birth. Judy speaks and writes frequently on a wide range of women's health concerns, including abortion and contraception, sexually transmitted infections, genetics and reproductive technologies, tobacco and women, women and health care reform, and midwifery advocacy. She has appeared on numerous national television and radio programs, including OPRAH, the TODAY show, GOOD MORNING AMERICA, THE EARLY SHOW and NBC Nightly News with Tom Brokaw. She served on the board of the National Women's Health Network for 14 years and currently serves as a board member for Public Responsibility in Medicine and Research.
  • CAAS Africa Workshop: Alain Kihm
    "Guinea-Bissau Creole: History, Ecology, and Grammar"
    The Africa Workshop series featuring Alain Kihm, Professor Laboratoire de Linguistique Formelle, Paris DATE: Wednesday, February 10th
    TIME: 5:30 - 7:00 PM
    LOCATION: 4701 Haven Hall, CAAS Conference Room
    SPONSOR: Afroamerican and African Studies, Center for (CAAS)
  • A Benefit Event
    In celebration of Black History Month, this joint concert and group art show opening will showcase several visual and performing artists in the region. Proceeds to establish the Pascal J. Hall Memorial Scholarship Fund.
    DATE: Wednesday, February 10th
    TIME: 7:00 PM
    LOCATION: Kerrytown Concert House
    More information, program & reservations
    SPONSOR: Epsilon Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity
    • Art Showcase and Sale: Vertical Speech
      Audience members will have an opportunity to view the artwork beginning at 7:00 PM and following the performance, which begins at 8:00 PM. The exhibit will run through the month of February. Featuring the artwork of local African American artists: Alonzo Edwards, Christopher Batten, Malcolm Rowry, Marcus Wilson, Mario Moore and Rod Gailes.
    • Recital: Black Baritones
      Darnell Ishmel, operatic baritone, in collaboration with pianist Byron Sean, University of Michigan graduates
      TIME: 8:00 PM
      This mixed-media tribute recital will offer a unique examination of the history of the "Black Baritone" as evidenced by the lives and historical contributions of three of America's all-time greatest baritone voices: Todd Duncan, Robert McFerrin and William Warfield.

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February 11, 2010 - Thursday

  • Bearing Witness: Soviet Jewish Photographers Confront World War II & The Holocaust
    David Shneer, UC Boulder
    DATE: Thursday, February 11th
    TIME: 4:00 PM
    LOCATION: 202 South Thayer St., Room 2022
    SPONSOR: Jean & Samuel Frankel Center for Judaic Studies
  • Neoslaveries in the 19th C Atlantic World: A Symposium
    February 11 - February 12, 2010
    PANEL I—Alternative Middle Passages for Africans and South Asians
    The symposium "Neoslaveries in the 19th C Atlantic World" explores the forced migration and indenture of laborers from China, India, and West Africa to the Americas, in the age and aftermath of the Middle Passage. Here four scholars engage the idea of "neoslaveries" to provide a sustained discussion of "other" participants whose destinies were inextricably linked with that of New World blacks in terms of resistance and co-optation. Also, in different ways their papers explore specific modes of representation emerging from the enslavement of blacks, representations which continue to characterize modern-day assessments of non-white immigrant labor in the Americas.
    • Sharla Fett, Department of History, Occidental College "Middle Passages: Liberated Africans and U.S. Government Camps and Ships"
      Sandra Gunning, Department of English and CAAS, University of Michigan "The Deadly Voyage of the Allenshaw: Black Rebellion, Indentureship, and Sex across the Indian and Atlantic Oceans"
      Moderator: Marie Stango, Department of History, University of Michigan
      Respondents: Nesha Haniff, Women's Studies and CAAS, University of Michigan, second respondent TBA
      DATE: Thursday, February 11th
      TIME: 4:00 - 6:00 PM
      LOCATION: CAAS conference room, 4701 Haven Hall

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February 12, 2010 - Friday

  • SCOR: 20th Anniversary Students of Color of Rackham Conference
    DATE: Friday & Saturday, February 12th - 13th
    LOCATION: Rackham 4th Floor
    Join SCOR for their 20th Anniversary. The conference will feature student presentations, amazing guest speakers, students from other universities, FREE food, fun mingling, and MORE!
    CONTACT: cor-eboard@umich.edu
  • Neoslaveries in the 19th C Atlantic World: A Symposium
    February 11 - February 12, 2010
    PANEL II—Alternative Middle Passages for Africans and South Asians
    The symposium "Neoslaveries in the 19th C Atlantic World" explores the forced migration and indenture of laborers from China, India, and West Africa to the Americas, in the age and aftermath of the Middle Passage. Here four scholars engage the idea of "neoslaveries" to provide a sustained discussion of "other" participants whose destinies were inextricably linked with that of New World blacks in terms of resistance and co-optation. Also, in different ways their papers explore specific modes of representation emerging from the enslavement of blacks, representations which continue to characterize modern-day assessments of non-white immigrant labor in the Americas.
    • Thavolia Glymph, Associate Professor of African and African American Studies and History, Duke University will be presenting a talk titled, 'Disappeared Without Any Account Being Had of Them': Enslaved Women and the Armies of the Civil War.
      DATE: Friday, February 11th
      TIME: 12 Noon - 2:00 PM
      LOCATION: CAAS conference room, 4701 Haven Hall
    • Jean Pfaelzer, Department of English and Women's Studies, University of Delaware "Muted Mutinies: Rebellions on Chinese Slave Ships"
      Lisa Yun, Department of English and Asian and Asian American Studies, SUNY Binghamton "Motley Beginnings: Mixed Genealogies of Asian in Slavery and Free"
      Moderator: Sri Nair, Department of English and Women's Studies, University of Michigan
      Respondent: Susan Najita, Department of English and American Culture, A/PIA Studies, second respondent TBA
      DATE: Friday, February 11th
      TIME: 4:00 - 6:00 PM
      LOCATION: 3512 Haven Hall
  • What's It Like To Work at a Postsecondary Minority Institution?
    DATE: Friday, February 12th
    TIME: 3:30 - 5:00 PM
    LOCATION: Assembly Hall, 4th floor, Rackham Building
    What's it like to work at a college or university with a high proportion of underrepresented students? Panelists from Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) will discuss their worklife and hiring advice, from different disciplinary and institutional perspectives. For more information or to register, please visit http://www.crlt.umich.edu/gsis/wil.php
  • Desi Women in the Reel World: "Sancharram -The Journey"
    DATE: Friday, February 12th
    TIME: 4:00 - 6:00 PM
    LOCATION: 1636 International Institute/SSWB
    SPONSOR: Center for South Asian Studies (CSAS)
    Sancharram is an independent feature film by the Chicago-based, diasporic filmmaker Ligy Pullappally. It tells the story of two young women, in the backdrop of an idyllic rendering of Kerala, whose friendship crosses accepted boundaries and enters the realm of the sexual. The familiar world around them fall apart as the two girls come to terms with their romantic love for each other. Sancharram has got critical attention for being a lesbian film that breaks accepted norms of representation. This is a film that raises questions about how regional settings and assumptions about "rural sexuality" travel within transnational networks of reception.
    CONTACT: csas@umich.edu

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February 13, 2010 - Saturday

  • SCOR: 20th Anniversary Students of Color of Rackham Conference
    DATE: Friday & Saturday, February 12th - 13th
    LOCATION: Rackham 4th Floor
    Join SCOR for their 20th Anniversary. The conference will feature student presentations, amazing guest speakers, students from other universities, FREE food, fun mingling, and MORE!
    CONTACT: cor-eboard@umich.edu

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February 14, 2010 - Sunday

  • Chinese New Year Gala
    DATE: Sunday, February 14th
    TIME: 7:30 PM
    LOCATION: Power Center for the Performing Arts
    SPONSOR: Michigan Union Ticket Office (MUTO)
    Celebration of Chinese traditional new year. Adults $5, Children (under 12)/Senior (65+) $3. Service Charges may apply.

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February 15, 2010 - Monday

  • How to Be Gay
    David Halperin
    DATE: Monday, February 15th
    TIME: 4:00 - 5:30 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan Union, Kuenzel Room
    SPONSOR: Women's Studies
    What's the relation between male homosexuality as a sexual practice and male homosexuality as a cultural practice? What explains the cultural object-choices of gay men? What can we find out about gay male subjectivity by studying gay men's cultural preferences instead of their sexual preferences? And what are the sexual meanings of specific cultural forms? That is the topic of David Halperin's new book, How to Be Gay. In this lecture, he will present a few insights from it.
  • Hillel LGBTQ Ally Training

    DATE: Monday, February 15th
    TIME: 6:00 - 9:00 PM
    LOCATION: Hillel, Mandell L Berman Center
    SPONSOR: Hillel
    Hillel will be holding Ally Training for all interested leaders and students. This is a two-part training that explores identity and strengthens your ability to serve as an ally to the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer/questioning (LGBTQ) community at U-M.
    This training is divided into two parts: February 15 and February 22 from 6:00 - 9:00 PM. Both parts must be completed in succession.
    CONTACT: Ryan Garber rygarber@umich.edu
  • Strategizing to Overcome Legal Discrimination in Michigan
    Combating Intolerance in Michigan's Constitution

    Stand up! Speak out!: Strategizing to Overcome Legal Discrimination Against LGBT Families in Michigan
    A discussion featuring renowned Human Rights lawyer Deborah Labelle and Jay Kaplan, staff attorney for the Michigan ACLU LGBT Project.
    DATE: Monday, February 15th
    TIME: 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
    LOCATION: Hutchins Hall, Room 250, University of Michigan Law School, 625 South State St [corner of Monroe St., one block north of Hill St., 2 blocks north of Packard]
    SPONSOR: Spectrum Center, ACLU of Michigan U of M Law School Chapter, ACLU of Michigan Washtenaw Branch, Oasis TBLG Outreach Ministry, Inclusive Justice Program, Equality Now Michigan
    In 2008, the Michigan Supreme Court upheld a lower court's ruling that Proposal 2, passed by Michigan votes in 2004, prohibits public employers from offering domestic partner benefits thereby enshrining legal discrimination into our state law. Our speakers will discuss the pros and cons of the different legal strategies being considered for challenging this injustice.
    This event is free and open to the public. Refreshments provided.
    For further information, visit http://www.aclumich.org/ or call (734) 846-3578

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February 16, 2010 - Tuesday

  • CCS 2010 Noon Lecture Series:
    "Background Beijing Urban House: Qing Shui Yuan and Linked Hybrid as Non-Identical Topological Twins"
    Robert Adams
    DATE: Tuesday, February 16th
    TIME: 12 Noon - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: School of Social Work Building, 1080 South University Room 1636
    SPONSOR: Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)
    Strategically located in Beijing at the Second Ring Road and Airport Expressway is an intricate morphological knot of civic infrastructure and social housing. Elevated above the ground, recently constructed highway space swarms a complex urban situation that is as much physical as it is psychological. In the northeast quadrant is the acrobatic housing project, Linked Hybrid, designed by American architect Steven Holl. To the south is Qing Shui Yuan, a massive urban housing complex constructed in the 1989 by the Fifth Construction Company to house workers of Beijing's Municipal Public Utilities -- the people responsible for the infrastructural management of the city. On one side of the expressway is the desire engine, an architectural spectacle of emerging capital lodging itself in the domestic psyche; while on the other, the civic worker maintains everyday operations of the city. Passing below the elevated expressway are the daily routines of people and labor, while above on the road the money and goods move out. This situation represents a diabolical diagram for early 21st century urbanism in the People's Republic of China, and one that will impact the future of how urban morphology is theorized and practiced throughout the world. Given the robust development of early 21st century urbanism in China, how will the attributes of this massive project be refracted into the world? What is being simultaneously invented by the project of high-speed urbanization in China, and how will this change the way designers conceptualize and open the channels for the urban imaginary?
    Robert Adams is an Assistant Professor in Architecture at Taubman College, and Faculty Associate at Center for Chinese Studies, University of Michigan. Adams is a co-founder of B.A.S.E., Beijing Architecture Studio Enterprise, located in the urban village of Caochangdi in Beijing. His work in China has focused on urban housing, highway infrastructure, and many vivid material practices from architecture to fashion design. Adams' work has been exhibited at the 3rd Architecture Biennial Beijing, Shenzhen University College of Architecture and Urban Planning, and Tianjin University College of Architecture. Together with Dawn Gilpin, he is a principal of Adams + Gilpin, a design studio located in a strip mall in Ann Arbor. Adams current design work focuses on issues of new urban mobility for people with an extreme range of ability.
    CONTACT: 734-764-6308 or chinese.studies@umich.edu

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February 17, 2010 - Wednesday

  • CAAS Brownbag Series
    featuring Marlyse Baptista, Professor of CAAS and Linguistics
    DATE: Wednesday, February 17th
    TIME: 12 Noon - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: 4701 Haven Hall, CAAS Conference Room
    SPONSOR: Center for Afroamerican and African Studies (CAAS)
  • Careers in Women's Health Panel
    DATE: Wednesday, February 17th
    TIME: 3:30 PM - 4:30 PM
    LOCATION: Lane Hall, Room2239
    SPONSOR: Women's Studies
  • Turning a Page: Immigrant Jews, Reading, and American Identity
    Eric Goldstein, Emory University
    DATE: Wednesday, February 17th
    TIME: 4:00 PM
    LOCATION: 202 S. Thayer St., Room 2022
    SPONSOR: The Frankel Center for Judaic Studies

    CONTACT: 734-763-9047 or judaicstudies@umich.edu
  • Buena Vista Social Club
    Film Connections: Latino Culture Film
    DATE: Wednesday, February 17th
    TIME: 7:00 - 10:00 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan League, Michigan Room
    SPONSOR: University Unions Arts & Programs and Latino Culture Club
    The film is about the influences and evolution of Latin music. Free pizza and pop will be provided. Come check out this FREE film and stay afterward for a discussion about Latino culture!
    CONTACT: Susan Pile, 734 763-3202 or uuap@umich.edu
  • Béla Fleck: The Africa Project
    DATE: Wednesday, February 17th
    TIME: 8:00 PM
    LOCATION: Hill Auditorium
    In his most ambitious project to date, renowned musician Béla Fleck explores the origins of the banjo. During his travels to Africa, Fleck discovered that while the banjo is often considered an American instrument that conjures feelings of the South, its origins lie far from her shores. Throw Down Your Heart, the award-winning film, documents Fleck's travels and explorations of music in Uganda, Tanzania, The Gambia, and Mali. With The Africa Project, Fleck brings to the stage his collaborations with some of Africa's most talented musicians who were also featured in the film. Bassekou Kouyate is one of the true masters of the ngoni, the ancient forerunner of the banjo found throughout West Africa. His stellar band performs music that is as close to the blues as one finds in Africa. Anania Ngoliga is a blind instrumentalist and singer who plays the Wagogo thumb piano, a deep-toned instrument called the ilimba. Wagogo music has a distinctively mysterious scale, and Afropop Worldwide called Ngoliga's performance "the spiritual high point of the program." Guitarist John Kitime has led the acclaimed Kilimanjaro band for over 30 years and has a deep knowledge of the history of Tanzanian music. This boundary-breaking musical adventure celebrates the beauty and complexity of Africa.

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February 18, 2010 - Thursday

  • Longitudinal Depressive Symptomatology and State Anxiety among Women Utilizing Assisted Reproductive Technology
    Anjel Vahratian
    DATE: Thursday, February 18th
    TIME: Noon - 1:30 PM
    LOCATION: Lane Hall, Room 2239
    SPONSOR: Women's Studies
    Anjel Vahratian presents an informal talk on her current research. Limited information on the psychosocial health and well-being of women as they undergo infertility treatment hinders public health professionals in providing preventive resources where they might be needed. Moreover, the demand for infertility-related services has grown faster than the research community's ability to effectively monitor and evaluate such services. The authors sought to examine the relationship between infertility treatment and psychosocial health through a longitudinal analysis. Compared to the control group, women who were undergoing infertility treatment had more anxiety and depressive symptoms at baseline than those who are trying to conceive naturally. Longitudinal data analyses suggest that this psychosocial distress worsens over time and that the effect is markedly different between the fertility treatment and natural conception groups. In addition, the level of psychosocial distress varied depending on whether a pregnancy was achieved or not and continued into the second trimester.
  • Michigan Engineering Zone open house
    DATE: Wednesday, February 18, 2010
    TIME: 3:30 - 5:30 PM
    LOCATION: U-M's Detroit Center in Orchestra Place at 3663 Woodward Ave., Suite 150
    SPONSORS: An example of U-M's increased community involvement, the MEZ is sponsored by the U-M College of Engineering in collaboration with Detroit Public Schools
    More information
  • Growing Up Motown: Stevie Wonder, Michael Jackson and the Making of Motown
    DATE: Thursday, February 18th & Friday, February 19th
    TIME: Noon - 5:00 PM
    LOCATION: Palmer Commons
    SPONSORS: The Center for Afro-American & African Studies (CAAS), the UM's American Music Institute and University Unions' Arts and Programs

    This two day symposium gathers together faculty, musicians, specialists in the history of Motown, former producers and fans of the incredible Motown sound for an in-depth exploration of how artists such as Wonder and Jackson grew up within the record company and how the company itself emerged, in Detroit, to become one of the most distinctive cultural industries of the 20th century.

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February 19, 2010 - Friday

  • Growing Up Motown: Stevie Wonder, Michael Jackson and the Making of Motown
    DATE: Thursday, February 18th & Friday, February 19th
    TIME: Noon - 5:00 PM
    LOCATION: Palmer Commons
    SPONSORS: The Center for Afro-American & African Studies (CAAS), the UM's American Music Institute and University Unions' Arts and Programs

    This two day symposium gathers together faculty, musicians, specialists in the history of Motown, former producers and fans of the incredible Motown sound for an in-depth exploration of how artists such as Wonder and Jackson grew up within the record company and how the company itself emerged, in Detroit, to become one of the most distinctive cultural industries of the 20th century.

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February 20, 2010 - Saturday

  • Benefit: Arabian Nights Charity Ball
    DATE: Saturday, February 20th
    TIME: 7:00 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan Union, Ballroom
    SPONSOR: Verve
    Cost: $20 for students and $25 for adults
  • Huaren Mosaic Culture Show
    DATE: Saturday, February 20th
    TIME: 7:30 PM
    LOCATION: Power Center for the Performing Arts
    SPONSOR: Michigan Union Ticket Office (MUTO) and Huaren Cultural Association
    Huaren Mosaic is a compilation of Huaren culture during one night of exciting shows! Mosaic includes: dance, Chinese yegyo, traditional instruments, martial arts and more!
    COST: All Tickets $5. Service Charges may apply.
  • Hope for Haiti Charity Ball
    DATE: Saturday, February 20th
    TIME: 8:00 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan League
    SPONSORS: Michigan Union Ticket Office (MUTO), Student Nurses Association, University Unions Arts and Programs Dance/Party Committee
    A reception.
    CONTACT: Heather Gray, 734.763.TKTS or heayherg@umich.edu

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February 22, 2010 - Monday

  • Movie: New Muslim Cool - Puerto Rican American Muslims
    Director: Jennifer Maytorena Taylor, 83 minutes
    DATE: Monday, February 22nd
    TIME: 12 Noon
    LOCATION: School of Social Work Building, Room 1636
    SPONSOR: Center for Middle Eastern & North African Studies (CMENAS)
    After FBI raids his mosque, Puerto Rican American Muslim hip-hop star Hamza Perez turns his life around by reaching for a deeper understanding of his faith.
    More information
  • Movie: The Mosque in Morgantown
    Run time: 76 minutes
    DATE: Monday, February 22nd
    TIME: 12 Noon - 1:30 PM
    LOCATION: School of Social Work Building, Room 1636
    SPONSOR: Center for Middle Eastern & North African Studies (CMENAS)
    Journalist Asra Nomani glimpsed Islamic extremism up close when her dear friend and former Wall Street Journal colleague Daniel Pearl was murdered in Pakistan. When she returns home to West Virginia to raise her son, she believes she sees warning signs at the local mosque: exclusion of women, intolerance toward non-believers, and suspicion of the West. Her resulting campaign against extremism in the Islamic Center of Morgantown brings a storm of media attention, unexpectedly pitting her against the mosque's moderates. Through unfolding scenes and intimate interviews, The Mosque in Morgantown frames this local conflict as a means to explore the larger dilemmas facing American Islam. It tells a story of competing paths to social change, American identity and the nature of religion itself.
  • International Intellectual Property Law: A View from the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO)
    Edward Kwakwa
    DATE: Monday, February 22nd
    TIME: 4:00 - 5:15 PM
    LOCATION: Hutchins Hall (room 116)
    The International Law workshop introduces today's most debated issues in international and comparative law.
  • Hillel LGBTQ Ally Training

    DATE: Monday, February 22nd
    TIME: 6:00 - 9:00 PM
    LOCATION: Hillel, Mandell L Berman Center
    SPONSOR: Hillel
    Hillel will be holding Ally Training for all interested leaders and students. This is a two-part training that explores identity and strengthens your ability to serve as an ally to the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer/questioning (LGBTQ) community at U-M.
    This training is divided into two parts: February 15 and February 22 from 6:00 - 9:00 PM. Both parts must be completed in succession.
    CONTACT: Ryan Garber rygarber@umich.edu

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February 23, 2010 - Tuesday

  • MLK 2010 - Tau Beta Pi Luncheon Series:
    Accessibility: Opening Technology to all
    DATE: Tuesday, February 23rd
    TIME: 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: Johnson Rooms, Robert H. Lurie Engineering Center
    SPONSOR: Tau Beta Pi
    While technology is growing in leaps and bounds, not everyone can reap the benefits. Companies design consumer products for the common man but we need to make them more accessible. As technology changes, people with low incomes or disabilities are often left behind. Why do so many products need to be redesigned to be accessible? How do we make products that are not only cutting-edge, but are available for everyone to use? How do we make this a more important issue in the minds of inventors and innovators?
  • Learning from the Community: social identity in the workplace
    DATE: Tuesday, February 23rd
    TIME: 6:30 - 8:00 PM
    LOCATION: East Hall
    SPONSOR: Ginsberg Center
    This session will examine our individual social identities and help participants reflect on how these identities, and the privileges associated with them, impact work and relationships within community settings.
    CONTACT: Maria L. Mora, mmora@umich.edu

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February 24, 2010 - Wednesday

  • TRANSlating Experience: A brownbag educational and discussion series
    DATE: Wednesday, February 10th and 24th
    TIME: 11:30 AM - 1:30 PM
    LOCATION: 3909 (MSA Chambers) Michigan Union
    SPONSOR: Spectrum Center
    TRANSlating Experience is not Transgender 101. This series is meant to critically engage communities around issues of the transgender experience at the University of Michigan. TRANSlating Experience is not just about being trans, it’s about living, learning, working, dating and celebrating being TRANS. A light lunch will be served. Note: the above uses “TRANS” to encapsulate identities inclusive of those who identify and/or present as gender-queer, gender non-normative, gender variant, non-gendered or transgender. While all are welcome to this series, please note that some topics may require existing comfort, knowledge and fellowship with and around the trans-identified community. This series is not intended to be an introduction to the trans-identified community. This series is not intended to serve as counseling or other types of therapy. Go to the Spectrum Center website for a full list of the topics to be presented by date.
  • Somewhere Between Boundaries and Assumptions: Improving TBLG inclusivity in the social work practice
    DATE: Wednesday, February 24th
    TIME: 12 Noon - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: School of Social Work, room 3816
    SPONSOR: Spectrum Center
    This brown-bag lunch session, presented by Rainbow Network and the TBLG Matters Initiative, brings experienced social worker PJ Two Ravens for a presentation and exploration in ways to improve TBLG inclusivity in social work practice, how to create a more welcoming environment, and avoid assumptions about identity. PJ Two Ravens is a licensed clinical/macro social worker currently working in the University of Michigan HIV/AIDS Treatment Program providing mental health services to HIV infected and affected individuals. PJ has done trainings, teaching, and advocacy work over the last 20 years related to HIV, gender identity issues, Native American issues, LGBT health, cultural competency, community organization, sexuality, sexual orientation, and stress management.
    CONTACT: Gabe Javier, 734.763.4186
  • Gayl A. Jones Collegiate Professorship in Afro-American Literature and Culture Inaugural Lecture
    April 5, 1968: On James Brown, Martin Luther King, and the Manly Dimensions of Nonviolent Resistance
    Presented by Michael Awkward, Professor of English Language and Literature and Afro-American and African Studies
    DATE: Wednesday, February 24th
    TIME: 4:10 - 5:30 PM
    LOCATION: Rackham Amphitheater (4th Floor)
    SPONSOR: Center for Afroamerican and African Studies (CAAS)
    The now-fabled televised Boston Garden concert by R & B artist extraordinaire, James Brown, has been widely credited with helping to prevent disillusioned black city residents from rioting in the wake of Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination. Exploring historical and autobiographical accounts—including Brown's own—of the complex negotiations between the singer and members of the Boston political leadership that enabled "Soul Brother Number One" to perform, "April 5, 1968" compares Brown's rhetoric of moderate—and masculinist—leadership against King's increasingly dogged insistence that nonviolent protest be viewed as a manifestation of "Olympian [black] manhood." Further, the lecture considers Brown's courageous performance alongside the much-debated possibility that black athletes would boycott the 1968 Olympics to protest U.S racism and the inability of black NBA players to compel league officials to postpone the start of the playoff series between bitter rivals representing Boston—where Brown had chosen to perform—and Philadelphia.

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February is Black History Month, a remembrance of important people and events in the history of the African diaspora.


February 25, 2010 - Thursday

  • Distinguished University Professorship Lecture Series
    Making History Personal: Constantine Cavafy and the Rise of Rome
    Bruce W. Frier, , the John and Teresa D'Arms Distinguished University Professor of Classics and Roman Law, and professor of law, Law School
    DATE: Thursday, February 25th
    TIME: 4:00 - 5:00 PM
    LOCATION: Rackham Amphitheatre
    SPONSOR: Rackham Graduate School
    This lecture examines how the Greek poet Constantine Cavafy (1863-1933) used the history of Rome's victory over the Hellenistic East in order to explore and explain his own status as a marginalized homosexual writer living in Alexandria during the period of British colonial rule.
  • MGender Discussion Group
    ongoing for six weeks
    DATE: Thursday, February 25th
    TIME: 7:00 - 9:00 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan Union
    SPONSOR: Spectrum Center
    MGender is a six-week dialogue/discussion group offered during the fall and winter terms about the multiple realities and possibilities surrounding gender identity and gender expression. Through the use of conversation, experiential learning, and other forms of expression, we will share, explore and challenge notions of gender. It is our goal to create a climate of support and understanding for all participants in order to engage in a deeper exploration and understanding of gender identity and gender expression. This dialogue intends to provide a space for the celebration and recognition of various forms of gender identity and gender expression. The dialogues will include exercises, various opportunities for personal expression, and interactive discussions in order to explore the construct of gender. The maximum number of participants is limited to twelve. Participants must pre-register for the dialogues and are expected to attend all sessions. The dialogues will be closed to only the participants who attend the first dialogue. Participation is open to students, staff, faculty, and community members. Participation will be free of cost and voluntary. Ground rules and expectations to guide our interactions will be created at the beginning of the first session.
    CONTACT: Timothy Corvidae corvidae@umich.edu

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March 1, 2010 - Monday

  • Intercultural Leadership Seminar
    DATE: Monday, March 1st
    TIME: 9:00 AM - 8:00 PM
    LOCATION: Camp Michigania, Boyne, MI
    SPONSOR: Student Activities and Leadership
    Sponsored by the Office of Student Activities & Leadership, the University of Michigan Alumni Association, the College of Engineering, the International Center, and the Office of Multi-ethnic Student Affairs - Intercultural Leadership Seminar is an interactive 6-day program intended to provide participants with a deeper understanding of how to work more effectively in intercultural settings. The seminar design deliberately addresses attitudes, awareness, knowledge and skills as central aspects to developing intercultural competence. Because ILS attracts those who are concerned with cross-cultural issues, this seminar allows participants to have the unique opportunity to engage in intensive dialogue with others from diverse backgrounds who share the commitment to increasing their own intercultural competence.
    CONTACT: Hanna Tessema at 734.763.5900, saloffice@umich.edu

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March 8, 2010 - Monday

  • Movie: Caught Between Two Worlds
    DATE: Monday, March 8th
    TIME: 12 Noon
    LOCATION: School of Social Work Building
    SPONSOR: Center for Middle Eastern & North African Studies (CMENAS)
    Through interviews with Iranian-Americans, many of whom fled Iran during the 1979 Revolution, this film explores diversity, assimilation into a new culture, language, the traumas of revolution and the hostage crisis, religion, and life in the USA after 9/11.
    CONTACT: Rorujorona LaCroix at 734.647.4143 or cmenas@umich.edu
    More information

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March 11, 2010 - Thursday

  • Keepers of Accounts: The Practice of Inventory in Modern Jewish Culture
    Twentieth Annual David W. Belin Lecture in American Jewish Affairs
    David W. Belin
    DATE: Thursday, March 11th
    TIME: 7:00 PM
    LOCATION: Palmer Commons
    SPONSOR: The Frankel Center for Judaic Studies
    CONTACT: JudaicStudies@umich.edu
    The Belin Lecture in Judaic Studies was established in 1991 through a generous gift from the late David W. Belin of Des Moines and New York. Mr. Belin, a University of Michigan alum, had a distinguished career in law and public service. He also served the American Jewish community in a variety of leadership positions. Past lecturers have spoken on pressing issues related to Jewish faith, culture and family in America.

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March 12, 2010 - Friday

  • "Bring It Back, Take It Forward" Social Justice Conference
    DATE: Friday, March 12th (See also March 13 & 14)
    TIME: 10:00 AM - 10:00 PM
    LOCATION: Rackham Building
    SPONSOR: School of Social Work
    Bring It Back, Take It Forward is an event celebrating 50 years of activism. We intend to bridge the past and the present with an intergenerational dialogue that will produce new ideas and forge new relationships, raise new questions and find new answers. Panel topics will include Environmental Justice, Labor and Economics, Health Care, the Black Action Movement (BAM), Anti-Racism and Pro-diversity Activism, the Criminal Justice System, Transgender, Bisexual, Lesbian, Gay (TBLG) Activism, Feminism, Immigrant Rights, Independent Media from the Underground Press to Today, and more. This event is FREE and open to the public! For further information and a schedule of events, visit http://bringitbacktakeitforward.org/
  • Enforcing Legal Rights in India: Judicial Reform
    CSAS Speaker Series Lecture by Vikram Khanna, School of Law at the University of Michigan
    DATE: Friday, March 12th
    TIME: 4:00 - 6:00 PM
    LOCATION: Room 1636 School of Social Work Building, 1080 South University
    SPONSOR: Center for South Asian Studies

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March 13, 2010 - Saturday

  • "Bring It Back, Take It Forward" Social Justice Conference
    DATE: Saturday, March 13th (See also March 12 & 14)
    TIME: 9:00 - 11:00 AM
    LOCATION: Rackham Building
    SPONSOR: School of Social Work
    Bring It Back, Take It Forward is an event celebrating 50 years of activism. We intend to bridge the past and the present with an intergenerational dialogue that will produce new ideas and forge new relationships, raise new questions and find new answers. Panel topics will include Environmental Justice, Labor and Economics, Health Care, the Black Action Movement (BAM), Anti-Racism and Pro-diversity Activism, the Criminal Justice System, Transgender, Bisexual, Lesbian, Gay (TBLG) Activism, Feminism, Immigrant Rights, Independent Media from the Underground Press to Today, and more. This event is FREE and open to the public! For further information and a schedule of events, visit http://bringitbacktakeitforward.org/
  • Malaysia Cultural Night - CITRAWARNA MALAYSIA
    DATE: Saturday, March 13th
    TIME: 6:00 - 9:00 PM
    LOCATION: Angell Hall Auditorium B
    SPONSOR: Malaysian Student Association (UMIMSA)
    Come join us for a night filled with colors and music of Malaysia. There will be FREE traditional delicacies to be sampled, and also cultural as well as modern performances brought to you by the Malaysian students at the University of Michigan. In addition to that, there will also be FREE gifts and games. Most importantly, admission is FREE for all! So come on and bring your friends and family members to our meaningful event, and also to learn more about the traditions as well as the modern aspects of Malaysia.
    Or visit our website at: www.mcn.umimsa.com
    CONTACT: slyviasze@gmail.com or youning@umich.edu
  • MYSTIC's Bronze Elegance "L" The Show Fashion Charity Show
    DATE: Saturday, March 13th
    TIME: 7:00 PM
    LOCATION: Rogel Ballroom, Michigan Union
    SPONSOR: MYSTIC
    Bronze Elegance Multicultural Charity Fashion Show is an annual event hosted by Alice Lloyd Hall's multicultural council: MYSTIC.
    MYSTIC was established on campus to celebrate the beauty of minorities. As awareness has grown through the years, our goals have expanded to break stereotypes through creating a show in which both models and the students participating behind the scenes display the true diversity of the University of Michigan by representing different shapes, sizes, ethnicities, religions, and backgrounds.

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March 14, 2010 - Sunday

  • LGBTQ Ally Training Program
    DATE: Sunday, March 14th
    TIME: 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan Union, MSA Chambers
    SPONSOR: Spectrum Center
    The LGBTQ Ally Training Program, started in 2005, seeks to empower members of the University community to be active allies to LGBTQ people. More than just a Safe Space program, the Ally Training Program uses a social justice framework to guide participants through a curriculum that bridges new knowledge of developmental theory to the lived experiences of LGBTQ people and Ally-identified people.
    All are welcome to attend, but pre-registration is required. To register for this session, please fill out the form found here: http://uuis.umich.edu/workshop2/workshopdet.cfm?wid=273
    CONTACT: Gabe Javier, javierc@umich.edu
  • "Bring It Back, Take It Forward" Social Justice Conference
    DATE: Sunday, March 14th (See also March 12 & 13)
    TIME: 12 noon - 3:00 PM
    LOCATION: School of Social Work
    SPONSOR: School of Social Work
    Bring It Back, Take It Forward is an event celebrating 50 years of activism. We intend to bridge the past and the present with an intergenerational dialogue that will produce new ideas and forge new relationships, raise new questions and find new answers. Panel topics will include Environmental Justice, Labor and Economics, Health Care, the Black Action Movement (BAM), Anti-Racism and Pro-diversity Activism, the Criminal Justice System, Transgender, Bisexual, Lesbian, Gay (TBLG) Activism, Feminism, Immigrant Rights, Independent Media from the Underground Press to Today, and more. This event is FREE and open to the public! For further information and a schedule of events, visit http://bringitbacktakeitforward.org/

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March 15, 2010 - Monday

  • Movie: The Noble Struggle
    Director: Elli Safari, 29 minutes
    DATE: Monday, March 15th
    TIME: 12 Noon
    LOCATION: School of Social Work Building, Room 1636
    SPONSOR: Center for Middle Eastern & North African Studies (CMENAS)
    This film follows Amina Wadud's struggle for women's rights within Islam. It all began on March 18, 2005 with a mixed-gender Friday prayer congregation in New York. Wadud is a women's rights activist and scholar of the world who quietly, but with utter conviction, explains her analysis of Islam in the classroom, at conferences, in her home, and in the hair dresser's shop.
    More information
  • Movie: Son's Sacrifice - Father/Son-Halal Slaughterhouse
    Director: Yoni Brook, 23 minutes
    DATE: Monday, February 15th
    TIME: 12 Noon
    LOCATION: School of Social Work Building, Room 1636
    SPONSOR: Center for Middle Eastern & North African Studies (CMENAS)
    A Son's Sacrifice follows the journey of Imran, a young American Muslim who struggles to take over his father's halal slaughterhouse in New York City. A first-generation American, Imran must confront his mixed heritage and gain acceptance from his father's immigrant community at the traditional storefront slaughterhouse. On the holiest day of the year, Imran must lead a sacrifice that will define him as a Muslim, as an American, and as a son.
    More information
  • Spring Pride Rally
    DATE: Monday, March 15th
    TIME: 12 noon - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: Central Campus Diag
    SPONSOR: LGBT Commission of MSA and Spectrum Center
    Come and celebrate Spring Pride Week with LGBT Commission!
    CONTACT: Kaelen Medeiros, kaelenmedeiros@gmail.com

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March 16, 2010 - Tuesday

  • CCS 2010 Noon Lecture Series: “Sounds from the Ground: Recently Excavated Warring-States Texts and the Linguistic Reconstruction of Early Chinese”
    DATE: Tuesday, March 16th
    TIME: 12 noon - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: Room 1636 School of Social Work Building, 1080 South University
    SPONSOR: Center for Chinese Studies
    Recent archaeological excavations from before 221 BCE (when China was unified under the Qín dynasty) have produced a large corpus of texts written on bamboo strips, whose script is significantly different from the standard script of later centuries. This talk will illustrate what these texts can tell us about the early pronunciation of the Chinese language.
    Bill Baxter (Department of Asian Languages and Cultures, Department of Linguistics) is a linguist specializing in the history of the Chinese language, and author of A Handbook of Old Chinese Phonology (Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 1992). He is currently collaborating with Laurent Sagart (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris) on an improved reconstruction of the pronunciation, vocabulary, and morphology of Old Chinese, the language of the pre-Qín period
  • The Protest Psychosis: How Schizophrenia Became a Black Disease
    Jonathan Metzl
    DATE: Tuesday, March 16th
    TIME: 2:00 - 3:00 PM
    LOCATION: 1655 Crossroads, School of Public Health I
    SPONSORS: CRECH and CMHD
    A public talk by Jonathan Metzl, Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Women's Studies and Director of the Culture, Health, and Medicine Program at the University of Michigan; in conversation with Harold Neighbors, Professor, Health Behavior & Health Education, and Director, Center for Research on Ethnicity, Culture, and Health; Derek Griffith, Assistant Professor, Health Behavior & Health Education, and Director, Center on Men's Health Disparities. Book Signing from 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm in the Community Lounge (Room 1680) School of Public Health I (books will be available for purchasing and signing). Refreshments will be available. This event is cosponsored by the Center on Men's Health Disparities (CMHD) and CRECH, and is free and open to the public.
    CONTACT: Lynda Fuerstnau at 734.647.6665
  • Gay Shame: Publication Party and Book Signing
    DATE: Tuesday, March 16th
    TIME: 3:00 - 5:00 PM
    LOCATION: Lane Hall Gallery
    SPONSOR: Institute for Research on Women and Gender
    This event features the Editors of the book Gay Shame: David Halperin, of the English Women's Studies and Comparative Literature Departments and Valerie Traub, of the English and Women's Studies Departments.
    Ever since the 1969 Stonewall Riots, gay pride has been the rallying cry of the gay rights movement and the political force behind the emergence of the field of lesbian and gay studies. But has something been lost, forgotten, or buried beneath the drive to transform homosexuality from a perversion to a proud social identity? Have the political requirements of gay pride repressed discussion of the more uncomfortable or undignified aspects of homosexuality?
    Stemming from the international Gay Shame Conference in 2003, Gay Shame seeks to lift this unofficial ban on the investigation of homosexuality and shame by presenting critical work from the most vibrant frontier in contemporary queer studies. Contributors tackle a range of issues questions of emotion, disreputable sexual histories, dissident gender identities, and embarrassing figures and moments in gay history as they explore the possibility of reclaiming shame as a new, even productive, way to examine lesbian and gay culture. Common Language will be on hand selling books and both editors will be available to sign them. This event is free and open to the public.
    CONTACT: irwg@umich.edu
  • Workshop: Demystifying Popular U.S. Culture: Domestic and International Student Perspectives
    DATE: Tuesday, March 16th
    TIME: 5:30 - 7:30 PM
    LOCATION: West Conference Room, 4th Floor, Rackham Building
    SPONSOR: Rackham Graduate School
    Establishing open communication is a first step towards understanding differences and embracing diversity. This discussion consists of a panel of domestic and international graduate students who will share their experiences with regard to U.S. culture—from both “inside” and “outside” perspectives. This event aims to help international students better understand different aspects and norms of U.S. culture, and to help domestic students become more aware of the issues faced by international students. The audience can engage in active dialogue with the panel members throughout the discussion. There will also be a question and answer period following the discussion.
    This workshop is part of the Cross-Cultural Adjustment Series. The workshop is open to all domestic and international graduate students and their family members. Feel free to bring your questions and concerns to the discussion. Snacks will be provided.
    CONTACT: Kim Greenwell, kgreenwe@umich.edu
  • Tamara Williams Memorial Lecture
    Sarah M. Buel, J.D., presents "Using Human Rights Doctrine to Protect Victims of Intimate Partner Violence." Buel has spent the past 32 years working with battered women, abused children, and juveniles within the legal system. Currently, she is a clinical professor at the University of Texas School of Law, having started, then co-directing its Domestic Violence Clinic. A domestic violence survivor, she is a graduate of Harvard Law School, where she founded the Harvard Battered Women's Advocacy Project, the Women in Prison Project, and the Children and Family Rights Project, while an active member of the Harvard Legal Aid Bureau. She is co-chair of the ABA Women and Criminal Justice Committee, and actively involved in human rights projects in Cambodia, China, and Kenya addressing gender-based violence and human trafficking. Tamara Williams was a University of Michigan student and Family Housing resident when she was killed by her boyfriend in 1997. The annual lecture is meant to commemorate her life, raise awareness of domestic and dating violence, and increase interest in their prevention. This program is free and open to the public.
    DATE: Tuesday, March 16th
    TIME: 7:00 - 8:00 PM
    LOCATION: Rackham Building Amphitheatre (4th Floor), 915 E. Washington Street
    SPONSOR: Sponsored by University Housing and Co-sponsored by the School of Social Work, the Sexual Assault Prevention and Awareness Center, and the Interdisciplinary Research Program on Violence Across the Lifespan, a program of the Institute for Research on Women and Gender
    CONTACT: 734-647-2235
  • Day of Silence
    DATE: Tuesday, March 16th
    TIME: 11:00 PM
    LOCATION: North Campus Diag
    SPONSOR: SAGE
    Modeled after the Gay, Lesbian, and Straight Education Network's Day of Silence, which takes place each April, SAGE and the College of Art and Design are participating in a Day of Silence on North Campus. They will be observing a Day of Silence by collaborating with the Art School to make Diag posters on how people have been silenced. There will also be a Silent Rave at 11pm on the North Campus Diag participants will not speak to anyone as a way of showing solidarity for students who have experiences bullying and harassment.
    CONTACT: Gary Wilks, gwwilks@umich.edu

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March 17, 2010 - Wednesday

  • Beneath the Skin, We are all Human: Navigating Life's Common Journey
    CAAS Brownbag Series
    CAAS Faculty Brownbag featuring James Chaffers, Professor Emeritus CAAS/Architecture.
    DATE: Wednesday, March 17th
    TIME: 12 Noon - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: 4701 Haven Hall, CAAS Conference Room
    SPONSOR: Center for Afroamerican and African Studies (CAAS)
  • Through the Pages of the Past: The Jewish Book in History
    DATE: Wednesday, March 17th
    TIME: 7:00 PM
    LOCATION: 202 S. Thayer St., Room 2022
    SPONSOR: Frankel Center for Judaic Studies
    CONTACT: 734-763-9047 or judaicstudies@umich.edu

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March 18, 2010 - Thursday

  • Kawaguchi Ekai’s “True Buddhism”
    Orientalism and Continental Asia in Twentieth-Century Japanese Buddhist Reform - CJS Noon Lecture.
    Richard Jaffe, Creed C. Black Associate Professor of Religion, Duke University DATE: Thursday, March 18th
    TIME: 12 noon - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: 1636 School of Social Work Building
    SPONSOR: Center for Japanese Studies
  • Writer on the Run: Dutch-Iranian writer Kader Abdolah
    Reading from his works and discussing his new translation of the Koran. Kader Abdolah is the penname of Hossein Farahani, an Iranian writer who also writes in Dutch. He studied physics in Iran before fleeing the country as a political refugee. He settled in the Netherlands in 1988, where he has become an unusual and unique voice in Dutch literature. His novels tell of both the magic illusion and the bitter reality of his homeland. My Father's Notebook was the first of his novels translated into English, and The House of the Mosque was recently released worldwide in English translation to great acclaim. In 2008 he published an alternative Dutch translation of the Koran, which sold over 100,000 copies in six months. Currently he is Visiting Writer-in-Residence at UC Berkeley.
    DATE: Thursday, March 18th
    TIME: 12 noon - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: 3222 Angell Hall
    SPONSOR: Dutch Studies in the Department of Germanic Languages and the Department of Comparative Literature's “Year of Translation.”
  • Frankel Institute Colloquium
    The Tegernsee Hagaddah: The Story of a Discovery
    David Stern
    DATE: Thursday, March 18th
    TIME: 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
    LOCATION: 202 S. Thayer St.
    SPONSOR: Museums Theme Year
    CONTACT: Carla M Sinopoli at 734 764-0485, sinopoli@umich.edu
  • Food with a Conscience: Ethical and Jewish Perspectives on the Business of What We Eat
    Seth Goldman, Co-founder and TeaEO, Honest Tea, Ari Weinzweig, Co-owner and Founding Partner, Zingerman's Community of Businesses and Moderator Rabbi Nathan Martin, Associate Director, University of Michigan Hillel. Can businesses be socially responsible and make a profit? How might Jewish values inform the behavior of producers and consumers? Join this discussion of the impact of “good” food on our local and global communities. RSVP on our Facebook page: Food with a Conscience. Event is free and open to the public.
    DATE: Thursday, March 18th
    TIME: 4:00 - 6:00 PM
    LOCATION: Educational Conference Center, Room 1840, School of Social Work Building
    SPONSOR: Hillel
    Presented by the Jewish Communal Leadership Program at the University of Michigan's School of Social Work and The Covenant Foundation: Celebrating Excellence in Jewish Education. The School of Social Work is located at 1080 South University Avenue.
    CONTACT: 734-763-6886 or ssw.alumnioffice@umich.edu
  • North Campus Pride Rally
    DATE: Thursday, March 18th
    TIME: 4:00 - 7:00 PM
    LOCATION: North Campus Diag
    SPONSORS: SAGE and Spectrum Center
    The North Campus Diag Pride Rally will feature speakers from U-M and the wider LGBTA community. There will also be a march around the North Campus Diag and nearby buildings.
    CONTACT: Gary Wilks, gwwilks@umich.edu
  • Conference: CAAS AT 40: Research and Community Partnerships
    Celebrating 40 Years of Excellence in Education (1970 - 2010)
    DATE: Thursday, March 18th (see also March 19th & 20th)
    • Keynote lecture: Reclaiming the Organic Intellectual, Grace Lee Boggs
      LOCATION: Alumni Center
      TIME: 4:00 PM
      Reception at 5:30 PM
    • From Motown to Hip-Hop: a Celebration of Detroit Music
      LOCATION: Michigan League Ballroom
      TIME: 7:00 - 10:00 PM
      Tickets available
    More information
  • Spectrum Center for LGBTQ and Friends Staff/Faculty Social Hour
    DATE: Thursday, March 18th
    TIME: 5:00 - 6:00 PM
    LOCATION: Aut Bar
    SPONSOR: Spectrum Center
    All U-M staff and faculty are invited to join the staff of the Spectrum Center for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and Friends Staff/Faculty Social Hour. The group meets at various restaurants on the third Thursday of each month from 5:15-6:30 p.m. for food, drinks and socializing. This is a great way to meet and hang out with colleagues. For more information and to get on the group e-mail list, contact Ariana Bostian-Kentes at abostian@umich.edu or 763-4186.
  • LGBT Grad Student, Staff and Faculty Mixer
    DATE: Thursday, March 18th
    TIME: 5:30 - 7:30 PM
    LOCATION: West Conference Room, 4th floor, Rackham Building
    SPONSORS: Rackham Graduate School and Spectrum Center
    Join us in celebrating Spring Pride 2010 by mixing and mingling with graduate students, staff and faculty over light refreshments. A welcome will be offered from Rackham Graduate School and the Spectrum Center.
  • Movie: Desi Women in the Reel World: “Sita Sings the Blues” (Animated)
    DATE: Thursday, March 18th
    TIME: 6:30 - 8:30 PM
    LOCATION: 1636 International Institute/SSWB
    SPONSOR: Center for South Asian Studies
    Sita Sings the Blues is an animated feature film written, directed, produced and animated entirely by American artist Nina Paley. The film is the story of Indian epic Ramayana retold, with a feminist point of view. Sita sings the Blues songs and tells her story as Ravana takes her away to Lanka; she is rescued by her husband, and is then subjected to accusations of infidelity.
  • MGender Discussion Group
    MGender is a six-week dialogue/discussion group offered during the fall and winter terms about the multiple realities and possibilities surrounding gender identity and gender expression. Through the use of conversation, experiential learning, and other forms of expression, we will share, explore and challenge notions of gender. It is our goal to create a climate of support and understanding for all participants in order to engage in a deeper exploration and understanding of gender identity and gender expression. This dialogue intends to provide a space for the celebration and recognition of various forms of gender identity and gender expression. The dialogues will include exercises, various opportunities for personal expression, and interactive discussions in order to explore the construct of gender. The maximum number of participants is limited to twelve. Participants must pre-register for the dialogues and are expected to attend all sessions. The dialogues will be closed to only the participants who attend the first dialogue. Participation is open to students, staff, faculty, and community members. Participation will be free of cost and voluntary. Ground rules and expectations to guide our interactions will be created at the beginning of the first session.
    DATE: Thursday, March 18th
    TIME: 7:00 - 9:00 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan Union 3200
    SPONSOR: Spectrum Center
    If you are interested in participating in this program please contact Timothy Corvidae at corvidae@umich.edu.
  • Packaging Girlhood with author Dr. Lyn Mikel Brown
    No longer is the image of girls and girlhood pretty in pink. Now, it's stereotypical, demeaning , limiting, and alarming. Packaging Girlhood exposes the ways media and marketers dictate what girls should look like, enjoy, become, and consume.
    Join Dr. Lyn Mikel Brown, author of “Packaging Girlhood” and co-creator of Hardy Girls Healthy Women of Maine, for a talk on the findings of her research for Packaging Girlhood and what parents and girls can do to counteract the constant barrage of media messages that encourage accessorizing over academics; sex appeal over sports and fashion over friends. Parents and Daughters in grades 8-12 are encouraged to attend. Free and open to the public.
    DATE: Thursday, March 18th
    TIME: 7:00 - 9:00 PM
    LOCATION: The Neutral Zone, 310 E. Washington, Ann Arbor, MI 48104
    SPONSOR: Institute for Human Adjustment

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March 19, 2010 - Friday

  • Conference: CAAS AT 40: Research and Community Partnerships
    Celebrating 40 Years of Excellence in Education (1970 - 2010)
    DATE: Friday, March 19th (see also March 18th & 20th)
    LOCATION: U-M Museum of Art-Multipurpose Room
    • Faculty panel: Thinking Dialectically—Research and Community Activism
      TIME: 9:00 - 10:20 AM
    • Faculty Panel: Trans/national Communities and Cultural Critiques
      TIME: 10:30 AM - noon
    • Faculty Panel: Community Histories—Reflections on the Past and Future
      TIME: 1:00 - 2:30 PM
    • Intergenerational Alumni Panel: Community Histories—Reflections on the Past and Future
      TIME: 2:35 - 4:00 PM
    • Randy Weston conversation with Maurice Jackson
      TIME: 4:15 - 5:15 PM
    • Reception
      TIME: 5:30 - 6:30 PM
    More information
  • Lecture: The Carolina Covenant: Promise and Platform for Student Success
    Shirley Ott, Associate Provost and Director, Office of Scholarships and Student Aid, UNC-Chapel Hill
    DATE: Friday, March 19th
    TIME: 12 Noon - 1:30 PM
    LOCATION: School of Education, Tribute Room
    SPONSORS: Center for Educational Outreach (CEO), Projects Promoting Equity in Urban and Higher Education, and National Center for Institutional Diversity (NCID)
    To RSVP, please visit www.ceo.umich.edu/speakerseries.html

    Since 1977, Shirley A. Ott has served as associate provost and director of scholarships and student aid at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she administers a comprehensive program of $240 million in student aid to 15,500 undergraduate, graduate and professional students. Prior to this appointment, she served as deputy director for student financial aid at the Washington State Higher Education Coordinatin Board for 18 years. M. Ott has held numerous leadership roles in state and national professional associations within student fianncial aid and higher education administration.
  • Antonio Luciano Tosta, "Quando a Globalização Esbarra na Tradição: Renovação e Resistência nas Músicas de Capoeira"
    DATE: Friday, March 19th
    TIME: 12 noon - 2:00 PM
    LOCATION: 1644 SSWB (International Institute)
    SPONSORS: Latin American & Caribbean Studies
    Antonio Luciano Tosta is an Assistant Professor of Brazilian Literature and Culture at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He has a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature and an MA in Portuguese and Brazilian Studies from Brown University. His essays have appeared in several academic journals and as book chapters in the US, Brazil, and England. He is interested in inter-American comparisons, especially in the representations of national ethnic groups. His manuscript Confluence Narratives in the Literatures of the Americas is currently under review by a university press. He is also the editor of the Luso-American Anthology, forthcoming by Rutgers University Press. Capoeira, an Afro-Brazilian artistic expression often described as a martial art/ dance/ game, has always been one of the marks of the Afro-Brazilian identity worldwide. Nowadays Capoeira is practiced in 164 countries, in all continents, by men and women, children and the elderly, and even by disabled people. Its current global status, however, offers a number of challenges to Capoeira, as an emblem of an Afro-descendant tradition and, especially, of opposition to domination. This presentation will investigate to what extent the lyrics (and music) to the contemporary Capoeira songs are exploring Afro-Brazilian identity and globalization. More specifically, it will identify and compare two different sets of songs, which together, I argue, expose the tension between tradition and modernity that the art experiences at the moment.
  • Macaulay’s Man and Engineering Colonial Bombay
    CSAS Speaker Series Lecture by Preeti Chopra, Dept. of Languages and Cultures of Asia, University of Wisconsin
    DATE: Friday, March 19th
    TIME: 4:00 - 6:00 PM
    LOCATION: 1636 School of Social Work Building, 1080 South University
    SPONSOR: Center for South Asian Studies

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March 20, 2010 - Saturday

  • 2010 Transgender, Bisexual, Lesbian, and Gay Interfaith Conference
    The 2010 LGBT Interfaith Conference will be an event with broader aim of helping LGBT people of faith feel welcome and affirmed in their spiritual communities. It will consist of three different programs, each one focused on a particular faith (Christian, Jewish, and Muslim).
    DATE: Saturday, March 20th
    TIME: 12 noon - 5:00 PM
    LOCATION: Dana Natural Resources Building Lobby
    SPONSORS: Spectrum of Faiths, Spectrum Center, Quaker Friends Service Committee, LGBT Commission of MSA, MSA BPC
    CONTACT: Adrian Madriz, amadriz@umich.edu
  • Conference: CAAS AT 40: Research and Community Partnerships
    Celebrating 40 Years of Excellence in Education (1970 - 2010)
    DATE: Saturday, March 20th (see also March 18th & 19th)
    LOCATION: Rackham Amphitheatre
    • Black Humanities Collective/Graduate Student Panel
      TIME: 1:00 - 2:30 PM
    • Tyrone Winfrey, Associate Director of Undergraduate Admissions, moderator with U-M CAAS students
      TIME: 2:45 - 4:30 PM
    • Closing remarks
      TIME: 4:40 - 5:00 PM
    LOCATION: Rackham Assembly Hall
    • Reception
      TIME: 5:00 - 6:00 PM
    LOCATION: Kerrytown Concert House
    • Randy Weston's African Rhythms Trio performance
      TIME: 7:00 PM and 9:00 PM
      Tickets available
    More information
  • Randy Weston's African Rhythms Trio performance
    The Center for Afroamerican and African Studies (CAAS) is pleased to sponsor a performance by Randy Weston's African Rhythms Trio as part of its 40th anniversary conference. The performance will consist of two 70-minute sets at Kerrytown Concert House, 415 North 4th Ave., Ann Arbor, MI 48104. For ticket information call the Kerrytown Concert House at (734) 769-2999. In addition to the performance, Randy Weston will participate in a conversation with Maurice Jackson on the afternoon of Friday, March 19th, at 4 pm at the U-M Museum of Art.
    DATE: Saturday, March 20th
    TIME: 7:00 PM and 9:00 PM
    LOCATION: Kerrytown Concert House, 415 North 4th Ave.
    SPONSOR: CAAS
    (tickets available through Kerrytown Concert House; please call 734-769-2999)
  • Angika: Sculpture and the Dancing Body
    Explore the connections between centuries old traditions of performing and visual arts in India. Performed in the Odissi style by acclaimed dancer and choreographer Sreyashi Dey and her company Srishti, this performance will be narrated by actor-director Martin Walsh and is scripted by poet Zilka Joseph. Odissi classical dance is derived directly from temple sculptures, similar to the ones in UMMA’s collection, creating an intimate connection between the live dancing body and the visual representation of the body in art forms such as sculpture and paintings. A multimedia presentation will add another dimension to the performance.
    DATE: Saturday, March 20th
    TIME: 7:30 PM
    LOCATION: Helmut Stern Auditorium, UMMA
    SPONSOR: UMMA

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March 21, 2010 - Sunday

  • Bright Sheng and Friends: East/West
    UM School of Music, Theatre, and Dance faculty composer and MacArthur fellow Bright Sheng presents his own works—A Night at the Chinese Opera, Three Chinese Love Songs, Seven Tunes Heard in China, The Stream Flows, and the Third String Quartet—juxtaposed with studies in orientalism by Maurice Ravel and Bela Bartok. Sheng is joined by fellow SMTD faculty Stephen Shipps and Logan Skelton, the Phoenix Ensemble, DMA cellist Paul Dwyer, and guest artist Jennifer Goltz.
    DATE: Sunday, March 21st
    TIME: 4:00 PM
    LOCATION: Apse, UMMA
    SPONSOR: UMMA
    Tradition Transformed is made possible in part the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, the UM Center for Chinese Studies, and the Blakemore Foundation. Additional support was provided by Mary Palmer and the George Dewey and Mary J. Krumrine Endowment.

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March 22, 2010 - Monday

  • Confucius Institute at the University of Michigan Open House
    DATE: Monday, March 22nd
    TIME: 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    LOCATION: 715 N. University Second Floor (above Sushi.com)
    SPONSOR: Confucius Institute at the University of Michigan
    First Open House on the Ann Arbor campus featuring: mini concerts, art demonstrations, tasty refreshments, and fabulous prizes. Come and experience diverse Chinese cultures and arts. Our doors are open to all. Questions?
    Please email confucius@umich.edu
  • Movie: The Letter
    Director: Ziad H. Hamzeh, 76 minutes
    DATE: Monday, March 22nd
    TIME: 12 Noon
    LOCATION: School of Social Work Building, room 1636
    SPONSOR: Center for Middle Eastern & North African Studies (CMENAS)
    This film explores what American news outlets have dubbed the Somali Invasion of Lewiston, Maine - an insulated, predominantly white former mill town struggling to maintain its equilibrium in the wake of the 9/11 tragedy.
    More information
  • PHSAD’s 24th Annual Minority Health Conference
    Join us for an exciting week of sessions related to improving global health. Registration is FREE.
    DATE: Monday, March 22nd (See March 22 - March 26, 2010)
    TIME: 2:00 PM
    LOCATION: Palmer Commons
    SPONSOR: Public Health Students of African Descent
    More information on registration, topics and speakers for the week.
  • Exhibit: Cities of the Plain Like Islands in the Sea
    Opening Reception
    DATE: Monday, March 22nd
    TIME: 6:00 - 8:00 PM
    LOCATION: Piano Lounge, Pierpont Commons
    More information
  • Gender Explorers: Ongoing
    DATE: Monday, March 22nd
    TIME: 8:00 PM - 10:00 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan Union, Room 3200
    SPONSOR: Spectrum Center
    A social and support group for transgender, transsexual, genderqueer, TG-questioning people and those who transgress gender binaries. This safe, open, and affirming space includes discussion, fellowship, and significant others. The group meets on the 2nd and 4th Monday of each month in the Spectrum Center.
    To participate and to learn more, email PJ at pajeho@umich.edu.

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March 23, 2010 - Tuesday

  • CCS 2010 Noon Lecture Series: "Confessions of a Peking Tom: A China Odyssey"
    Professor Baum will discuss his new book, China Watcher: Confessions of a Peking Tom. Part memoir, part travelogue, part critique of the China field, and part commentary on China's post-Mao quest for 'wealth and power,' Baum's book has been described by the New Yorker's Evan Osnos as "a wonderfully funny and revealing chronicle of adventure....Baum's odyssey through four decades of China's rise reminds us that true friendship to China requires not only patience, but honesty. As the Chinese expression puts it, he has dared to step off his horse to examine the flowers up-close." CCS affiliates will be particularly interested in Professor Baum's humorous observations and personal anecdotes concerning his long and complicated professional relationship with the late U-M Sinological icon, Michel Oksenberg.
    DATE: Tuesday, March 23rd (See March 22 - March 26, 2010)
    TIME: 12 noon - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: Room 1636 School of Social Work Building, 1080 South University
    SPONSOR: Center for Chinese Studies
    A prominent member of the U.S. China-watching community, Richard Baum is Distinguished Professor of Political Science at UCLA. Former director of the UCLA Center for Chinese Studies, he has written and lectured extensively on contemporary Chinese politics, political economy, and foreign policy. He is the author/editor of nine books, including Burying Mao: Chinese Politics in the Age of Deng Xiaoping (Princeton, 1996); Reform and Reaction in Post-Mao China: The Road to Tiananmen (Routledge, 1991); and Prelude to Revolution: Mao, the Party, and the Peasant Question, 1962-66 (Columbia, 1975). His latest book, released this spring, is China Watcher: Confessions of a Peking Tom. In addition to his academic pursuits, Professor Baum is the founder and manager of Chinapol, the world's leading online listserv for professional China analysts. He is a frequent commentator on Chinese and East Asian politics for the BBC World Service, Voice of America, CNN International, and National Public Radio. He holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of California, Berkeley.
  • PHSAD’s 24th Annual Minority Health Conference
    Join us for an exciting week of sessions related to improving global health. Registration is FREE.
    DATE: Tuesday, March 23rd (See March 22 - March 26, 2010)
    TIME: 3:00 PM
    LOCATION: Palmer Commons
    SPONSOR: Public Health Students of African Descent
    More information on registration, topics and speakers for the week.

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March 24, 2010 - Wedneday

  • Cities of the Plain Like Islands in the Sea
    Guest Lecture: Dr. Diaz's AC231 Pacific Film
    DATE: Wednesday, March 24th
    TIME: 1:00 - 2:30 PM
    LOCATION: Auditorium D Angell Hall
    More information
  • PHSAD’s 24th Annual Minority Health Conference
    Join us for an exciting week of sessions related to improving global health. Registration is FREE.
    DATE: Wednesday, March 24th (See March 22 - March 26, 2010)
    TIME: 3:00 PM
    LOCATION: Palmer Commons
    SPONSOR: Public Health Students of African Descent
    More information on registration, topics and speakers for the week.
  • The Decennial Census: Implications for Latino Policy Research
    John A. Garcia is Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the University of Arizona Department of Political Science. Professor Garcia's research interests include the acquisition and utilization of social capital for political engagement, coalition formation among minority communities; and the social construction of ethnic and racial identity and political involvement. His research has resulted in the participation in the National Chicano Survey (1979), the Latino National Political Survey (1989-90), and Latino National Survey (LNS) (2005-06).
    As we rapidly approach another round of the decennial census, attention will focus upon the challenges associated with counting accurately a very diverse public. This presentation examines the decennial process by focusing upon the Latino community and the range of operational, political, and policy-related issues that connects this community to a constitutionally mandated provision. What is conducted on a ten-year cycle can be framed as a symptomatic of the political development of this community in the American political system.
    DATE: Wednesday, March 24th
    TIME: 4:00 - 5:30 PM
    LOCATION: Annenberg Auditorium, 1120 Weill Hall
    SPONSORS: Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, Center for Public Policy in Diverse Societies, Latina/o Studies at the American Culture Program, Department of Political Science and the Students of Color in Public Policy (SCPP)
  • Freedom of Expression in South Korea: Still an Evolving Right 20 Years After?
    Center for Korean Studies Distinguished Korean Studies Lecture Series
    Speaker/Performer: Kyu Ho Youm
    DATE: Wednesday, March 24th
    TIME: 4:00 - 5:30 PM
    LOCATION: School of Social Work Building, Room 1636
    SPONSOR: Korea Foundation
    CONTACT: 764-1825 or kanepark@umich.edu

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March 25, 2010 - Thursday

  • MLK 2010: Tau Beta Pi Luncheon Series:
    Living in a Global Society: How to Deal with Culture Shock
    Thomas Friedman, author of The World is Flat, brought the effect of globalization to the forefront of public attention. More and more companies are expanding and embracing globalization. Students experience the conflict of different cultures and different societal views on a daily basis in their courses and projects. How can we recognize and handle these cultural differences and create a safe and comfortable environment for everyone? How can we expand our perception to encompass a wider worldview?
    DATE: Thursday, March 25th
    TIME: 11:30 - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: Johnson Rooms Robert H. Lurie Engineering Center
  • Brown-bag lunch: Somewhere between boundaries and assumptions: Improving TBLG inclusivity in social work practice
    DATE: Thursday, March 25th
    TIME: 12 Noon - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: 2816 School of Social Work Building
    SPONSOR: Spectrum Center
    This brown-bag lunch session brings experienced social worker PJ Two Ravens for a presentation and exploration in ways to improve TBLG inclusivity in social work practice, how to create a more welcoming environment, and avoid assumptions about identity.
    PJ Two Ravens is a licensed clinical/macro social worker currently working in the University of Michigan HIV/AIDS Treatment Program providing mental health services to HIV infected and affected individuals. PJ has done trainings, teaching, and advocacy work over the last 20 years related to HIV, gender identity issues, Native American issues, LGBT health, cultural competency, community organization, sexuality, sexual orientation, and stress management.
  • Museum of Anthropology Brown Bag Lecture:
    Putting Moche in its place
    Christopher Attarian
    DATE: Thursday, March 25th
    TIME: 12 Noon - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: Alexander G. Ruthven Museums Bld. Room: 2009
    SPONSOR: Museums Theme Year
    Observations from the Chicama and surrounding valleys about the Gallinazo and Early Mochica culture. In this lecture I present observations from my work in the Chicama Valley and share insights from other scholars about the Early intermediate Period on the North Coast of Peru. In particular, I explore the best explanations for the terms Gallinazo and Mochica as cultural terms.
    CONTACT: Carla M Sinopoli at 734 764-0485, sinopoli@umich.edu
  • PHSAD’s 24th Annual Minority Health Conference
    Join us for an exciting week of sessions related to improving global health. Registration is FREE.
    DATE: Thursday, March 25th (See March 22 - March 26, 2010)
    TIME: 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: Palmer Commons
    SPONSOR: Public Health Students of African Descent
    More information on registration, topics and speakers for the week.
  • Cities of the Plain Like Islands in the Sea
    Guest Lecture: Dr. Najita's AC 388/EN325 Pac Lit
    DATE: Thursday, March 25th
    TIME: 1:00 - 2:30 PM
    LOCATION: 2427 Mason Hall
    More information
  • Spaces of Gendered Vulnerability: A Missing Link in Global Reproductive Health
    Mark Padilla
    DATE: Thursday, March 25th
    TIME: 3:30 - 5:00 PM
    LOCATION: SPH I (room 1690)
    SPONSOR: U-M SPH
    Numerous studies of gender, work, and globalization in the Caribbean have described the rapid transformation of gendered labor throughout the region. While much of this research has focused on women's incorporation into new forms of work, there has been relatively little consideration of how historically-recent changes in the region's insertion into the global tourism industry are reshaping local meanings and practices of gender and the social context of sexual and reproductive behavior among tourism workers. This presentation will examine the intersection of these processes by focusing an ethnographic lens on informal tourism laborers in three coastal tourism areas in the Dominican Republic.
    CONTACT: stephmm@umich.edu
  • Lorna Goodison and V. V. Ganeshananthan - faculty reading
    DATE: Thursday, March 25th
    TIME: 5:00 - 6:00 PM
    LOCATION: Museum of Art (Alumni Memorial Hall), Helmut Stern Auditorium
    SPONSOR: English Language & Literature - MFA Program in Creative Writing
    Lorna Goodison is one of the Caribbean's most distinguished contemporary poets. Her work appears in the Norton Anthology of World Masterpieces and her many honors include the Commonwealth Poetry Prize, Americas Region and the Musgrave Gold Medal. She is the author of numerous books of poetry, including Controlling the Silver, Goldengrove: New and Selected Poems, Travelling Mercies (2001) and Turn Thanks: Poems (1999), as well as two collections of short stories and an acclaimed memoir, From Harvey River: A Memoir of My Mother and Her People which was a finalist for the Charles Taylor Prize for Literary Non-Fiction and the Trillium Award, and won the B.C. Award for Canadian Non-Fiction. Her work, translated into many languages, is widely published and anthologized. Born in Jamaica, Goodison has taught at the University of Toronto and now teaches at the University of Michigan. She divides her time between Ann Arbor and Toronto.
    V.V. Ganeshananthan, a fiction writer and journalist, is the author of Love Marriage (Random House, 2008). Set in Sri Lanka and its diaspora, the novel was named one of Washington Post Book World's Best Books of 2008, selected for the Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers program, and longlisted for the Orange Prize. Ganeshananthan is a graduate of Harvard College, the Iowa Writers' Workshop, and the new MA program at Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism, where she was a Bollinger Fellow specializing in arts and culture. Her short fiction has appeared in Granta, on Esquire.com, and in Himal Southasian magazine. Her journalism and essays have appeared in The Atlantic Monthly, The Wall Street Journal, and The Washington Post, among others. A former vice president of the South Asian Journalists Association, she presently serves on the board of the Asian American Writers' Workshop and on the graduate board of The Harvard Crimson. She is a past recipient of Phillips Exeter's Bennett Fellowship and residency, and has taught at Skidmore College. She is now the Zell Visiting Professor of Creative Writing at the University of Michigan.
  • Cities of the Plain Like Islands in the Sea
    Panel Participation: Pacific Islands Research Center Initiative
    DATE: Thursday, March 25th
    TIME: 6:00 - 9:00 PM
    LOCATION: 3512 Haven Hall
    More information
  • MGender Discussion Group
    MGender is a six-week dialogue/discussion group offered during the fall and winter terms about the multiple realities and possibilities surrounding gender identity and gender expression. Through the use of conversation, experiential learning, and other forms of expression, we will share, explore and challenge notions of gender. It is our goal to create a climate of support and understanding for all participants in order to engage in a deeper exploration and understanding of gender identity and gender expression. This dialogue intends to provide a space for the celebration and recognition of various forms of gender identity and gender expression. The dialogues will include exercises, various opportunities for personal expression, and interactive discussions in order to explore the construct of gender. The maximum number of participants is limited to twelve. Participants must pre-register for the dialogues and are expected to attend all sessions. The dialogues will be closed to only the participants who attend the first dialogue. Participation is open to students, staff, faculty, and community members. Participation will be free of cost and voluntary. Ground rules and expectations to guide our interactions will be created at the beginning of the first session.
    DATE: Thursday, March 25th
    TIME: 7:00 - 9:00 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan Union 3200
    SPONSOR: Spectrum Center
    If you are interested in participating in this program please contact Timothy Corvidae at corvidae@umich.edu.

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March 26, 2010 - Friday

  • PHSAD’s 24th Annual Minority Health Conference
    Join us for an exciting week of sessions related to improving global health. Registration is FREE.
    DATE: Friday, March 26th (See March 22 - March 26, 2010)
    TIME: 1:00 - 4:00 PM
    LOCATION: Palmer Commons
    SPONSOR: Public Health Students of African Descent
    More information on registration, topics and speakers for the week.
  • Fugitive Mullahs and Outlawed Fanatics: Indian Muslims in 19th Century Trans-Asiatic Imperial Rivalries
    CSAS Speaker Series Lecture by Seema Alavi, Dept. of History and Culture, Jamia Milia Islamia
    DATE: Friday, March 26th
    TIME: 4:00 - 6:00 PM
    LOCATION: 1636 School of Social Work Building, 1080 South University
    SPONSOR: Center for South Asian Studies

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Pride Network Health Awareness Week 2010


March 29, 2010 - Monday

  • Film: Lunch with Bokara (38 minutes)
    Shakyh Ahmed Sidi Kostas, a Moroccan sufi of the Qadiri Order and a senior official in the Moroccan Ministry of Islamic Affairs, joins Bokara for a unique one-on-one lunch discussion, exploring a number of engaging topics from a sufi perspective, including justice, the veil and 'Divine intoxication'.
    DATE: Monday, March 29th
    TIME: 12 Noon
    LOCATION: 1636 School of Social Work Building
    SPONSOR: Center for Middle Eastern and North African Studies (CMENAS)
    More information
  • UMHS Pride Network Event
    Women's Sexual Health
    Speaker: Victor Hola
    DATE: Monday, March 29th
    TIME: 4:30 - 5:30 PM
    LOCATION: Room 2C224-UH
    SPONSOR: University of Michigan Health System's Pride Network
    Friends, family and allies please join us for a week of health seminars!
    More information
    CONTACT: Kate Saylor, kmacdoug@umich.edu

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March 30, 2010 - Tuesday

  • Institute for the Humanities Brown Bag Lecture:
    Zora Neale Hurston's Environmental History. A lecture by Susan Parrish
    There has been a strong tendency in scholarship on African America to associate rural southern nature, and the folk cultures which emerged in close response to such a nature, as evolutionarily prior to northern, urban meccas of cultural maturation. By contrast, as Zora Neale Hurston traveled off and on from 1927 to 1937 in the part-southern, part-Caribbean quasi-frontier wilderness of early twentieth-century Florida, she came to see rural life as by no means quaint and unchanging, but rather, mercurial, violent, and temporary. Hurston saw diasporic African culture in the Americas as existing primarily in the convulsive tropical and semi-tropical zones of the hurricane. She saw the hubris of engineering projects such as the draining of the Everglades and the diking of Okeechobee; she saw too how the devastating effects of this hubris particularly affected black communities—in the catastrophic 1928 Okeechobee flood, but also in other rural environments that put working blacks closer to the flash points where extractive and agrarian technologies contested with a volatile nature. In her most famous work, Their Eyes Were Watching God, she uses this hurricane and flood to draw a circle around a "real" historical symptom of an environment, and a history, of disturbance. As such, Hurston would have demurred from the new theory of nature as a self-stabilizing and well-programmed ecosystem developed in the 1940s by the father of modern ecology, Eugene P. Odum.
    DATE: Tuesday, March 30th
    TIME: 12 Noon - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: 202 S. Thayer, Room 2022
    SPONSOR: Institute for the Humanities
    Susan Scott Parrish is an Associate Professor in the Department of English Language and Literature at the University of Michigan. Her first book, American Curiosity: Cultures of Natural History in the Colonial British Atlantic World, was published in 2006. Her current projects involve thinking through the conjunction of environmental history, racial experience, and scientific epistemologies in the Atlantic world from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, with special emphasis on the Caribbean and the U.S. Gulf Coast.
  • UMHS Pride Network Event
    Stress Management and How it Affects Your Health
    Speaker: Kathleen Robertson
    DATE: Tuesday, March 30th
    TIME: 4:00 - 5:00 PM
    LOCATION: Room 2C108-UH
    SPONSOR: University of Michigan Health System's Pride Network
    Friends, family and allies please join us for a week of health seminars!
    More information
    CONTACT: Kate Saylor, kmacdoug@umich.edu
  • Diversifying Higher Education in the 70s: Reflections on BAM and CAAS at the University of Michigan
    Speaker: Dr. Niara Sudarkasa, former director of CAAS, former U-M Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs
    DATE: Tuesday, March 30th
    TIME: 4:00 - 6:00 PM
    LOCATION: Rackham Amphitheater
    SPONSORS: Center for Afroamerican and African Studies (CAAS) and Center for Educational Outreach (CEO)
    Reception immediately following in the Rackham Assembly Hall.
  • Elizabeth James: The Art of Storytelling: Africa Experienced through Words and Objects
    DATE: Tuesday, March 30th
    TIME: 4:30 - 7:30 PM
    LOCATION: U-M Museum of Art
    SPONSOR: CAAS
    In this session, verbal concoctions from master storytellers and visual creations from the U-M Museum of Art highlight Africa's diverse traditions of storytelling. Participants gain an understanding of the stories and peoples of various African regions, nations, and cultures and re-connect with one of the world's oldest art forms and teaching tools. Collaboration with the University Musical Society and the U-M Museum of Art.

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March 31, 2010 - Wednesday

  • UMHS Pride Network Event
    Fitness: Facts and fiction
    Speaker: Colleen Greene
    DATE: Wednesday, March 31st
    TIME: 12 Noon - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: Room 2G209-UH
    SPONSOR: University of Michigan Health System's Pride Network
    Friends, family and allies please join us for a week of health seminars!
    More information
    CONTACT: Kate Saylor, kmacdoug@umich.edu
  • Trafficking, Prostitution, and Inequality
    Catharine A. MacKinnon, Elizabeth A. Long Professor of Law, University of Michigan Law School
    DATE: Wednesday, March 31st
    TIME: 12:15 - 1:15 PM
    LOCATION: Hutchins Hall
    SPONSOR: Center for International & Comparative Law
    The International Law Workshop introduces today's most debated issues in international and comparative law. Speakers will talk for 25 minutes, followed by discussion and questions.
    CONTACT: Stephanie L Wiederhold wls@umich.edu
  • First Days: (dis)Ability in the Classroom (A CRLT Players performance)
    Jeffrey Steiger and the CRLT Players
    DATE: Wednesday, March 31st
    TIME: 2:00 - 4:00 PM
    LOCATION: Johnson Rooms Robert H. Lurie Engineering Center
    The CRLT Players use interactive theater to perform research-based sketches about the experiences of faculty and students. First Days shows an instructor and students as they struggle with issues, stereotypes, and dynamics surrounding visible and invisible disabilities in the classroom. After the performance, participants will be invited to dialogue with the characters, and then the actors will replay the sketch while incorporating audience suggestions.
    CONTACT: James Freeland, crltnorth@umich.edu or (734) 647-4765
  • U.S. Department of Justice Recognizes SAPAC
    SAPAC: A Coordinated Community Response to Sexual and Intimate Partner Violence on Campus
    DATE: Wednesday, March 31st
    TIME: 2:15 - 3:45 PM
    LOCATION: Rackham Amphitheatre
    (Reception with food and beverages afterward until 5:00 PM)
    More information
  • CAAS Africa Workshop: Are We Now Conceptually in a Post-Multilingualism Era: an Analysis of a South African Film
    The Africa Workshop series featuring Sinfree Makoni Professor of Linguistics from Penn State University.
    DATE: Wednesday, March 31st
    TIME: 5:30 - 7:30 PM
    LOCATION: 4700 Haven Hall, CAAS Conference Room
    SPONSOR: CAAS
  • rEVOLUTION Art Show
    SAPAC: A Coordinated Community Response to Sexual and Intimate Partner Violence on Campus
    DATE: Opening Night: Wednesday, March 31st
    TIME: 7:30 PM
    LOCATION: Arts Lounge of the Michigan Union
    Exhibit showcased until Thursday, April 9th
    The art show focuses on issues related to gender, sexuality, and domestic and sexual violence and consists of art pieces that represent multiple mediums, including sculpture, painting, photography, and poetry. Please join us in April for the 5th annual rEVOLUTION!
    More information

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April 1, 2010 - Thursday

  • Hokusai's Great Waves and the Maritime Turn in Japanese Visual Culture
    Christine Guth, Tutor, History of Design, Royal College of Art and Victoria and Albert Museum, UK
    DATE: Thursday, April 1st
    TIME: 12 Noon - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: 1636 School of Social Work Building
    SPONSOR: Center for Japanese Studies
  • Annual Zora Neale Hurston Lecture:
    Lift Every Voice
    Lani Guinier, Bennett Boskey Professor of Law, Harvard Law School
    DATE: Thursday, April 1st
    TIME: 4:00 PM
    LOCATION: 100 Hutchins Hall (University of Michigan Law School
    In 1998, Lani Guinier became the first woman of color appointed to a tenured professorship at the Harvard Law School and is now the Bennett Boskey Professor of Law. Before her Harvard appointment, she was a tenured professor for ten years at the University of Pennsylvania Law School. Educated at Radcliffe College and Yale Law School, Guinier worked in the Civil Rights Division at the U.S. Department of Justice and then headed the voting rights project at the NAACP Legal Defense Fund in the 1980s.
  • UMHS Pride Network Event
    Men's Sexual Health
    Speaker: Victor Hola
    DATE: Thursday, April 1st
    TIME: 4:30 - 5:30 PM
    LOCATION: Room 2C224-UH
    SPONSOR: University of Michigan Health System's Pride Network
    Friends, family and allies please join us for a week of health seminars!
    More information
    CONTACT: Kate Saylor, kmacdoug@umich.edu

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April 2, 2010 - Friday

  • UMHS Pride Network Event
    Food is Fuel: Healthy Eating and Weight Management
    Speaker: Erica Wald
    DATE: Friday, April 2nd
    TIME: 12 Noon - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: Danto Auditorium
    SPONSOR: University of Michigan Health System's Pride Network
    Friends, family and allies please join us for a week of health seminars!
    More information
    CONTACT: Kate Saylor, kmacdoug@umich.edu
  • International Symposium and Performance: Saying Yes to Say No: Art and culture in Sixties Japan
    Keynote lecture with Reiko Tomii: Friday, April 2, 5 pm, Helmut Stern
    Auditorium; Performance by Ei Arakawa: Friday, April 2, 6:30 pm, Apse
    In conjunction with the exhibition Art, Anti-Art, Non-Art, UMMA will present a two-day international symposium and performance considering experimental art of 1960s Japan in a broader cultural and geographical context. The symposium begins with a keynote lecture delivered by Reiko Tomii, an independent scholar and leading authority on postwar Japanese art, followed by a special performance by Ei Arakawa, a New York-based artist (renowned for his inter-subjective group performances), who will reinterpret the legacy of the Japanese avant-garde.
    The second day of the symposium features papers presented by an international host of speakers, including Hiroko Ikegami (Osaka University, Japan), Ryan Holmberg (University of Southern California), Jonathan Hall (Pomona College and Meiji Gakuin University), and Midori Yoshimoto (New Jersey City University).
    DATE:
    TIME: 5:00 PM
    LOCATION: Museum of Art
    SPONSORS: Generously funded by the Center for Japanese Studies and the Department of History of Art, this event is co-organized with the University of Michigan Museum of Art and Department of History of Art, in association with PoNJA-GenKon, a listserv group dedicated to contemporary Japanese art (www.ponja-genkon.net).

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April 5, 2010 - Monday

  • Movie: Deentight
    Director: Mustafa Davis, 75 minutes
    DATE: Monday, April 5th
    TIME: 12 Noon
    LOCATION: School of Social Work Building, room 1636
    SPONSOR: Center for Middle Eastern & North African Studies (CMENAS)
    This is the tale of one of the most influential pop culture movements of our time and its relationship to Islam, one of the worlds fastest growing religions.
    More information

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April 6, 2010 - Tuesday

  • Herman Colloquium on Gender & Economics
    Claudia Goldin
    DATE: Tuesday, April 6th
    TIME: 4:10 - 5:30 PM
    LOCATION: TBA
    SPONSOR: Women's Studies

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April 7, 2010 - Wednesday

  • CAAS Faculty Brownbag: Scott Edmondson
    The CAAS Faculty Brownbag featuring the CAAS Du Bois-Rodney-Mandela Fellow Scott Edmondson.
    DATE: Wednesday, April 7th
    TIME: 12 Noon - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: 4701 Haven Hall, CAAS Conference Room
    SPONSOR: Center for Afroamerican and African Studies (CAAS)
    "Witches as Warped Mirror Images of Chieftaincy, and Other Reflections on Power in Ghanaian Video Films". Featuring the CAAS Du Bois-Rodney-Mandela Fellow Scott Edmondson.
  • Film: La vendedora de rosas
    DATE: Wednesday, April 7th
    TIME: 7:30 - 10:00 PM
    LOCATION: Pierpont Commons, Boulevard Room
    SPONSOR: University Unions Arts & Programs
    This Colombian film is about the life of children who are forced to live their lives on the streets.
  • Student World Assembly Meeting
    DATE: Wednesday, April 7th
    TIME: 8:00 - 9:00 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan League, 3rd Floor Room C
    SPONSOR: Student World Assembly
    Meeting of the Student World Assembly. We discuss a different pressing global issue each week and try to translate these discussions into meaningful actions. We also plan various events around campus. New Members are always welcome!
  • Race, Religion, & Politics in America
    DATE: Wednesday, April 7th
    TIME: 8:00 - 9:15 PM
    LOCATION: Rackham Graduate School Amphitheater
    SPONSOR: Campus Chapel
    Dr. Mark Noll, professor of history at Notre Dame and a leading historian on the history of religion in America, explores the complex interplay between race and religion in the American political scene.

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April 8, 2010 - Thursday

  • Lecture: How Should We Teach About Globalization at a Premier University? OLLI at U-M
    DATE: Thursday, April 8th
    TIME: 10:00 - 11:30 AM
    LOCATION: Clarion Hotel and Conference Center (formerly Best Western), 2900 Jackson Road
    SPONSOR: Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at U-M (50+)
    The speaker is Kenneth Kollman, professor of political science, U-M. His research and teaching focus on political parties, elections, lobbying and the federal system. His lecture will examine several areas of concern related to global interconnectedness that affect the United States and the world. Particular emphasis will be given to the role of our universities in addressing these concerns.
    COST: $30 per person for six-lecture series, $10 per person for one lecture, add $10 for OLLI membership (pro-rated) if not yet a member.
  • Una Isla en Tonos de Rosa: Otros Cuerpos y Deseos para Pensar a Cuba
    Norge Espinosa
    DATE: Thursday, April 8th
    TIME: 10:00 AM - 12 noon
    LOCATION: 3512 Haven Hall
    SPONSOR: Latin American and Caribbean Studies
    In this presentation Cuban poet, playwright, and gay activist Norge Espinosa will analyze recent changes in the dynamics of the acceptance of sexual diversity in Cuba. Relying on literary, filmic, and scenic text, and his own experience as an organizer of the 2008 and 2009 World Anti-Homophobia Day, Espinosa examines how the work of artists/activists have begun to create new perspectives of the national imaginaries. These imaginings of Cuba include, but also transcend, issues of sexual identity. In a moment when the nation is undergoing strenuous changes the key question is which one of these various perspectives on sexual diversity might be part of a future Cuba.
  • Lecture: The Politics of Nationalism and International Adoption in South Korea
    Distinguished Korean Studies Scholars Lecture Series 2009-10
    Speaker/Performer: Professor Katharine Moon
    DATE: Thursday, April 8th
    TIME: 4:00 - 5:30 PM
    LOCATION: School of Social Work Building, Room 1840 (ECC)
    SPONSOR: Korea Foundation
    This lecture addresses the changing conceptualization and policy orientation of the South Korean state and society regarding international adoption and the ways in which issues of adoption helps us understand nationalism and identity politics in South Korea. Specifically, the persistent reluctance of Koreans to adopt their own nationals, despite their opposition to making Korean children available for international adoption, reveals the limits of their ethnonationalistic identity and sentiment.
  • Talk: Pride and Prejudice or Shpendazo miinwaa Kchizheyaa
    DATE: Thursday, April 8th
    TIME: 4:00 - 6:00 PM
    LOCATION: Angell Hall, Auditorium B
    This event will bring together the interdisciplinary interests of several departments as students gather to consider the work of Jane Austen and Jane Schoolcraft, in English and Ojibwe. The event will consist of short presentations by the primary organizers, discussion, and hands-on, small-group translation exercises.

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April 9, 2010 - Friday

  • Lecture: From Farm Labor to Academis Labor
    Dr. Caroline Sotello Viernes Turner, Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, Arizona State University
    DATE: Friday, April 9th
    TIME: 12 Noon - 1:30 PM
    LOCATION: School of Education, Tribute Room
    SPONSORS: Center for Educational Outreach (CEO), Projects Promoting Equity in Urban and Higher Education, and National Center for Institutional Diversity (NCID)
    To RSVP, please visit www.ceo.umich.edu/speakerseries.html

    Caroline Turner's research and teaching interests include access, equity and leadership in higher education, faculty gender and racial/ethnic diversity, organizational change, and the use of qualitative methods for policy research. Her publications include a book entitled Diversifying the Faculty: A Guidebook for Search Committees, which is widely adopted selling over 15, 000 copies nationally and internationally, a co-authored book entitled Faculty of Color in Academe: Bittersweet Success, and a co-edited book, Understanding Minority-Serving Institutions.
  • A Poverty of Rights
    Brodwyn Fischer
    DATE: Friday, April 9th
    TIME: 12 noon - 2:00 PM
    LOCATION: 1644 SSWB (International Institute)
    SPONSOR:
    The study of urban informality -- shantytowns, off-the-books employment, extralegal family arrangements -- has yet to be fully integrated into the fields of either urban history or legal history. In Brazil, as elsewhere in Latin America, informality's ubiquity is widely acknowledged, yet it is still mostly treated as something that exists in opposition to a "normal" order, governed by laws and founded in rights, from which the informal poor are excluded and to which they (mostly fruitlessly) aspire. Based on the century-long history of Rio de Janeiro's favelas, this talk explores urban informality from a different perspective, arguing that the legal and informal spheres have long been interdependent, and that Rio's informal cities are spaces of urban claims-making as well as marginalization. This view differs significantly from those that have emerged from the study of legal pluralism or from prescriptive analyses such as Hernando de Soto's "The Other Path," and also questions presentist interpretations that see urban popular movements of the 70s and 80s as a significant departure from earlier political practices." Brodwyn Fischer (Ph.D., Harvard, 1999) specializes in modern Brazil and Latin America, with an emphasis on histories of law, cities, migration and social inequality. Her book, A Poverty of Rights: Citizenship and Inequality in Twentieth Century Rio de Janeiro (Stanford, 2008), won the Social Science History Association's President's Book Award in 2007, the Conference on Latin American History's Warren Dean Prize for 2007-8, and the Urban History Association's Best Book Prize (non-North American) for 2007-8. Her dissertation received awards from Harvard University and the New England Council of Latin American Studies. Fischer has also published on issues of race, criminal justice, and urban inequality in the Latin American Research Review and in several essay collections in the United States and Brazil. She has received grants from the Fulbright Commission, the Social Science Research Council, the Mellon Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the American Council of Learned Societies. In 2006-7, she was the Jorge Paulo Lemann visiting scholar at Harvard University, where she began work on a new book project entitled "Great Migrations: Emancipation and Urbanization in Brazil, 1888-1970." At Northwestern, Fischer also directs Undergraduate Studies in History and the Program on Latin American and Caribbean Studies.
  • Repatiation Roundtable: Moving towards the Future
    DATE: Friday, April 9th
    TIME: 2:30 - 3:30 PM
    LOCATION: 4448 East Hall
    SPONSOR: U-M Repatriation study & action group
    Panelists:
    • Stuart Kirsch, U-M professor of Anthropology
    • Wenona Singel, MSU law professor and Michigan tribal member
    • Toni Antonucci, Chair, Advisory Committee on Culturally Unidentifiable Human Remains (CUHR) under NAGPRA; Associate Vice President for Research - Social Sciences and Humanities; Professor, Department of Psychology; Research Professor, Institute for Social Research
    More information
  • Asexuality Support Group
    DATE: Friday, April 9th
    TIME: 5:00 - 7:00 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan Union 3200
    SPONSOR: Spectrum Center
    Asexuality is defined as the lack of sexual attraction. An asexual is an individual who is not sexually attracted to anyone. The Asexual Support Group's main focus is to provide a safe space for asexuals to come together and talk about issues they face with others who they identify with. By bringing a group of asexuals and allies together, the Asexual Support Group also aims to increase the visibility and widespread knowledge of asexuality on campus. The group meets every Friday at the Spectrum Center from 5 to 7 pm, everyone is welcome- from out asexuals, to allies, to those who are questioning, and everyone in between.
  • Why We Laugh: Film Screening and Discussion
    DATE: Friday, April 9th
    TIME: 6:00 - 9:00 PM
    LOCATION: CAAS, 505 South State Street, 4700 Haven Hall
    SPONSOR: Center for Afroamerican and African Studies (CAAS)
    Film Screening of Robert Townsend's "Why We Laugh: Black Comedians on Black Comedy". With a discussion by CAAS Assistant Professor Lori Brooks and Arizona State University Associate Professor Bambi Haggins. Moderated by CAAS Associate Professor Robin Means Coleman.
    Phone: 734-764-5513

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April 10, 2010 - Saturday

  • 38th Annual Dance for Mother Earth Powwow
    DATE: Saturday, April 10th & Sunday, April 11th
    TIME: 10:00 AM
    LOCATION: Saline Middle School, 7190 Maple Rd, Saline
    SPONSOR: Native American Student Association
    Doors Open to the Public at 10:00 AM. Grand Entry Saturday 12 noon and 7:00 PM, Sunday 12:00 PM
    Native American Artisans and Food Vendors
    Hand Drum Contest During Saturday Dinner Break
    Admission fee.
    More information
  • Film: "Inside the Campus"
    CCS Chinese Documentary Film Series
    DATE: Saturday, April 10th
    TIME: 7:00 - 8:00 PM
    LOCATION: Angell Hall, Auditorium A
    SPONSOR: Center for Chinese Studies
    This 2008 film, 52 minutes, Mandarin with English subtitles, is a frank account of what it is like to be a college student in contemporary China. French director Camille Ponsin was given the unique opportunity of filming on campus for one year at Nanjing Normal University, an institution of more than 40,000 students.
  • Baaba Maal with special guests NOMO
    DATE: Saturday, April 10th
    TIME: 8:00 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan Theater
    SPONSOR: University Musical Society
    Senegalese master musician Baaba Maal has been making music ranging from contemporary Afropop to expressions of traditional West African music, receiving critical acclaim worldwide. By fusing funk, rock, and blues with the beats and melodies of West Africa, Maal has continually reinforced his role as a seminal artist in the world music arena. The opening act is NOMO, an Afro-Pop, Fela Kuti-inspired nonet originally formed by School of Music, Theatre & Dance graduates in Ann Arbor.
    COST: Tickets $18-42, Michigan Ticket Office, 764-2538 or umstix@umich.edu
    More information

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April 11, 2010 - Sunday

  • 38th Annual Dance for Mother Earth Powwow
    DATE: Saturday, April 10th & Sunday, April 11th
    TIME: 10:00 AM
    LOCATION: Saline Middle School, 7190 Maple Rd, Saline
    SPONSOR: Native American Student Association
    Doors Open to the Public at 10:00 AM. Grand Entry Sunday 12:00 PM
    Native American Artisans and Food Vendors
    Hand Drum Contest During Saturday Dinner Break
    Admission fee.
    More information
  • FestiFools—Annual Giant Puppet Parade on Main Street
    Wear a crazy costume, bring your dancin' shoes, grab a kid, or just bring the kid inside you and come celebrate our 4th annual spectacle of giant, bizarro, "puppets" all designed by U-M students and community members! This not-2-B-missed event starts at 5pm sharp and features the backbeat of GROOVE, a daring student drum ensemble which dazzles with homemade instrument ingenuity and just plain good old-fashioned foolish frivolity. (So what if we're celebrating April Fools a little late this year...don't miss the fun and excitement!)
    DATE: Sunday, April 11th
    TIME: 4:00 - 5:00 PM
    LOCATION: Main Street, Downtown Ann Arbor
    SPONSOR: Lloyd Hall Scholars Program
    WEB: http://festifools.org/
    FestiFeast follows right after at the AUT Bar in Kerrytown!

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April 12, 2010 - Monday

  • Movie: They Call me Muslim
    Director: Diana Ferrero Length: 27 mins.
    DATE: Monday, April 12th
    TIME: 12 noon
    LOCATION: School of Social Work, Room 1636
    SPONSOR: Center for Middle Eastern and North African Studies
    Beautifully shot and finely crafted, THEY CALL ME MUSLIM highlights how women still must struggle for the right to control their own bodies — not only under theocratic regimes, but also in secular, democratic countries where increasing discrimination against Muslims and sexism intersect."
  • Object Lessons in Revolution
    Ashli White
    DATE: Monday, April 12th
    TIME: 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
    LOCATION: Tisch Hall
    Ashli White, Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of Miami, received a B.A. from the University of Virginia (1994), an M.A. from the Winterthur Program in Early American Culture (1997), and a Ph.D. from Columbia University (2003). She specializes in revolutionary and early republican U.S. history, with particular attention to connections between the new nation and the Atlantic world. Her current project, Encountering Revolution: Haiti and the Making of the Early Republic (forthcoming, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010), is a revised form of her dissertation, which won the Bancroft Dissertation Prize for 2003. The manuscript examines refugees who fled the French Caribbean colony of Saint-Domingue during the Haitian Revolution and arrived to the United States. She has held fellowships at the McNeil Center for Early American Studies, the John Carter Brown Library, and the American Philosophical Society, among others. Before joining the history department at the University of Miami, White taught at Columbia University and SUNY Stony Brook. She offers courses on the age of revolution, the early U.S. republic, comparative slavery, material culture, and the Atlantic world. Ashli White will discuss her current project — an examination of material culture in the Age of Atlantic Revolutions.
  • Fischerová — poetry reading
    DATE: Monday, April 12th
    TIME: 5:00 PM - 6:00 PM
    LOCATION: Museum of Art, Helmut Stern Auditorium
    Sylva Fischerová was born in Prague in 1963. She has published six volumes of poems in Czech, including The Tremor of Racehorses: Selected Poems and The Swing in the Middle of Chaos: Selected Poems, which have been translated into English. She has also appeared in several translations and anthologies, including New European Poets (Graywolf, 2008). She lived in the Moravian town of Olomouc for twenty years, where her father, a distinguished philosopher and sociologist, had been rector of Olomouc University. After 1948, his non-Marxist views prevented him from publishing in his own country. Translator Stuart Friebert writes of her work that her "knowledge of human history, the ways she moves in and out of historical events, with an understanding and loving eye turned on our frailties as well as our corruptive tendencies, against the backdrop of her commanding sense of space and time, 'makes beauty from monsters.'" She currently teaches ancient Greek literature and philosophy at the Charles University in Prague.
  • Gender Explorers
    DATE: Monday, April 12th
    TIME: 8:00 - 10:00 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan Union, room 3200
    SPONSOR: Spectrum Center
    A social and support group for transgender, transsexual, genderqueer, TG-questioning people and those who transgress gender binaries. This safe, open, and affirming space includes discussion, fellowship, and significant others. The group meets on the 2nd and 4th Monday of each month in the Spectrum Center. To participate and to learn more, email PJ at pajeho@umich.edu

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April 13, 2010 - Tuesday

  • Using Technology in STEM K-12
    MLK 2010: Tau Beta Pi Luncheon Series
    DATE: Tuesday, April 13th
    TIME: 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: Johnson Rooms Robert H. Lurie Engineering Center
    SPONSOR: MLK 2010
  • Blood and Self in Modern Chinese Medicine and Culture
    CCS 2010 Noon Lecture Series (ongoing)
    DATE: Tuesday, April 13th
    TIME: 12 noon - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: Room 1636, School of Social Work Building
    SPONSOR: Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)
    What does it mean when our understandings of vital body functions changes? This presentation traces the mapping of modern-medical ideas about blood onto pre-existing medical and cultural understandings in China. Through blood, we will explore how cultural exchange has affected the lived experience of the body, the self, and community. Blood is used as both medium and metaphor for the creation of a Chinese modernity.
  • Discussion: Brownbag
    Jidong Yang, Head of Asia Library and Chinese Bibliographer on Visit to China Libraries
    DATE: Tuesday, April 13th
    TIME: 12:10 - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library, Room 806
    SPONSOR: U-M Library's Copyright Office, MPublishing and Asia Library
    In early March, Yang visited Beijing, China. His trip included visits to Peking (Beijing) University, East China Normal University, and CALIS (China's OCLC). He also attended a conference organized by Peking University and Yale University, focusing on traditional Chinese literature and the collection of Chinese books in overseas libraries (especially those in Japan and North America). Join this informal brown bag lunch discussion about his trip, thoughts on Chinese views about Google, copyright, and ideas about encouraging academic exchange.
  • Journeys to the Land of the People: Cold War Radicals, Populism, and the Public in Argentina
    Eduardo Elena
    DATE: Tuesday, April 13th
    TIME: 4:00 - 6:00 PM
    LOCATION: 1014 Tisch Hall
    Eduardo Elena is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Miami. He is in the final stages of a book project titled Consuming Dignity: Peronism, Citizenship, and Consumption in Midcentury Argentina, which explores the controversies surrounding state-led campaigns to shape consumer society and discipline the marketplace. His talk at the University of Michigan shifts focus from Juan and Eva Perón to examine the shadow cast by another famed midcentury Argentine, Ernesto "Che" Guevara, over radical politics and cultural expression in the 1960s and 1970s.
  • History Through Music: The Griot and Music of West Africa
    DATE: Tuesday, April 13th
    TIME: 4:30 - 7:30 PM
    LOCATION: WISD Teaching and Learning Center
    SPONSOR: Center for Afroamerican and African Studies (CAAS)
    This teacher workshop is part of the UMS Theme Series on Africa. Before writing or a reliable means of preserving writings existed in West Africa, social history was preserved through the oral traditions of griots: musical historians who put song and beat to tales of family and town. Today, in African countries such as Senegal, griots still use superb musical artistry and virtuosity on instruments like the kora and djembe to illuminate lineage and ancestral heritage.

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April 14, 2010 - Wednesday

  • Workshop: Witchcraft, Intimacy and Trust: Africa in Comparison
    The Africa Workshop series featuring Peter Geschiere, Professor of Anthropology from University of Amsterdam.
    DATE: Wednesday, April 14th
    TIME: 5:30 - 7:00 PM
    LOCATION: 4700 Haven Hall, CAAS Conference Room
    SPONSOR: Center for Afroamerican and African Studies (CAAS)

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April 15, 2010 - Thursday

  • Musical: Ragtime
    DATE: Thursday, April 15th through Sunday, April 18th
    LOCATION: Power Center for the Performing Arts
    SPONSOR: Department of Musical Theatre
    Ragtime explores the lives of three diverse families at the turn of the 20th century.
    Information on show times and tickets, or call 764-0583.
  • Lecture: Music from the World
    DATE: Thursday, April 15th
    TIME: 10:00 - 11:30 AM
    LOCATION: Clarion Hotel and Conference Center (formerly Best Western), 2900 Jackson Road. Car pool until Clarion construction is finished.
    SPONSOR: University Music Society (UMS)
    Kenneth Fischer, president of The University Musical Society, is the speaker. The UMS is 130 years old. During the 2009-10 academic year the UMS presentations have featured artists from 33 countries. The speaker has been a management consultant, an independent producer and a presenter for 17 years.
    COST: $30 per person for six-lecture series, $10 per person for one lecture, add $10 for OLLI membership (pro-rated) if not yet a member.
  • Exhibit Opening & Public Lecture:
    The Role of Language and Visual Art in Building Transnational Identity in Diasporic Nations
    Idá Abreu, Cape Verdean Artist in Residence
    DATE: Thursday, April 15th
    TIME: 5:00 PM
    LOCATION: Palmer Commons, 100 Washtenaw Ave, Ann Arbor
    A reception with hors d'oeuvres will follow the talk. The opening reception will be accompanied by live music from Indigenous Groove.
    SPONSORS: This residency is sponsored by the International Institute, The Center for World Performance Studies, and the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies.
    CONTACT: 734 936-2777 or cwps@umich.edu

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April 16, 2010 - Friday

  • Musical: Ragtime
    DATES: Thursday, April 15th through Sunday, April 18th
    LOCATION: Power Center for the Performing Arts
    SPONSOR: Department of Musical Theatre
    Ragtime explores the lives of three diverse families at the turn of the 20th century.
    Information on show times and tickets, or call 764-0583.
  • Public Forum kicks off cutting-edge U-M cultural neuroscience conference
    DATE: Friday, April 16th
    TIME: 1:00 - 3:30 PM
    LOCATION: Rackham Amphitheatre, 915 East Washington, Ann Arbor
    SPONSORS: U-M Center for Culture, Mind, and the Brain; the U-M Evolution and Human Adaptation Program; and the Research Center for Group Dynamics at the U-M Institute for Social Research
    Keynote addresses by psychologists Hazel Markus of Stanford University and Michael Posner of the University of Oregon initiate a three-day symposium on the emerging field of cultural neuroscience, which seeks to bridge the natural and social sciences.
    CONTACT: Natalie Dushane, (734) 764-4112, nadushan@umich.edu
    More information
  • Familia, tecnologia e o romance no Brasil
    Bate Papo Series, Jose Luiz Passos
    DATE: Friday, April 16th
    TIME: 12 noon - 2:00 PM
    LOCATION: 1644 SSWB (International Institute)
    José Luiz Passos is Associate Professor of Luso-Brazilian literatures and cultures at UCLA, where he is Vice Chair for Graduate Studies in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, and Director of the Center for Brazilian Studies at the UCLA International Institute. He is the author of Ruínas de linhas puras (Annablume, 1998) and Machado de Assis, o romance com pessoas (University of São Paulo Press, 2007) . In 2008 his play "Carmelo's War," on border conflict and family ties after Othello and Rebellion in the Backlands, received a staged reading at the 32nd Comparative Drama Conference in Los Angeles. In February 2009 Alfaguara issued his first novel, Nosso grão mais fino. He is currently writing a book on visiting and travel narratives about Brazil as a dystopian social landscape. Brazilian novels are often described as stylized scripts about the identity of Brazil or that of its different and ever-changing parts. It was only a hundred years after Brazil's political independence (1822) that Modernism brought to the novel a more diverse lexicon as well as an ironic take on the colonial legacy. Following the 1930 Revolution, writers often grouped together under the loose rubric of Regionalism, depicted socioeconomic hubs characteristic of Brazil's intraregional disparities, such as sugarcane and cocoa plantation clans, migration waves from the backlands, social banditism, gaucho sagas, and rubber extraction in the Amazon. The depiction of these economic cycles and communities resulted in works whose style and vernacular rendered what has then become a long-standing paradigm for the Brazilian novel. This talk examines the challenges writers face when they try to overcome the divide between the country and the city and engage creatively the burden of locale and the sense of a supposedly failed modernity.
  • Latino Culture Show
    The ninth edition of its program entirely produced by University of Michigan students. The program will include dance, music, poetry and drama representing Latino/a culture in the United States and in the 22 Latin American countries. Students have designed choreography for rumba, bachata, cumbia and salsa. The group Aye, from Grand Rapids, will begin the program in the auditorium. The purpose of the Latino Culture Show is to provide a space for analysis, critique and growth of culture and also share with the community a more nuanced portrait of Latino/a culture-breaking stereotypes.
    DATE: Friday, April 16th
    TIME: 7:00 PM
    LOCATION: Lydia Mendelssohn Theater
    More information
    CONTACT: Frances Medina, (347) 698-7795, Franmedi@umich.edu

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April 17, 2010 - Saturday

  • Musical: Ragtime
    DATES: Thursday, April 15th through Sunday, April 18th
    LOCATION: Power Center for the Performing Arts
    SPONSOR: Department of Musical Theatre
    Ragtime explores the lives of three diverse families at the turn of the 20th century.
    Information on show times and tickets, or call 764-0583.

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April 18, 2010 - Sunday

  • Musical: Ragtime
    DATES: Thursday, April 15th through Sunday, April 18th
    LOCATION: Power Center for the Performing Arts
    SPONSOR: Department of Musical Theatre
    Ragtime explores the lives of three diverse families at the turn of the 20th century.
    Information on show times and tickets, or call 764-0583.
  • Annual Holocaust and Armenian Genocide Commemoration
    The Challenges of and Opportunities of Oral Testimonies
    lectures by professors Gerard Libaridian and Sidney Bolkosky
    DATE: Thursday, April 18th
    TIME: 2:00 PM
    LOCATION: Bernath Auditorirum of the David W. Adamany Undergraduate Library at Wayne State University
    COSPONSOR: Armenian Studies Program

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April 19, 2010 - Monday

  • Movie: Journey Into America
    Director: Craig Considine Length: 99 mins.
    DATE: Friday, April 19th
    TIME: 12 noon
    LOCATION: School of Social Work, Room 1636
    SPONSOR: Center for Middle Eastern and North African Studies (CMENAS)
    Muslim professor and team of young American researchers visit more than 75 cities and more than 100 mosques on a project interviewing countless Americans in their homes, schools, and places of worship.

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April 24, 2010 - Saturday

  • Performance: Speak for Yourself: Young Detroiters Talk About Race
    by the Mosaic Youth Theatre of Detroit
    DATE: Saturday, April 24
    TIME: 12:00 noon
    LOCATION: Performance Network Theatre, 120 East Huron Street in Ann Arbor
    SPONSORS: Michigan Youth and Community Program, Program on Intergroup Relations, School of Social Work, Neutral Zone, Children's Theatre Network, and other campus and community groups. Led by Professor and NCID Senior Charter Fellow Barry Checkoway, the Youth Dialogues Program is housed in the NCID
    Speak for Yourself presents the stories of high school students growing up and reaching out across racial and ethnic boundaries in the nation's most segregated metropolitan area. Young people, in their own voices, speak about challenging segregation, strengthening diversity, and creating change. The play draws upon Youth Dialogues on Race and Ethnicity in Metropolitan Detroit, a program of ours which enables young people of African, Asian, White European, Middle Eastern, and Latin American descent to engage in intergroup dialogues, metropolitan tours, community projects, and residential retreats.
    This electrifying one-hour performance will include a brief talk-back with the youth artists. Free refreshments will be available after the performance. There is no charge for tickets, but donations are welcomed.
  • Trotter Community Festival 2010
    MESA/Trotter's 13th Annual Year-End Event DATE: Saturday, April 24th
    TIME: 2:00 - 6:00 PM
    LOCATION: William Monroe Trotter Multicultural Center
    SPONSOR: Multi-Ethnic Student Affairs (MESA)
    The Trotter Community Festival (TCF) is an event dedicated to students in recognition of their accomplishments for the closing of the academic year. This event is open to the entire family and community abroad and will feature entertainment, fun activities, prizes, food, and much more! TCF attracts approximately 400 students who celebrate with us and help us in recognizing graduating students and outstanding student organizations. This is definitely not an event to miss! Trotter Multicultural Center 1443 Washtenaw Ave. (off S. University)
    CONTACT: Kathleen Kirkland at 734-763-9044 or kvk@umich.edu

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April 29, 2010 - Thursday

  • Lavender Graduation 2010
    DATE: Monday, April 29th
    TIME: 4:30 - 6:30 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan Union, Pendleton Room
    SPONSOR: The Spectrum Center
    Lavender Graduation is a celebration of achievement for the University's LGBTQ, Ally and similarly-identified students. Undergraduate, Graduate and pre-/Professional graduates may participate. LavGrad, at its foundation, celebrates the achievements of the graduate through the lens of their identity across the spectrum of gender identity, gender expression and/or sexual orientation.

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April 30, 2010 - Friday

  • CAAS Commencement Ceremony
    DATE: Saturday, April 30th
    TIME: TBA
    LOCATION: TBA
    SPONSOR: Center for Afroamerican and African Studies (CAAS)
    A graduation ceremony in honor of our CAAS majors, minors and graduate certificate candidates. Family and friends welcome.

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May 1, 2010 - Saturday

  • President Obama to deliver U-M spring 2010 commencement address
    DATE: Saturday, May 1st
    TIME: 10:00 AM
    LOCATION: Michigan Stadium
    More information

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May 3, 2010 - Monday

  • Spanish Paleography Workshop
    DATES: May 3-7 and May 10-14, 2010
    TIME: 2:00 - 4:00 PM
    LOCATION: Clements Library, Main Room, 909 S. University Ave, Ann Arbor, MI 48109
    SPONSOR: Program in Latin American and Caribbean Studies (LACS)
    Two Week Workshop, Monday through Friday: May 3-7 and May 10-14, 2010 The purpose of the workshop is to assist scholars planning to work on colonial period documents in Latin America. The workshop will provide a practical, hands-on introduction to Spanish and Spanish-American paleography from the 16th to the 19th centuries. We will learn some of the conventions of colonial-era documents, such as legal formulas and common abbreviations. Working directly with photocopies of actual manuscripts written in a wide variety of hands from different geographic areas and on varied topics, we will read, decode, and transcribe the various handwritings of the different periods. We can accommodate twelve participants. There is no registration cost for the workshop.

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May 6, 2010 - Thursday

  • Science Environments in Africa
    International Conference to Share Ideas and Map Out Strategies for Scientific Solutions, Research, and Education in Africa
    DATES: Thursday, May 6 through Saturday, May 8
    This conference, which brings together experts from a wide array of science, technology, engineering, and mathematical disciplines, represents the U-M STEM-Africa Initiative Launch Conference; NSF-Funded Central African Forests Initiative Annual Research Meeting; and U-M-Mapla Initiative Planning Workshop
    Keynote: The Challenge of Combining the Social with the Ecological
    Dr. Elinor Ostrom, Thursday, May 6th, 5:30 PM, Rackham Ampitheater
    More information

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May 7, 2010 - Friday

  • Science Environments in Africa
    International Conference to Share Ideas and Map Out Strategies for Scientific Solutions, Research, and Education in Africa
    DATES: Thursday, May 6 through Saturday, May 8
    This conference, which brings together experts from a wide array of science, technology, engineering, and mathematical disciplines, represents the U-M STEM-Africa Initiative Launch Conference; NSF-Funded Central African Forests Initiative Annual Research Meeting; and U-M-Mapla Initiative Planning Workshop
    Keynote: Appropriate Technologies for Africa
    Dr. Moses Kizza Musaazi, Friday, May 7th, 5:00 PM, North Campus, Computer Science and Engineering Bldg (CSE), room 1670
    More information
  • The Genesis of Chinese Writing and the Art of Calligraphy
    Exhibition
    DATE: Friday, May 7th
    TIME: 12 noon - 8:00 PM
    LOCATION: Multipurpose Room, Museum of Art, Helmut Stern Auditorium, 525 South State Street
    Experience the original calligraphy of Professor He BingWu complimented by displays devoted to the history of Chinese writing by Dr. SuiWah Chan.
    More information

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May 8, 2010 - Saturday

  • Science Environments in Africa
    International Conference to Share Ideas and Map Out Strategies for Scientific Solutions, Research, and Education in Africa
    DATES: Thursday, May 6 through Saturday, May 8
    This conference, which brings together experts from a wide array of science, technology, engineering, and mathematical disciplines, represents the U-M STEM-Africa Initiative Launch Conference; NSF-Funded Central African Forests Initiative Annual Research Meeting; and U-M-Mapla Initiative Planning Workshop
    More information
  • The Genesis of Chinese Writing and the Art of Calligraphy
    Exhibition
    DATE: Saturday, May 8th
    TIME: 10:00 AM - 8:00 PM
    LOCATION: Multipurpose Room, Museum of Art, Helmut Stern Auditorium, 525 South State Street
    SPONSORS: Confucius Institute and UMMA
    Experience the original calligraphy of Professor He BingWu complimented by displays devoted to the history of Chinese writing by Dr. SuiWah Chan.
    More information

  • Lecture: The Genesis of Chinese Writing
    Dr. SuiWah Chan, Professor Emeritus, Michigan State University, and associate of the Confucius Institute and China Mirror Project at the University of Michigan
    DATE: Saturday, May 8th
    TIME: 2:00 PM
    LOCATION: Helmut Stern Auditorium, Museum of Art, Helmut Stern Auditorium, 525 South State Street
    SPONSORS: Confucius Institute and UMMA
    More information

  • Reception: The Genesis of Chinese Writing and the Art of Calligraphy
    DATE: Saturday, May 8th
    TIME: 3:15 PM
    LOCATION: Commons, Museum of Art, Helmut Stern Auditorium, 525 South State Street
    SPONSORS: Confucius Institute and UMMA
    Dr. Chan and Professor He will be on hand to talk informally with participants in this afternoon of exploration of Chinese writing and the art form of calligraphy. Refreshments will be served.
    More information

  • Lecture and Demonstration: The Art of Chinese Calligraphy
    He BingWu, master calligrapher, professor at the Academy of Social Sciences in Xian, China.
    DATE: Saturday, May 8th
    TIME: 4:00 PM
    LOCATION: Helmut Stern Auditorium and Forum, Museum of Art, Helmut Stern Auditorium, 525 South State Street
    He BingWu has published extensively on the subject and is well known in China for his calligraphy as well as his lectures.
    More information

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May 9, 2010 - Sunday

  • The Genesis of Chinese Writing and the Art of Calligraphy
    Exhibition

    DATE: Sunday, May 8th
    TIME: 10:00 AM - 8:00 PM
    LOCATION: Multipurpose Room, Museum of Art, Helmut Stern Auditorium, 525 South State Street
    SPONSORS: Confucius Institute and UMMA
    Experience the original calligraphy of Professor He BingWu complimented by displays devoted to the history of Chinese writing by Dr. SuiWah Chan.
    More information

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May 16, 2010 - Sunday

  • Kimono Fashion Show
    Exhibition Related Program:
    Wrapped in Silk and Gold: A Family Legacy of 20th-Century Japanese Kimono
    DATE: Sunday, May 16th
    TIME: 2:00 PM
    LOCATION: Helmut Stern Auditorium, Museum of Art, Helmut Stern Auditorium, 525 South State Street
    Since the development of kimono in the 17th century, the choice of kimono and its accessories had to follow subtle but strict codes dictated by such criteria as the relationship to the life cycle, the formality of occasion, age, and taste. Design elements referring to the seasons also play a role in the intricate visual language of kimono. Fabrics, colors, and designs in particular give physical embodiment to the four seasons and affect practical details such as weight, number of layers, and lining choices. For modern approaches to the art of traditional dress, join us for a Kimono fashion show that will present elegant kimono and obi created for various occasions and ages. Local kimono expert Minako Yamasaki will also demonstrate how to wear kimono and obi.
  • A guided tour of Wrapped in Silk and Gold: A Family Legacy of 20th-Century Japanese Kimono
    DATE: Sunday, May 16th
    TIME: 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
    LOCATION: U-M Museum of Art
    SPONSOR: University of Michigan Museum of Art (UMMA)
    Wrapped in Silk and Gold presents for the first time the Museum's recently acquired collection of deluxe kimono, haori, obi, and other traditional Japanese women's garments. Dating from the 1930s through the end of the 20th century, these garments trace changing fashions as the function of kimono changed over the course of time, as well as the arc of a woman's lifetime from youth to maturity. The works in the exhibition are the generous gift of the Yamaguchi family, and were made for and worn by a mother and daughter living in Tokyo. This exhibition is made possible in part by the University of Michigan's Center for Japanese Studies, the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs, the Friends of the University of Michigan Museum of Art, the Charles H. & Katharine C. Sawyer Endowment Fund, The Japan Foundation, New York, the CEW Frances and Sydney Lewis Visiting Leaders Fund, and the Japan Business Society of Detroit Foundation.

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May 22, 2010 - Saturday

  • Learning and Reading Chinese: A Workship on Meaning and Writing for Teachers
    WRITING: Hilda Tao has been using a "story-telling" method when she teaches students Chinese characters. Each Chinese character is composed of a "radical" and some "other parts". By using a "story-telling" method to connect (1) the meaning of the character with (2) the radical and (3) the other parts of the character, a teacher can help students remember how to write the character. Upon telling the story, students usually can remember how to write that character immediately, even though it may have up to 20 strokes. The human mind is better at retaining and remembering stories much faster and longer compared to memorizing stroke orders.
    CONVERSATION: Why Skits? Why do we use skits in our beginning Chinese curriculum? Skits can help students improve their grasp of the Chinese language by learning what to say in a given situation, learning or reviewing grammar, learning practical vocabulary, and improving tones and pronunciation. Tao's "Getting Around in Chinese" is a Skit book published by Center for Chinese Studies. This book contains the text of 27 skits. These skits are also available in CD-ROM.
    DATE: Saturday, May 22nd
    TIME: 10:00 AM - 2:30 PM
    LOCATION: International Institute, Room 1636
    SPONSOR: Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)
  • Exhibition Related Programs:
    Turning Point: Japanese Studio Ceramics in the Mid-20th century
    • Ceramics demonstration with Shigaraki potter Kôyama Kiyoko
      DATE: Saturday, May 22nd
      TIME: 2:00 PM
      LOCATION: Multipurpose Room, Museum of Art, Helmut Stern Auditorium, 525 South State Street
      A leading female potter from the renowned historic kiln town of Shigaraki, Kôyama Kiyoko will demonstrate her clay throwing and building techniques that combine old traditions with innovative approaches. Kôyama recently donated 9 pieces to the Museum, and her work is featured in the Turning Point exhibition.
    • Curator's Talk
      DATE: Saturday, May 22nd
      TIME: 3:30 PM
      LOCATION: A. Alfred Taubman Gallery II, Museum of Art, Helmut Stern Auditorium, 525 South State Street
      Directly following the ceramics demonstration with Kôyama Kiyoko, UMMA's Research Curator of Asian Art and curator of the exhibition Natsu Oyobe will introduce visitors to the exhibition.

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May 23, 2010 - Sunday

  • Exhibition Related Programs:
    Turning Point: Japanese Studio Ceramics in the Mid-20th century
    • Film: Days of Fire (Hibi) (2004)
      Film screening and interview with Kôyama Kiyoko
      DATE: Sunday, May 23rd
      TIME: 2:00 PM
      LOCATION: Helmut Stern Auditorium, Museum of Art, Helmut Stern Auditorium, 525 South State Street
      Kôyama Kiyoko's (b. 1936) life and career is an eloquent story that is also fully representative of what female potters struggled for and achieved in the field of ceramic art. As was the case with many female potters, Kôyama started as a painter who drew designs on pottery. Today she is considered one of the leading Shigaraki potters both nationally and internationally. The feature film Days of Fire (Hibi), starring one of the best actresses in Japan, Tanaka Yûko, as Kôyama, chronicles the potter's dramatic life and the trajectory of her artistic career. The screening is followed by an interview with Kôyama Kiyoko by UMMA's Research Curator of Asian Art and curator of the exhibition Natsu Oyobe.

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June 3, 2010 - Thursday

  • Arab American Art and Culture: Challenges, Reappraisals, and Possibilities
    RAWI, Radius of Arab American Writers
    DATE: June 3 - 5, 2010)
    LOCATION: Palmer Commons Conference Facility, 100 Washtenaw Ave.
    Registration required. Conference free to U-M faculty, students & staff.
    CONTACT: conference2010@rawi.org
    More information

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June 5, 2010 - Saturday

  • Wrapped in Silk and Gold: A Family Legacy of 20th-Century Japanese Kimono
    DATE: Saturday, June 5th
    TIME: 12 noon - 2:30 PM
    LOCATION: University of Michigan Museum of Art
    SPONSOR: The University of Michigan Museum of Art (UMMA)
    Please join us for the first Japanese tea ceremonies in the new UMMA! Kazu Ogoshi and Mitsuko Yoshida, two revered tea masters who have been practicing the Sekishu-style of tea for 65 years, will travel from Japan to UMMA for this special occasion. (This will be their third appearance at UMMA following their visits in 1997 and 2001.) Yasuo Watanabe will provide interpretation and narration. The Sekishu-style of tea was the orthodox style of the ruling Tokugawa Shogunate (1615-1868) and is also known as the “warrior style” tea. These demonstrations will be followed by a limited sampling of tea and Japanese sweets. Seating is limited; please plan to arrive early.
    CONTACT: Stephanie Rieke, 734.763.UMMA or umma.info@umich.edu

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Hispanic Heritage Month: September 15 - October 15


September 13, 2010 - Monday

  • Multicultural Greek Council Diag Day
    DATE: Monday, September 13th
    TIME: 11:00 AM - 3:00 PM
    LOCATION: the Diag
    SPONSOR: Office of Greek Life
    This event is a great opportunity to learn about the Multicultural Greek Council and meet members of its fraternities and sororities.

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September 15, 2010 - Wednesday

  • In Recognition of National ADHD Awareness Week:
    ADHD and Anxiety
    Carolyn Daitch, Ph.D. is an internationally renowned clinician, trainer, author, and presenter. The director of the Center for the Treatment of Anxiety Disorders in Farmington Hills, Michigan, she is a certified and approved consultant and fellow with the American Society of Clinical Hypnosis and a certified Imago therapist. Her most recent, award winning book is, Affect Regulation Toolbox: Practical and Effective Hypnotic Interventions for the Over-reactive Client. She is also the author of the soon-to-be-released book, Anxiety Disorders: The Go-to-Book for Clients and their Therapists.
    DATE: Wednesday, September 15th
    TIME: 12 noon to 1:30 PM
    LOCATION: Rackham Graduate School Amphitheatre
    Did you know that 25-40% of people with AD/HD also have an anxiety disorder? One consequence of having anxiety along with AD/HD is that the anxiety can exacerbate the concentration problems and impulse control that are central to AD/HD. Not only that, but people with anxiety often report chronic worry, along with a host of physical symptoms including abdominal distress, muscle tension, and occasional heart palpitations. The symptoms can quickly intensify to the point where one senses an ill-defined, yet intense fear of impending doom.
    This presentation will teach a variety of self-help techniques that children and adults with AD/HD and anxiety can use to lower anxiety, manage their emotional responses, and navigate their lives from a place of calm and control. For those with AD/HD, decreased anxiety can lead to increased productivity.
    This event is Free and Open to the Public - Refreshments provided!

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September 17, 2010 - Friday

  • Eight Conversations about Race
    with Hazel Rose Markus & Paula M L Moya, both of Stanford University
    Reception immediately following the lecture
    Based on their co-edited volume, Doing Race: 21 Essays for the 21st Century, Markus and Moya will consider eight common conversations that people in the United States have with one another as they make sense of daily events in which race and ethnicity figure prominently.
    DATE: Friday, September 17th
    TIME: 3:00 - 5:00 PM
    LOCATION: Rackham Amphitheater
    SPONSOR: National Center for Institutional Diversity (NCID)
    CONTACT: ncidinfo@umich.edu
  • Presented as part of the Fourth Annual American Romanian Festival
    California Dreamin’ (2007, Cristian Nemescu, Cannes Winner, 155 min, R for some sexual scenes, English subtitles)
    DATE: Friday, September 17th
    TIME: 7:00 PM
    LOCATION: Helmut Stern Auditorium, U-M Museum of Art, 525 South State Street, Ann Arbor
    $10 in advance through http://www.americanromanianfestival.org or cash or check at the door.
    Cristian Nemescus’s last film before his death in a car accident, California Dreamin’, winner of a prestigious Cannes award in 2007, is based on a true story: a NATO train transporting military equipment is stopped in the middle of nowhere by an overzealous chief of a Romanian train station. Set against the backdrop of the 1999 NATO bombing of Yugoslavia, the film explores with humor and gritty realism the impact that the arrival of the American soldiers led by Captain Jones has on the small village community. A cinematic tour de force not to be missed!
    American Romanian Festival Executive Director Marian Tanau and Ramona Uritescu-Lombard, an expert in Romanian cinema and lecturer in the German and Comparative Literature departments at U-M, will introduce the film and host a Q&A after the film.
    SPONSORS: Michigan Arts Council and Cultural Affairs, National Endowment for the Arts, University of Michigan Museum of Art, the Center for Russian and East European Studies, and the School of Music, Theatre, and Dance

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September 18, 2010 - Saturday

  • Presented as part of the Fourth Annual American Romanian Festival
    Sequences (1982, Alexandru Tatos, 98 min, NR, English subtitles)
    DATE: Saturday, September 18th
    TIME: 4:00 PM
    LOCATION: Helmut Stern Auditorium, U-M Museum of Art, 525 South State Street, Ann Arbor
    $10 in advance through http://www.americanromanianfestival.org or cash or check at the door.
    In this 1982 drama by Alexandru Tatos, three sequences, linked together to give a larger perspective on the nature of reality and film, are joined by one film crew at work on two different jobs. In the beginning, the crew is introduced as they juggle their dual roles as state-supported propagandists who laud their government and society, and as private moviemakers working on their own film. Next, they are in a restaurant looking for suitable locations to film when the eatery's owner, through no fault of his own, is induced to wax long and lugubriously on his miserable life. In the last segment, two extras are in the background of a scene, sitting at a table in a restaurant. It slowly becomes apparent to one of them that the man he's sitting with tortured him more than 40 years ago at a Nazi concentration camp during World War II.
    Please join American Romanian Festival Executive Director Marian Tanau and Ramona Uritescu-Lombard, an expert in Romanian cinema and lecturer in the German and Comparative Literature departments at UM, for a talk about Alexandru Tatos and Q&A after the film.
    SPONSORS: Michigan Arts Council and Cultural Affairs, National Endowment for the Arts, University of Michigan Museum of Art, the Center for Russian and East European Studies, and the School of Music, Theatre, and Dance
  • Presented as part of the Fourth Annual American Romanian Festival
    Award Winning Short Films
    DATE: Saturday, September 18th
    TIME: 7:30 PM
    LOCATION: Helmut Stern Auditorium, U-M Museum of Art, 525 South State Street, Ann Arbor
    $10 in advance through http://www.americanromanianfestival.org or cash or check at the door.
    • A Trip To The City (2003, Corneliu Porumboiu, 19 min, Cinefondation Prize, Cannes 2004, Best Prize-Montpelier, France 2004, English subtitles)
      A beautiful morning, the need of the internet in a little village, and the toilet that the mayor’s wife is crying for, bring together the computer pensioned teacher and the mayor’s driver for a little trip to the nearby city in this short film by Corneliu Porumboiu, the director of 12:08 East of Bucharest and Police Adjective.
    • Cigarettes and Coffee (2003, Cristi Puiu, 13 min, Golden Bear Award, Berlin 2004, English subtitles)
      From the director of Death of Mr. Lazarescu comes this short movie about a very common problem with which elder generations are confronted: the issue of knowing little and being offered even less. An old man enters a restaurant in Bucharest. He takes a seat at a table where a younger man who looks like he could be a successful businessman is already eating dessert. Their conversation revolves around a job opening for the older man, who has been out of work for two years. However, if you want work these days, it’s no good coming empty-handed—even if it’s your son who’s doing the employing.
    • The Apartment (2003, Constantin Popescu, 20 min, Best Prize- Venice Film Festival 2004, English subtitles)
      It’s morning. A man wakes up and gets ready for a new day of work or maybe for a short trip. His wife makes him breakfast and then she prepares him a little suitcase. The man leaves, exits the apartment building. The man returns using the back entrance. A farce without a dialogue between the characters.
    • Traffic (2003, Catalin Mitulescu, 15 min, Palme D'Or - Cannes 2004, English subtitles)
      On his way to the next business meeting, Tudor has a 20-minute break. This is enough time to invite a girl to drink a coffee, talk about his daughter and take a photo.
    • Humanitarian Aid (2002, Hanno Höfer, 16 min, Great Prize-Cottbus, Germany 2002, English subtitles)
      Three young men come to Romania to bring humanitarian aid. The inhabitants of a small mountain village await them.
    • Challenge Day (2004, Napoleon Helmis, 10 min, English subtitles)
      Today is Challenge Day. This means everybody must engage in sports. It is a competition between a city in Romania and one in Japan.
    American Romanian Festival Executive Director Marian Tanau and Ramona Uritescu-Lombard, an expert in Romanian cinema and lecturer in the German and Comparative Literature departments at UM, will provide introductions to each of the films and host a Q&A afterward.
    SPONSORS: Michigan Arts Council and Cultural Affairs, National Endowment for the Arts, University of Michigan Museum of Art, the Center for Russian and East European Studies, and the School of Music, Theatre, and Dance

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September 20, 2010 - Monday

  • Leo Sarkisian, "Travels and Ethnomusicology"
    The Music Man is coming to town. This event is a celebration of the University of Michigan's ongoing project to digitize Leo Sarkisian's nearly fifty years of field recordings of African music. Sarkisian, an internationally known musician and ethnomusicologist, broadcast for Voice of America in Africa for forty years. Known as "The Music Man" he hosted Music Time in Africa on VOA. Sarkisian will make remarks about his musical experiences. Reception to follow.
    DATE: Monday, September 20th
    TIME: 4:00 - 5:30 PM
    LOCATION: Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library, Gallery in Room 100
    SPONSORS: MLibrary and African Studies Center
  • Relationship Characteristics, Gender, and Condom Use Among Black Youth in South Africa
    Using longitudinal data collected in KwaZulu-Natal in 1999-2001, Drs. Burgard and Kusunoki examined how a variety of relationship characteristics are linked with black South African young people's condom use at last sex and condom use consistency. They also explored whether differences in the relationship characteristics of young men and women helped to explain gender differences in condom use. Age discordant relationships, relationship concurrency, and more frequent sex were associated with lower condom use among young men and women, while longer relationship durations were associated with intermittently rather than always using condoms among women only. Drs. Burgard and Kusunoki will discuss the implications of these findings for theory and intervention.
    DATE: Monday, September 20th
    TIME: 5:00 - 6:30 PM
    LOCATION: SPH 1655
    SPONSOR: Forum on Gender, Sexual and Reproductive Health
  • Circle K Mass Meeting: Service Comes Full Circle
    Circle K is an international community service organization and is the collegiate level of Kiwanis. The mission of the University of Michigan Circle K is to develop leaders with a lifelong commitment to service. This year, our goal is to exceed 15,000 service hours! We sponsor various service projects with something for everyone everyday. These service projects are all displayed on our online calendar. Anyone can sign up to do service with us, whenever you are free! Come learn more about Circle K at our find your circle themed mass meeting followed by a service social. Come find your circle with Circle K! DATE: Monday, September 20th
    TIME: 7:00 - 8:00 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan Union
    SPONSOR: Circle K

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September 21, 2010 - Tuesday

  • University Christian Outreach: Prayer Meeting
    DATE: Tuesday, September 21st
    TIME: 8:00 - 9:30 AM
    LOCATION: 1236 Washtenaw Court
    SPONSOR: University Christian Outreach
  • CCS Fall 2010 Noon Lecture Series
    China's Cultural Revolution Arts: A Posthumous Life
    Richard Kraus, Professor Emeritus of Political Science, University of Oregon
    DATE: Tuesday, September 21st
    TIME: 12 noon - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: Room 1636 School of Social Work Building, 1080 South University
    The arts of the Cultural Revolution, such as the ballet The Red Detachment of Women, were created in the heat of the moment, to spread revolutionary passion, or at least to shore up the political positions of radicals in the Cultural Revolution. There was little idea of creating eternal classics. Since the end of the Maoist era, these works have enjoyed an odd afterlife, neither as art nor as agitprop, but as icons, deployed anew in very different political and cultural contexts. These Cultural Revolution icons appear to link us to China's tumultuous 1966-1976 decade, yet their irony and cynicism may impede coming to terms with the movement's complex heritage, both in China and abroad.
    Richard Kraus is Professor Emeritus of Political Science at the University of Oregon. A specialist on China's cultural politics, he has written on the Cultural Revolution, the political history of the piano, the changing social role of calligraphy, the impact of economic reform on artists, and the international politics of China's arts.
    SPONSOR: Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)
    CONTACT: chinese.studies@umich.edu
  • Walkers in the City: Young Jewish Women with Cameras: Brown Bag with Deborah Dash Moore
    Beginning in the mid-1930s, a number of young American Jewish women picked up cameras to photograph their urban world. They learned their craft at the New York Photo League (1936-1951), a largely Jewish left-wing school and camera club that not only taught photography but also encouraged a way of seeing the world through collaborative projects. Women at the league recognized the city's gendered practices even as they used their cameras to explore its streets. Several, such as Helen Levitt and Vivian Cherry, focused initially on children and their games, finding music, lyrics, and dance in their street performances. Others, such as Lee Sievan and Rebecca Lepkoff, hung around the city's poor neighborhoods, especially the Lower East Side, recording prosaic routines and uncovering grace in them. When viewed retrospectively, these photographs let us see intimacies of urban life through women's eyes at a time when gender constrained most women's gaze.
    Deborah Dash Moore is Frederick G.L. Huetwell Professor of History and director of the U-M Frankel Center for Jewish Studies.
    DATE: Tuesday, September 21st
    TIME: 12 noon - 1:30 PM
    LOCATION: 202 S. Thayer, Room 2022
    SPONSOR: Institute for Humanities
  • Mobility in Jewish Studies
    This interdisciplinary event addresses issues of mobility, exile, and the representation of Jewishness in European literature and art. Three internationally renowned speakers will discuss their work on mobility and the production of Jewishness within a comparative, European framework.
    DATE: Tuesday, September 21st
    TIME: 2:00 - 5:00 PM
    LOCATION: Vandenberg Room, Michigan League
    SPONSOR: Frankel Center for Judaic Studies
    CONTACT: (734) 763-9047 or judaicstudies@umich.edu
  • G.Phi.G. Student Meeting: Open to all U of M Students & Friends
    All are invited! Glory Phi God Campus Ministry is based on the scripture 1 Cor. 6:20: "For ye are bought with a price: therefore glorify God in your body, and in your spirit, which are God's." We have music, free food, captivating discussions, and an answer to all your heart's questions! So, make a visit to our meeting this week!
    DATE: Tuesday, September 21st
    TIME: 7:00 - 8:30 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan Union, Wolverine ABC (1st Floor)
    SPONSOR: Glorify God Campus Ministry

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September 22, 2010 - Wednesday

  • CAAS Faculty Brownbag with Jon Onye Lockard
    A talk with long time artist and educator CAAS faculty member Jon Lockard.
    DATE: Wednesday, September 22nd
    TIME: 12 noon - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: 4701 Haven Hall
    SPONSOR: Center for AfroAmerican and African Studies (CAAS)
    CONTACT: (734) 764-5513
  • LGBT Welcome Social
    Welcome (or welcome back) to LGBT students! Mix and mingle with new and returning students over light refreshments. A welcome will be offered from Rackham Graduate School and the Spectrum Center. This is the place to connect with other LGBT graduate students at U-M as well as learn about the many LGBT resources around U-M and Ann Arbor.
    Pre-registration is required.
    DATE: Wednesday, September 22nd
    TIME: 5:30 - 7:30 PM
    LOCATION: Rackham Graduate School (Horace H.), Assembly Hall- 4th Floor
    SPONSOR: Spectrum Center
    CONTACT: spectrumcenter@umich.edu

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September 23, 2010 - Thursday

  • "RASHOMON's Shadow," Paul Anderer
    CJS Noon Lecture
    Paul Anderer; Mack Professor of Humanities, East Asian Languages and Cultures; Columbia University
    DATE: Thursday, September 23rd
    TIME: 12 noon - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: Room 1636, School of Social Work Building, 1080 South University, Ann Arbor
    SPONSOR: Center for Japanese Studies
    CONTACT: (734) 764-6307 or umcjs@umich.edu
  • Interested in Learning More About or in Joining the Catholic Church?
    CJS Noon Lecture
    If you have not been baptized or confirmed, have been away from the Church for a while, would like to enter into full communion with the Catholic Church, or would just like to learn more about the Catholic faith, this is the group for you. RCIA (Rite of Christian Initiation for Adults) meets every Thursday from 7 - 9 pm. Questions? Call 663-0557 or email stmarys@umich.edu.
    DATE: Thursday, September 23rd
    TIME: 7:00 - 9:00 PM
    LOCATION: St. Mary Student Parish, 331 Thompson St.
    SPONSOR: Newman Catholic Student Association

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September 24, 2010 - Friday

  • Presented as part of the Fourth Annual American Romanian Festival
    Police, Adjective (2009, Corneliu Porumboiu, Cannes Winner, 115 min, NR, English subtitles)
    DATE: Friday, September 24th
    TIME: 7:00 PM
    LOCATION: Helmut Stern Auditorium, U-M Museum of Art, 525 South State Street, Ann Arbor
    $10 in advance through http://www.americanromanianfestival.org or cash or check at the door.
    In this 2009 film by Corneliu Porumboiu, Cristi is a policeman who refuses to arrest a young man who offers hash to two of his schoolmates. Cristi believes that the law will change; he does not want the life of a young man he considers irresponsible to be a burden on his conscience. For his superior the word conscience has an entirely different meaning.
    American Romanian Festival Executive Director Marian Tanau and Ramona Uritescu-Lombard, an expert in Romanian cinema and lecturer in the German and Comparative Literature departments at UM, will introduce the film and host a Q&A after the film.
    SPONSORS: Michigan Arts Council and Cultural Affairs, National Endowment for the Arts, University of Michigan Museum of Art, the Center for Russian and East European Studies, and the School of Music, Theatre, and Dance
  • CJS Fall 2010 Film Series: Re-Viewing Kurosawa
    In the 1950s, Akira Kurosawa (1910-1998) led Japanese cinema onto the world stage, astonishing viewers with the emotional depth and the technical adroitness of his films. On the centennial of his birth, this series provides a once-in-a-generation chance to see Kurosawa's classics again—including his incomparable early samurai films—in fresh, new 35mm prints. Free and open to the public.

    Rashōmon
    1950 / 88 min. / 35mm / In Japanese with English subtitles.
    By winning first prize at the 1951 Venice Film Festival, Rashomon signaled the arrival of Japanese film in the West. A revisionist take on the samurai genre, of which Kurosawa was a master, this film destabilizes truth by allowing four people to retell their versions of the murder of a man and the rape of his wife.
    DATE: Friday, September 24th
    TIME: 7:00 - 9:00 PM
    LOCATION: Helmut Stern Auditorium, U-M Museum of Art, 525 South State Street, Ann Arbor
    SPONSOR: Center for Japanese Studies
    CONTACT: 734 764-6307 or umcjs@umich.edu

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September 25, 2010 - Saturday

  • Presented as part of the Fourth Annual American Romanian Festival
    Gently Anastasia Was Passing (1979, Alexandru Tatos, 100 min, English subtitles)
    DATE: Saturday, September 25th
    TIME: 4:00 PM
    LOCATION: Helmut Stern Auditorium, U-M Museum of Art, 525 South State Street, Ann Arbor
    $10 in advance through http://www.americanromanianfestival.org or cash or check at the door.
    This 1979 Alexandru Tatos drama is set in a border town occupied by the Germans on the Danube in 1944. There are plenty of collaborators eager to please the Germans. A number of the young men join the partisans, which by orders of the Germans are to be killed on sight. When a Serbian partisan is killed and the orders are to have his body thrown into the village, forbidding anyone to bury it, Anastasia refuses to obey the order.
    Please join American Romanian Festival Executive Director Marian Tanau and Ramona Uritescu-Lombard, an expert in Romanian cinema and lecturer in the German and Comparative Literature departments at UM, for a discussion and Q&A after the film.
    SPONSORS: Michigan Arts Council and Cultural Affairs, National Endowment for the Arts, University of Michigan Museum of Art, the Center for Russian and East European Studies, and the School of Music, Theatre, and Dance
  • Presented as part of the Fourth Annual American Romanian Festival
    Short Films or 2010 Feature Film Premiere (TBA)
    $10 in advance through http://www.americanromanianfestival.org or cash or check at the door.
    DATE: Saturday, September 25th
    TIME: 7:30 PM
    LOCATION: Helmut Stern Auditorium, U-M Museum of Art, 525 South State Street, Ann Arbor
    SPONSORS: Michigan Arts Council and Cultural Affairs, National Endowment for the Arts, University of Michigan Museum of Art, the Center for Russian and East European Studies, and the School of Music, Theatre, and Dance

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September 26, 2010 - Sunday

  • Presented as part of the Fourth Annual American Romanian Festival
    Enescu and Schumann Chamber Music Concert
    $10 in advance through http://www.americanromanianfestival.org or cash or check at the door.
    DATE: Sunday, September 26th
    TIME: 7:30 PM
    LOCATION: Apse, U-M Museum of Art, 525 South State Street, Ann Arbor
    To close the Fourth Annual American Romanian Festival UMMA will host a wonderful evening of chamber music featuring Ann Arbor and Detroit based artists performing works by composers George Enescu and Robert Schumann. Soprano Jennifer Goltz and pianist Larisa Simington will open the concert with two exquisite and unique sets of songs Enescu set to French poets Fernand Gregh (1873-1960) and Clement Marot (1496-1544). These songs, as well as Enescu’s second cello sonata The Weed, evoke Romanian folk music traditions. The concert will conclude with the beautiful Piano Quartet of Robert Schumann, celebrating the 200th anniversary of the composer’s birth and performed by University of Michigan piano professor Christopher Harding, and DSO Musicians Marian Tanau, violin, Jim Van Valkenburg, viola, and Marcy Chanteaux, cello.
    Program:
    • Quatre Melodies sur poemes de Fernand Gregh op. 19
      Sept Chansons de Clement Marot op. 15
      George Enescu (1881-1955)
      Jennifer Goltz, soprano, Larisa Simington, piano
    • Sonata op. 26, nr. 2 in C major “The Weed” for Violoncello and Piano
      George Enescu
      • Allegro moderato ed amabile
      • Allegro agitato, non troppo mosso
      • Andantino, cantabile, senza lentezza
      • Final à la Roumaine: Allegro sciolto
      Marcy Chanteaux, cello, Larisa Simington, piano
    • INTERMISSION
    • Piano Quartet in E-flat Major, Op. 47
      Robert Schumann (1810-1854)
      • Allegro Brillante
      • In Modo D'una Marcia: Un Poco Largamente
      • Scherzo: Molto Vivace
      • Allegro, Ma Non Troppo
      Marian Tanau, violin, James VanValkenburg, viola
      Marcy Chanteaux, cello, Christopher Harding, piano
    SPONSORS: Michigan Arts Council and Cultural Affairs, National Endowment for the Arts, University of Michigan Museum of Art, the Center for Russian and East European Studies, and the School of Music, Theatre, and Dance

September 28, 2010 - Tuesday

  • Africa Workshop: Ato Onoma
    Ato Onoma, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Yale University, "The violent persecution of refugees: the Mano River Basin and the Great Lakes Region."
    DATE: Tuesday, September 28th
    TIME: 4:00 - 6:00 PM
    LOCATION: 4701 Haven Hall
    SPONSOR: Center for AfroAmerican and African Studies (CAAS)
    CONTACT: (734) 764-5513

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September 29, 2010 - Wednesday

  • JCLP celebrates the beginning of the Jewish New Year
    The Jewish Communal Leadership Program (JCLP) invites the SSW community to gather for apples and honey in our sukkah (a temporary dwelling) in the SSW courtyard to mark the inauguration of the JCLP and the beginning of the Jewish new year. All members of the School of Social Work community are welcome. The Sukkah is erected as a part of the festival of Sukkot which marks the time of harvest and reminds us of the fragility of our homes and communities.DATE: Wednesday, September 29th
    TIME: 12 noon - 2:00 PM
    LOCATION: School of Social Work, Courtyard
    SPONSOR: Jewish Communal Leadership Program
    CONTACT: kargold@umich.edu

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September 30, 2010 - Thursday

  • Where the Heart Goes Astray: Guilt and Responsibility in RASHOMON and IKIRU
    Dolores Martinez; Reader, Anthropology, School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS); University of London
    CJS Noon Lecture
    DATE: Thursday, September 30th
    TIME: 12 noon - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: Room 1636, School of Social Work Building, 1080 South University, Ann Arbor
    SPONSOR: Center for Japanese Studies
    CONTACT: )(34) 764-6307 or umcjs@umich.edu
  • Latino Immigrants in Europe
    Lecture by José Moya
    Hispanic Heritage Month Event
    DATE: Thursday, September 30th
    TIME: 4:00 - 6:00 PM
    LOCATION: Room 1636, School of Social Work Building, 1080 South University, Ann Arbor
    SPONSOR: Latina/o Studies Program
  • "Más que un cuento" - Interview with Lydia Cacho, Talk-Show Format
    Lydia Cacho will be interviewed about her experiences as a journalist and her work in Cancun Mexico. There will be two sessions, one in English and one in Spanish. It will be more private and you will have the opportunity to ask your own questions to the speaker.
    DATE: Thursday, September 30th
    TIME:
    LOCATION: William Monroe Trotter Multicultural Center - Common Lounge, 1443 Washtenaw Ave., Ann Arbor
    CAPACITY: 70 people
    RSVP Here: http://www.umich.edu/~hhmmi/cgi-data/htmail/mquc.html
    Hispanic Heritage Month: September 15 - October 15
    CONTACT: hhmmichigan@umich.edu
    Lydia Cacho is a world-renowned investigative journalist and human rights activist who exposed the involvement of notorious Mexican politicians in an underground child pornography, prostitution, and trafficking ring in Cancún, Mexico. She is the founder of the "Centro Integral de Atención a la Mujer y sus Hij@s", also known as CIAM Cancún, the only shelter in Southern Mexico dedicated to protecting women and children whose lives are in danger due to domestic violence and other issues.
  • "Kermez de los derechos" - Dinner and speech by Lydia Cacho
    Lydia Cacho will give a speech about the overall history of what brought her to where she is now. She will talk about who she is, where she is coming from, the struggles she has had to endure, etc. She will also give an overview of what has been going on in Mexico in terms of child pornography, trafficking, and prostitution, and how things have changed throughout the years. In the end, she will address the audience to motivate us to be aware of what is going on in our own country and fight for our rights and for other people's rights. The purpose is to raise awareness that these situations affect everybody and that we are not isolated from the issues; that we are not untouchable and that every one of us forms a part of the fight against those who abuse power against liberty. We want the students who attend the dinner to find in themselves a new passion, a new calling to do something and to realize the difference between being aware of a situation and taking action about it.
    DATE: Thursday, September 30th
    TIME:
    LOCATION: William Monroe Trotter Multicultural Center, Recreation Room - Common Lounge, 1443 Washtenaw Ave., Ann Arbor
    CAPACITY: 70 people
    RSVP Here: http://www.umich.edu/~hhmmi/cgi-data/htmail/mquc.html
    Hispanic Heritage Month: September 15 - October 15
    CONTACT: hhmmichigan@umich.edu

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October 1, 2010 - Friday

  • Teacher Workshop on Southeast Asian Art and Culture
    UMMA and the UM Center for Southeast Asian Studies will cosponsor an exciting workshop for educators highlighting traditional and contemporary art from Thailand and Cambodia. Teachers will have a private tour of this material with renowned scholar and UM alumni, Forrest McGill. They will also be introduced to UMMA's celestial Apsara made of decommissioned weapons. As always, the event begins with a light meal and all participants receive teaching materials to take back to the classroom.
    Registration required.
    DATE: Friday, October 1st
    TIME: 4:00 PM
    LOCATION: Galleries and Mulitpurpose Room, Museum of Art
    SPONSOR: University of Michigan Museum of Art (UMMA)
    CONTACT: Email Pam Reister at preister@umich.edu or Jann Wesolek at jannwes@umich.edu for more information.
  • CJS Fall 2010 Film Series: Re-Viewing Kurosawa
    In the 1950s, Akira Kurosawa (1910-1998) led Japanese cinema onto the world stage, astonishing viewers with the emotional depth and the technical adroitness of his films. On the centennial of his birth, this series provides a once-in-a-generation chance to see Kurosawa's classics again—including his incomparable early samurai films—in fresh, new 35mm prints. Free and open to the public.
        Movie: Ikiru
    A dying man learns how "to live" (ikiru), choosing a small act of worth that transcends the mundane preoccupations of his prior life. The jewel of Kurosawa's humanist cinema.
    DATE: Friday, October 1st
    TIME: 7:00 - 9:00 PM
    LOCATION: Askwith Auditorium, Lorch Hall, 611 Tappan Street, Ann Arbor
    SPONSOR: Center for Japanese Studies
    CONTACT: (734) 764-6307 or umcjs@umich.edu
  • National Pan-Hellenic Council Ice Breaker
    DATE: Friday, October 1st
    TIME: 10:00 PM - 1:30 AM
    LOCATION: Michigan Union Ballroom
    SPONSOR: Office of Greek Life
    Annual dance/party sponsored by the National Pan-Hellenic Council. Tickets will be available at the Michigan Union Ticket Office.
    COST: Tickets will be available at MUTO.

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October 3, 2010 - Sunday

  • National Pan-Hellenic Council Open House
    DATE: Sunday, October 3rd
    TIME: 6:00 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan Union, Pendleton Room
    SPONSOR: Office of Greek Life
    Learn more about the fraternities and sororities in the Divine Nine. There will be presentations by all chapters and an opportunity to meet members of the chapters.

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October 4, 2010 - Monday

  • Artist Mel Rosas
    Lecture on Latin American influence on his work
    Hispanic Heritage Month Event
    DATE: Monday, October 4th
    TIME: 3:00 - 5:00 PM
    LOCATION: Trotter Multicultural Center
  • Partners of Transfolk
    The Spectrum Center is excited to announce our new Partners of Transfolk Support Group. This is a bi-weekly open forum drop-in group to provide support and community for people of all genders to discuss and explore their relationships with trans-identified or gender non-conforming individuals in a safe environment. Group is open to people currently or formerly in partnerships with trans-people. The group will meet on the first and third Mondays of the month in the Spectrum Center, which is located at 3200 Michigan Union (3rd Floor), 530 South State Street, Ann Arbor. If you have any questions please contact partnersoftransfolk@umich.edu. DATE: Monday, October 4th
    TIME: 6:00 - 7:30 PM
    LOCATION: 3200, Michigan Union
    SPONSOR: Spectrum Center
    CONTACT: partnersoftransfolk@umich.edu

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October 6, 2010 - Wednesday

  • Fifth Annual Symposium on Mental Health in the Workplace
    Reasonable Accommodations: What You Should Know
    Investing in Ability Week Event
    Presenter: Carole F. Dubritsky, Assistant Director and ADA Coordinator, Office of Institutional Equity
    Facilitator: Lorna Hurl, M.S.W., Ph.D., Faculty/Staff Counselor, Faculty and Staff Assistance Program
    DATE: Wednesday, October 6th
    TIME: 10:00 - 11:30 AM
    LOCATION: Palmer Commons, Great Lakes Room, 100 Washtenaw Ave.
    Refreshments provided
    Many of us are aware of different types of job accommodations for persons with physical disabilities, but are you familiar with accommodations you may need to provide for hidden disabilities, like ADHD, anxiety or depression? Join us for this informative and interactive presentation which will cover the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments and, through the use of case studies and an open-discussion format, provide practical guidance for faculty, staff, managers and human resource professionals regarding reasonable accommodations in these instances.
  • Lecture: Before and After Babel: Linguistic Exceptionalism and Pluralism in Early Rabbinic Literature and Jewish Antiquity
    Steven Fraade, Yale University
    DATE: Wednesday, October 6th
    TIME: 4:00 - 5:00 PM
    LOCATION: 202 S. Thayer St, Room 2022
    SPONSOR: Frankel Center for Judaic Studies
    CONTACT: (734) 763-9047 or judaicstudies@umich.edu

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October 7, 2010 - Thursday

  • CJS Noon Lecture:
    Bank Integration and Transmission of Financial Shocks: Evidence from Japan
    Masami Imai
    This talk investigates whether banking integration plays an important role in transmitting financial shocks across geographical boundaries by using a data set on the branch network of nation-wide city banks and a prefecture-level data set on the formation and collapse of the real estate bubble in Japan. The results show that the credit and economic cycle of financially integrated prefectures exhibits higher sensitivity to fluctuation in land prices in the cities relative to financially isolated ones. These results suggest nation-wide banks can be a source of economic volatility when they pass on the impacts of financial shocks to host economies.
    DATE: Thursday, October 7th
    TIME: 12 noon - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: Room 1636, School of Social Work Building, 1080 South University, Ann Arbor
    SPONSOR: Center for Japanese Studies
    CONTACT: (734) 764-6307 or umcjs@umich.edu
  • Lecture: Language Use and Choice Among Jews in Postwar Warsaw, 1860-1939
    Kalman Weiser
    DATE: Thursday, October 7th
    TIME: 12 noon - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: Alumni Center, Rooms A & B, 200 Fletcher
    SPONSOR: Frankel Center for Judaic Studies
    CONTACT: (734) 763-9047 or judaicstudies@umich.edu
  • Hispanic Heritage Month Event
    Artes Tecnicas: Interview with Astronaut George Zamka
    Presenter: Col. George Zamka, NASA Astronaut
    DATE: Thursday, October 7th
    TIME: 3:30 - 4:10 PM
    LOCATION: Johnson Rooms, Lurie Engineering Center
    More information
    SPONSORS: College of Engineering, Hispanic Heritage Month Planning Committee, Latino Engineering Graduate Organization, Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
  • Hispanic Heritage Month Event
    Engineering and Operations in Practice - a Space Station Assembly Mission from Space Shuttle Endeavour
    Presenter: Col. George Zamka, NASA Astronaut
    DATE: Thursday, October 7th
    TIME: 5:00 - 6:00 PM
    LOCATION: Stamps Auditorium
    More information
    SPONSORS: College of Engineering, Hispanic Heritage Month Planning Committee, Latino Engineering Graduate Organization, Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
  • Poetry Reading & Book Release for Orange Alert
    Kazim Ali
    DATE: Thursday, October 7th
    TIME: 5:15 - 6:00 PM
    LOCATION: U-M Museum of Art (UMMA), Helmut Stern Auditorium
    SPONSORS: English Language & Literature: MFA Program in Creative Writing, Zell Visiting Writers Series, University of Michigan Press
    Kazim Ali is is the author of two books of poetry, The Far Mosque, and The Fortieth Day, in addition to Orange Alert: essays on poetry, art, and the architecture of silence, published as part of the University of Michigan Press's Poets on Poetry series in October 2010. He is also the author of the novels Quinn's Passage, named one of “The Best Books of 2005” by Chronogram magazine, and The Disappearance of Seth, and of the trans-genre memoir Bright Felon: Autobiography and Cities. A second trans-genre volume of essays, lyric prose and memoir is forthcoming in 2011 from Tupelo Press. His work has been featured in many national journals such as Best American Poetry 2007, American Poetry Review, Boston Review, Barrow Street, jubilat and Massachusetts Review. He teaches at Oberlin College and at the Stonecoast MFA program, and is a founding editor of Nightboat Books.

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October 8, 2010 - Friday

  • Film Screening
    The House on Gulmohar Avenue
    Introduction by filmmaker, Samina Mishra
    Sometimes the story of a life is the story of a search to be at home. The House on Gulmohar Avenue traces the personal journey of the filmmaker through the ideas of identity and belonging. The film is set in a part of New Delhi called Okhla, where four generations of the filmmaker’s family have lived. An area that is predominantly inhabited by Muslims. An area that is sometimes also called Mini Pakistan. Set against a quiet presence of the political context in India, the film seeks an honest and deeply personal understanding of what it can mean to be Muslim in India today.
    DATE: Friday, October 8th
    TIME: 4:00 - 6:00 PM
    LOCATION: Room 1636, School of Social Work Building, 1080 South University Avenue
    SPONSOR: Center for South Asian Studies (CSAS)
    CONTACT: csas@umich.edu
    More information
  • CJS Fall 2010 Film Series: Re-Viewing Kurosawa
    In the 1950s, Akira Kurosawa (1910-1998) led Japanese cinema onto the world stage, astonishing viewers with the emotional depth and the technical adroitness of his films. On the centennial of his birth, this series provides a once-in-a-generation chance to see Kurosawa's classics again—including his incomparable early samurai films—in fresh, new 35mm prints. Free and open to the public.
        Movie: Seven Samurai
    A desperate village hires seven masterless samurai to protect itself from marauders in Kurosawa's epic masterpiece. Hollywood remade this movie as "The Magnificent Seven," but gunslinging can't match the original's relentless final battle in the rain.
    DATE: Friday, October 8th
    TIME: 7:00 - 9:00 PM
    LOCATION: Askwith Auditorium, Lorch Hall, 611 Tappan Street, Ann Arbor
    SPONSOR: Center for Japanese Studies
    CONTACT: (734) 764-6307 or umcjs@umich.edu

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October 10, 2010 - Sunday

  • Día de la Familia: Clinic for Latino Families
    A family and Latino-focused event! Dia de la Familia features entertainment, games, crafts, health screenings, food, face painting and resources that address mental, physical and social health issues in the Latino community.
    Hispanic Heritage Month Event
    DATE: Sunday, September 10th
    TIME: 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: Ann Arbor District Library (downtown location), 343 South Fifth Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48104
    SPONSOR: U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center
    CONTACT: Aisha T. Langford, alangfor@med.umich.edu, 734.327.8301
  • Writer Series - Adonis
    Considered one of the Arab world's greatest living poets, Adonis is the author of numerous collections, including Mihyar of Damascus; A Time Between Ashes and Roses; If Only the Sea Could Sleep; The Pages of Day and Night; Transformations of the Lover; The Book of the Five Poems; The Blood of Adonis, winner of the Syria-Lebanon Award of the International Poetry Forum; Songs of Mihyar the Damascene; Leaves in the Wind, and First Poems. He is also an essayist, an editor of anthologies, a theoretician of poetics, and the translator of several works from French into Arabic. Adonis's awards and honors include the first ever International Nâzim Hikmet Poetry Award, the Syria-Lebanon Best Poet Award, and the Highest Award of the International Poem Biennial in Brussels. He has taught at the Lebanese University as a professor of Arabic literature, at Damascus University, and at the Sorbonne. He has been a Lebanese citizen since 1961 and currently lives in Paris.
    DATE: Sunday, October 10th
    TIME: 5:00 PM
    LOCATION: Helmut Stern Auditorium, Museum of Art
    SPONSOR: UMMA
  • Presented as part of Hispanic Heritage Month
    Film: "A Class Apart"
    Carlos Sandoval producer and director
    "A Class Apart" is a documentary film chronicling the landmark 14th Amendment case, Hernandez v. Texas.
    Free and open to the public. Discussion following the film.
    Film synopsis: In the tiny town of Edna, Texas, in 1951, field hand Pete Hernandez murdered tenant farmer Joe Espinosa after exchanging words in a gritty cantina. From this unremarkable small-town murder emerged a landmark civil rights case that would forever change the lives and legal standing of tens of millions of Americans. "A Class Apart" tells the little-known story of a band of underdog Mexican-American lawyers who took their case, Hernandez v. Texas, all the way to the Supreme Court, where they successfully challenged Jim Crow-style discrimination against Mexican-Americans. In the landmark case, defense lawyers forged a daring legal strategy, arguing that Mexican-Americans were "a class apart" and did not neatly fit into a legal structure that recognized only blacks and whites. As legal skirmishes unfolded, the lawyers emerged as brilliant, dedicated, humorous and at times terribly flawed men. This film dramatically interweaves the story of its central characters — activists and lawyers, returning veterans and ordinary citizens, murderer, and victim — within the broader history of Latinos in America during a time of extraordinary change.
    DATE: Sunday, October 10th
    TIME: 7:00 PM
    LOCATION: Rackham Amphitheater, 3rd Floor Rackham School of Graduate Studies, 915 E. Washington Street, University of Michigan
    SPONSORS: Latina/o Studies, Academic Freedom Lecture Fund, King-Chávez-Parks (KCP) Visiting Scholars Program
    CONTACT: Maria E. Cotera (734-615-8867), Peggie J. Hollingsworth (734-769-0376 or Linda M. Carr (734-764-0303)
  • Presented as part of Hispanic Heritage Month
    Discussion of book "Colored Men" and "Hombres Aqui": Hernandez v. Texas and the Emergence of Mexican American Lawyering
    by Michael A. Olivas, William B. Bates Distinguished Chair in Law, University of Houston Law Center
    Free and open to the public.
    DATE: Sunday, October 10th
    TIME: 8:00 PM
    Book signing of book by Professor Olivas.
    TIME: 8:30 PM
    LOCATION: Rackham Amphitheater, 3rd Floor Rackham School of Graduate Studies, 915 E. Washington Street, University of Michigan
    SPONSORS: Latina/o Studies, Academic Freedom Lecture Fund, King-Chávez-Parks (KCP) Visiting Scholars Program
    CONTACT: Maria E. Cotera (734-615-8867), Peggie J. Hollingsworth (734-769-0376 or Linda M. Carr (734-764-0303)

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October 11, 2010 - Monday

  • From Maimonides to Microsoft: The Jewish Law of Copyright Since the Birth of Print
    Lecture: Neil Netanel, UCLA
    DATE: Monday, October 11th
    TIME: 12:30 - 1:30 PM
    LOCATION: 202 S. Thayer St, Room 2022
    SPONSOR: The Frankel Center for Judaic Studies
    CONTACT: (734) 763-9047 or judaicstudies@umich.edu
  • Pathways Through the Joint Women's Studies PhD Programs and Beyond
    A panel of alumni of the joint Women's Studies doctoral programs. Cari Carpenter: PhD, WS and English, 2002; Associate Professor of English, West Virginia University; Erika Gasser: PhD, WS and History, 2007; Assistant Professor of History, California State University, Sacramento; Christa McDermott: PhD, WS and Psychology, 2007; Science and Policy Fellow, Department of Energy, Washington D.C; Carla Pfeffer, PhD, Sociology w. Certificate in WS, 2009: Assistant Professor of Sociology, Purdue University North Central
    DATE: Monday, October 11th
    TIME: 3:00 - 5:00 PM
    LOCATION: 2239 Lane Hall
    SPONSOR: Women's Studies Department
  • 20th Annual University of Michigan Senate's Davis, Markert, Nickerson Lecture on Academic and Intellectual Freedom
    "God, Grades, and Sex: The Developing Law of the College Classroom"
    Michael A. Olivas, William B. Bates Distinguished Chair in Law, University of Houston Law Center
    Free and open to the public.
    DATE: Monday, October 11th
    TIME: 4:00 PM
    LOCATION: Blau Auditorium, Stephen M. Ross School of Business, 701 Tappan Avenue, University of Michigan
    SPONSOR: Academic Freedom Lecture Fund, et al
    CONTACT: Linda M. Carr (734-764-0303) or Peggie J. Hollingsworth (734-769-0376
  • U-M Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Event
    Film: A Passing of the Torch
    DATE: October 11th
    TIME: 7:00 - 8:30 PM
    LOCATION: Hatcher Graduate Library, Library Gallery (Room 100)
    More information

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October 12, 2010 - Tuesday

  • My Brothers
    What does it mean to be a man of color at Michigan?
    Through reflections and discussion on this complex question, you will have a chance to express your experiences here at UofM and build connections with other brothers on campus. MY BROTHERS is a safe space open to all self-identified men of color at the University of Michigan.
    Lunch will be served followed by a speaker and small group discussion.
    DATE: Tuesday, October 12th
    TIME: 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: MSA Chambers, Michigan Union
    SPONSOR: Multi-Ethnic Student Affairs
  • The Great Encounter of 1492 and the Birth of the Diverse New World American and Natural American Medicines
    Dr. Eloy Rodriguez, the James A. Perkins endowed Professor and Research Scientist at Cornell; Concentration: Plant Biochemistry; Plant chemical Ecology; Ethno Botany, Ethnomedicine; medicinal natural products chemsitry, environmental toxicology
    The lecture will tell the story of the Aztec physician Martin de la Cruz. In 1552, de la Cruz wrote, illustrated, and produced the first herbal book on natural botanical medicines in the New World. Many of the Mexican remedies included in the book are still used throughout the Americas, some which have been used to develop modern pharmaceuticals for the treatment of cancer and other diseases.
    Hispanic Heritage Month Event
    DATE: Tuesday, October 12th
    TIME: 5:00 PM
    LOCATION: 1755 Auditorium, School of Public Health, 109 S. Observatory
    Catered reception to follow
    More information
    SPONSORS: MIRA, UUAP & HHM
  • U-M Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Faculty Alliance (UMFA)
    Annual reception and brief meeting (about 6 pm) for UM faculty and deans who are LGBT or interested in issues related to LGBT faculty.
    DATE: Tuesday, October 12th
    TIME: 5:00 - 7:00 PM
    LOCATION: East Conference Room, Rackham Graduate School
    SPONSOR: Spectrum Center
  • Film Screening: Atumpan: The Talking Drums of Ghana
    U-M Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Event
    Filmed in Ghana: the story and sounds of the talking master drums of the Ashanti.
    Fomtomfrom drums
    DATE: Tuesday, October 12th
    TIME: 6:30 PM
    LOCATION: African Studies Center: Room 1636, School of Social Work Building, 1080 S. University
    SPONSORS: African Studies Center, Office of the Senior Vice Provost
    In observance of the Peace Corps' 50th year celebration, James Acheampong, the chief drum maker at the Centre for National Culture of Ghana (Kumasi) crafted a specially commissioned set of fontomfrom drums—the drums that symbolize the rank and status of chiefs, announce the opening of parliament, and have the capability of speech. Now part of the permanent collection of the University of Michigan School of Music, Theatre & Dance, the drums will be heard at key points during the U-M celebrations.
    More information

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October 13, 2010 - Wednesday

  • U-M Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Event
    National Symposium: The Future of International Service
    DATE: October 13th
    TIME: 8:30 AM - 5:30 PM
    LOCATION: Blau Auditorium Ross School of Business
    More information
  • Jews and Muslims in Modern France: A Century of Coexistence and Conflict
    Lecturer: Ethan Katz, University of Cincinnati
    DATE: Wednesday, October 13th
    TIME: 4:00 - 5:00 PM
    LOCATION: Room 2022, 202 S. Thayer
    SPONSOR: Judaic Studies
    CONTACT: The Frankel Center for Judaic Studies, (734) 763-9047 or judaicstudies@umich.edu
  • U-M Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Event
    Paul Theroux: How the Peace Corps Changed My Life
    DATE: October 13th
    TIME: 7:00 PM
    LOCATION: Hatcher Graduate Library, Library Gallery (Room 100)
    More information
  • U-M Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Event
    Challenges and Opportunities of International Service: A Student Symposium
    TIME & DATES: 10:00 PM, October 13th through 1:00 AM October 14th
    LOCATION: Pendleton Room, Michigan Union
    More information

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October 14, 2010 - Thursday

  • U-M Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Event
    First Ceremony on Michigan Union steps in the commemoration of the 50th anniversary of JFK’s speech that led to the creation of the Peace Corps
    DATE: Thursday, October 14th
    TIME: 2:00 - 2:30 AM
    LOCATION: Michigan Union steps
    More information
  • A Roundtable on Native American Culture, Gender & Healing
    DATES: Thursday, October 14th through Friday, October 15th
    The events are free and open to the public.
    MORE INFORMATION
    SPONSORS: Fetzer Institute, Native American Studies Program, Office of the Provost, Department of Psychology, UM's National Center for Institutional Diversity (NCID), Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research (MICHR), and School of Social Work
  • U-M Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Event
    Historical Marker Dedication
    DATE: Thursday, October 14th
    TIME: 10:30 - 10:45 AM
    LOCATION: in front of the U-M Museum of Art
    More information
  • U-M Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Event
    Second Ceremony on Michigan Union steps in the commemoration of the 50th anniversary of JFK’s speech that led to the creation of the Peace Corps
    DATE: Thursday, October 14th
    TIME: 11:00 AM - 12 noon
    LOCATION: Michigan Union steps
    More information
  • Nourish Yourself:
    Making Peace with Yourself: Tackling self-esteem and body image issues
    Nourish YourSELF: A lunch series for women of color sponsored by MESA and the office of Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) invites ALL University of Michigan women of color—undergraduate, graduate, faculty, and staff—to engage in meaningful dialogue around issues of empowerment, health and wellness, identity, spirituality, sexuality, body image, media representation, and other relevant issues. To subscribe to the Nourish listserv contact Deise (dbenitez@umich.edu).
    DATE: Thursday, October 14th
    TIME: 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: MSA Chambers, Michigan Union
    SPONSOR: Multi-Ethnic Student Affairs
    CONTACT: dbenitez@umich.edu
  • CJS Noon Lecture: "Michizane and Tenjin: The Illustrated Version," Robert Borgen
    This talk is an update of research that began when the speaker was a Ph.D. candidate at Michigan. The research eventually led to the book, Sugawara no Michizane and the Early Heian Court, first published in 1986. Michizane (845-903) was a key literary and intellectual figure who also rose to high office but came to be viewed as a threat to established powers. He was slandered and died in exile. The misfortunes that subsequently befell his political rivals were blamed on his vengeful ghost and so, in the mid-tenth century, he was posthumously deified. To this day, he is popularly worshiped as Tenjin, a sort of patron saint of examination takers. The book focused on the historical figure, Michizane. Since its publication, the speakers has occasionally returned to the topic to fill in details concerning Tenjin worship. Most recently, the research has looked at art associated with the cult, and that will be the focus of this talk.
    DATE: Thursday, October 14th
    TIME: 12 noon - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: Room 1636, School of Social Work Building, 1080 South University, Ann Arbor
    SPONSOR: Center for Japanese Studies
  • U-M Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Event
    Special outdoor screening of A Passing of the Torch immediately before the commemoration of Senator John F. Kennedy’s inspiring late night speech on the steps of the Michigan Union on October 14, 1960.
    DATE: Thursday, October 14th
    TIME: 1:00 - 2:00 AM
    LOCATION: Michigan Union steps
    More information
  • U-M Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Event
    First Ceremony on Michigan Union steps in the commemoration of the 50th anniversary of JFK’s speech that led to the creation of the Peace Corps
    DATE: Thursday, October 14th
    TIME: 2:00 - 2:30 AM
    LOCATION: Michigan Union steps
    More information
  • U-M Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Event
    Spending Your Days in Ghana: Responding to JFK's Challenge
    DATE: Thursday, October 14th
    TIME: 1:30 - 5:00 PM
    LOCATION: Pendleton Room, Michigan Union
    More information
  • U-M Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Event
    Reception for U-M Returned Peace Corps Volunteers (RPCVs)
    DATE: Thursday, October 14th
    TIME: 4:30 - 6:00 PM
    LOCATION: Anderson Room, Michigan Union
    More information
  • U-M Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Event
    Peace Corps Director Aaron Williams: Inspiring the Next Generation of Volunteers
    DATE: Thursday, October 14th
    TIME: 6:30 - 7:30 PM
    LOCATION: Kuenzel Room, Michigan Union
    More information
  • U-M Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Event
    Tom Hayden: The Importance of Community Organizing: From the Peace Corps to Barack Obama
    DATE: Thursday, October 14th
    TIME: 8:30 - 10:00 PM
    LOCATION: Hatcher Graduate Library, Library Gallery (Room 100)
    More information

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October 15, 2010 - Friday

  • A Roundtable on Native American Culture, Gender & Healing
    DATES: Thursday, October 14th through Friday, October 15th
    The events are free and open to the public.
    MORE INFORMATION
    SPONSORS: Fetzer Institute, Native American Studies Program, Office of the Provost, Department of Psychology, UM's National Center for Institutional Diversity (NCID), Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research (MICHR), and School of Social Work
  • U-M Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Event
    History of the Peace Corps: From the Michigan Union Steps to the Present
    This dynamic exhibit showcases the unique role of University of Michigan students and faculty in the creation and popularizing of the Peace Corps. As Sargent Shriver said, "It might still be just an idea but for…those Michigan students and faculty." The exhibit highlights the development of student activism as well as important historical events.
    DATE: Friday, October 15th
    TIME: 1:00 - 2:00 PM
    LOCATION: Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library (Room 100)
    SPONSOR: University Library
    More information
  • U-M Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Event
    Peace Corps Authors
    DATE: Friday, October 15th
    TIME: 3:00 - 4:30 PM
    LOCATION: Hatcher Graduate Library, Library Gallery (Room 100)
    More information
  • U-M Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Event
    Engineers in the Peace Corps: A Conversation with College of Engineering Alumni
    DATE: Friday, October 15th
    TIME: 3:00 - 5:00 PM
    LOCATION: Chesebrough Auditorium, Chrysler Center (North Campus)
    More information
  • U-M Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Event
    U-M Alumni/Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Exhibition, October 15-November 12
    DATE: Opening reception, October 15, 6-9 PM at Slusser Gallery
    LOCATION: Slusser Gallery in the Art & Architecture Building on North Campus
    More information
  • New Metropolitan Studies and the Long Civil Rights Movement 2010-2011
    Distinguished Faculty/Graduate Student Seminar
    Khalil Muhammad's "Condemnation of Blackness" with the author in attendance. (Also: Heather Thompson's "Why Mass Incarceration Matters: Rethinking Crisis, Decline and Transformation in Postwar American History")
    DATE: Friday, October 15th
    TIME: 2:00 - 4:00 PM
    LOCATION: 4701 Haven Hall
    SPONSOR: Center for AfroAmerican and African Studies (CAAS)
    CONTACT: (734) 764-5513
  • U-M Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Event
    Happy Hour for RPCVs and Their Families and Friends
    DATE: Friday, October 15th
    TIME: 5:00 - 7:00 PM
    LOCATION: Dominick’s on Monroe Street
    More information
  • CJS Fall 2010 Film Series: Re-Viewing Kurosawa
    In the 1950s, Akira Kurosawa (1910-1998) led Japanese cinema onto the world stage, astonishing viewers with the emotional depth and the technical adroitness of his films. On the centennial of his birth, this series provides a once-in-a-generation chance to see Kurosawa's classics again—including his incomparable early samurai films—in fresh, new 35mm prints. Free and open to the public.
        Movie: Throne of Blood
    1957 / 109 min. / 35mm / In Japanese with English subtitles.
    Kurosawa's savage and unrestrained adaptation of Shakespeare's Macbeth, set in medieval Japan, plunges viewers into an eerie, fog-shrouded world of madness and obsession. It is often considered the finest Shakespeare adaptation in the history of cinema.
    DATE: Friday, October 15th
    TIME: 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
    LOCATION: Askwith Auditorium, Lorch Hall, 611 Tappan Street, Ann Arbor
    SPONSOR: Center for Japanese Studies
    CONTACT: (734) 764-6307 or umcjs@umich.edu

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October 16, 2010 - Saturday

  • U-M Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Event
    Football Game and Halftime Program
    DATE: Saturday, October 16th
    LOCATION: Michigan Stadium
    More information

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October 18, 2010 - Monday

  • Partners of Transfolk
    The Spectrum Center is excited to announce our new Partners of Transfolk Support Group. This is a bi-weekly open forum drop-in group to provide support and community for people of all genders to discuss and explore their relationships with trans-identified or gender non-conforming individuals in a safe environment. Group is open to people currently or formerly in partnerships with trans-people. The group will meet on the first and third Mondays of the month in the Spectrum Center, which is located at 3200 Michigan Union (3rd Floor), 530 South State Street, Ann Arbor. If you have any questions please contact partnersoftransfolk@umich.edu. DATE: Monday, October 4th
    TIME: 6:00 - 7:30 PM
    LOCATION: 3200, Michigan Union
    SPONSOR: Spectrum Center
    CONTACT: partnersoftransfolk@umich.edu

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October 20, 2010 - Wednesday

  • Movie: La Misma Luna (Under the Same Moon)
    Riggen, 2007, 106 min, PG-13
    Viewing, discussion, and food.
    Plot: A young Mexican boy travels to the U.S, to find his mother after his grandmother passes away.
    Hispanic Heritage Month Event
    DATE: Wednesday, October 20th
    TIME: 7:00 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan League, Michigan Room
    SPONSORS: MIRA, UUAP & HHM

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October 21, 2010 - Thursday

  • Myth and Counter-Myth in Early Modern Japan
    William Bodiford, Professor, Asian Languages & Cultures, UCLA
    DATE: Thursday, October 21st
    TIME: 12 noon
    LOCATION: Room 1636, School of Social Work Building (1080 S. University, Ann Arbor)
    SPONSOR: Center for Japanese Studies
    CONTACT: (734) 764-6307 or umcjs@umich.edu
  • Daniel Alarcón Fiction Reading
    DATE: Thursday, October 21st
    TIME: 5:15 - 6:00 PM
    LOCATION: U-M Museum of Art (UMMA), Helmut Stern Auditorium
    SPONSORS: English Language & Literature: MFA Program in Creative Writing, Zell Visiting Writers Series
    Daniel Alarcón is the author of two story collections, and the novel Lost City Radio, winner of the 2009 International Literature Prize given by the House of World Cultures in Berlin. His fiction and nonfiction have appeared in Harper's, The New Yorker, Granta, and the Virginia Quarterly Review. He is Associate Editor of Etiqueta Negra, an award-winning magazine published in his native Lima, Peru, and a Visiting Scholar at the UC Berkeley Center for Latin American Studies.
  • LGBT Student Organization Roundtable
    LGBT Student Organization Roundtable was kicked off last fall in order to bring cohesiveness to the more than 20 LGBTQ-related undergraduate and graduate student organizations planning programs across campus throughout the year. This group is facilitated by a Spectrum Center staff member and meets on the third Thursday of each month in the Spectrum Center. If your student organization is interested in networking, collaborating, and being a part of a wider movement of LGBTQ student organizations, please email Ariana Bostian-Kentes at abostian@umich.edu to be added to the listserv.
    DATE: Thursday, October 21st
    TIME: 6:00 - 7:00 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan Union
    SPONSOR: Spectrum Center
    CONTACT: Gabe Javier, (734) 763-4186 or spectrumcenter@umich.edu

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October 22, 2010 - Friday

  • CJS Fall 2010 Film Series: Re-Viewing Kurosawa
    In the 1950s, Akira Kurosawa (1910-1998) led Japanese cinema onto the world stage, astonishing viewers with the emotional depth and the technical adroitness of his films. On the centennial of his birth, this series provides a once-in-a-generation chance to see Kurosawa's classics again—including his incomparable early samurai films—in fresh, new 35mm prints. Free and open to the public.
        Movie: Hidden Fortress
    Kurosawa / 1958 / 139 min. / 35mm / In Japanese with English subtitles
    Lured by gold, two greedy peasants escort a man and woman across enemy lines. However, they do not realize that their companions are actually a princess and her general.
    DATE: Friday, October 22nd
    TIME: 7:00 - 9:30 PM
    LOCATION: Askwith Auditorium, Lorch Hall (611 Tappan Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109)
    SPONSOR: Center for Japanese Studies
    CONTACT: (734) 764-6307 or umcjs@umich.edu

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October 25, 2010 - Monday

  • Investing in Ability Week Events
    All events are free, open to the public and held in accessible locations. Accommodations are available by contacting disability@umich.edu
    DATE: Monday, October 25th
    • Dogs, dogs, dogs…and how they help!
      Meet service, assistance, and therapy dogs (and pups in training).
      See Tuesday, Oct. 26 for other locations.
      TIME: 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM
      2 LOCATIONS: University Hospital Towsley Triangle,
      East Ann Arbor Health Center, 4260 Plymouth Rd
    • PTSD & TBI: The Invisible Wounds of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom
      Mark Sutton and Douglas Williams
      A presentation by law enforcement and military veterans developed to help explore the issues and concerns of today’s returning veterans. A great starting point for departments and, in particular, first responders as they develop their strategies to address a growing health and social issue within our communities.
      TIME: 1:00 - 2:30 PM
      LOCATION: MCHC Auditorium (C.S. Mott Children's Hospital, level 2)
      A free, 2 hour presentation sponsored by the American Legion
    • Lioness (captioned film - 83 minutes)
      A compelling documentary that gives an inside look at the first women in U.S. history to engage in ground combat. Free admission.
      TIME: 2:30 - 4:30 PM
      LOCATION: MCHC Auditorium (C.S. Mott Children's Hospital, level 2)
    • Dedication of the James Edward Knox Adaptive Technology Computing Center
      Conducted by Paul Courant, University Librarian and Dean of Libraries. Followed by an Open House at the Center until 5:00 PM. Everyone is welcome.
      TIME: 3:30 - 5:00 PM
      LOCATION: Room 1128 on the 1st floor, Harold Shapiro Undergraduate Library
    IAW is presented by the University of Michigan Council for Disability Concerns in collaboration with the University of Michigan Health System and the Ann Arbor Center for Independent Living.
  • Auschwitz in the 21st Century
    Lecture: Piotr Cywinski
    DATE: Monday, October 25th
    TIME: 4:00 - 5:00 PM
    LOCATION: International Institute, Room 1636
    SPONSOR: The Frankel Center for Judaic Studies
    CONTACT: judaicstudies@umich.edu
  • Yusef Komunyakaa in Residence
    Poetry Reading & Public Reception
    DATE: Monday, October 25th
    TIME: 5:15 - 6:00 PM
    LOCATION: U-M Museum of Art (UMMA), Helmut Stern Auditorium
    SPONSORS: English Language & Literature: MFA Program in Creative Writing, Zell Visiting Writers Series
    Yusef Komunyakaa's numerous books of poems include Talking Dirty to the Gods, Thieves of Paradise, which was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, Neon Vernacular: New & Selected Poems 1977-1989, for which he received the Pulitzer Prize and the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award; Magic City, Dien Cai Dau, which won The Dark Room Poetry Prize, I Apologize for the Eyes in My Head, winner of the San Francisco Poetry Center Award, and Copacetic. He also co-edited The Jazz Poetry Anthology and co-translated The Insomnia of Fire by Nguyen Quang Thieu. His honors include the William Faulkner Prize from the Universite Rennes, the Thomas Forcade Award, the Hanes Poetry Prize, fellowships from the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, the Louisiana Arts Council, and the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Bronze Star for his service in Vietnam, where he served as a correspondent and managing editor of the Southern Cross. In 1999, he was elected a Chancellor of The Academy of American Poets. Yusef Komunyakaa is the Senior Distinguished Poet in the Graduate Writing Program at NYU.
    Public reception to follow in the UMMA Forum.

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October 26, 2010 - Tuesday

  • Investing in Ability Week Events
    All events are free, open to the public and held in accessible locations. Accommodations are available by contacting disability@umich.edu
    DATE: Tuesday, October 26th
    • Dogs, dogs, dogs…and how they help!
      Meet service, assistance, and therapy dogs (and pups in training).
      See Tuesday, Oct. 25 for other locations.
      TIME: 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM
      2 LOCATIONS: Diag (in front of Hatcher Library, 920 N. University)
      Conf. Rm. 5, KMS Place, 3621 S. State St.
    • PTSD & TBI: The Invisible Wounds of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom
      Mark Sutton and Douglas Williams
      A presentation by law enforcement and military veterans developed to help explore the issues and concerns of today’s returning veterans. A great starting point for departments and, in particular, first responders as they develop their strategies to address a growing health and social issue within our communities.
      TIME: 1:30 - 3:00 PM
      LOCATION: Kipke Conference Center, Campus Safety Services Building, 1239 Kipke Dr.
      A free, 2 hour presentation sponsored by the American Legion
    • First Days: (dis)Ability in the Classroom
      CRLT (Center for Research on Learning and Teaching) Players depict issues, stereotypes, and dynamics about visible and hidden disabilities in the classroom. Veteran scenario included. Free, but please register at: crlt.seminar@umich.edu
      TIME: 3:30 - 5:30 PM
      LOCATION: Palmer Commons, Great Lakes North Room, 4th floor, 100 Washtenaw Ave.
    • Music Within (captioned film)
      The true story of Richard Pimentel, a brilliant speaker with a troubled past. He returns from a tour of duty in Vietnam, his hearing severely impaired, and finds true purpose and meaning in his life working on behalf of Americans with disabilities. Free admission.
      TIME: 7:00 - 8:30 PM
      LOCATION: Michigan Theater, 603 E. Liberty St, Ann Arbor
    IAW is presented by the University of Michigan Council for Disability Concerns in collaboration with the University of Michigan Health System and the Ann Arbor Center for Independent Living.
  • The Bitter Taste of Success: Gendered Politics in Israel
    Lecture: Sarai Aharoni, Bar-Ilan University
    DATE: Tuesday, October 26th
    TIME: 4:00 - 5:00 PM
    LOCATION: 202 S. Thayer St., Room 2022
    SPONSOR: The Frankel Center for Judaic Studies
    CONTACT: (734) 763-9047 or judaicstudies@umich.edu
  • U-M Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Event
    Film Series: International Development Issues-Four Countries
    Taking Root: The Vision of Wangari Maathai

    DATE: Tuesday, October 26th
    TIME: 8:00 PM
    LOCATION: North Quad Dining Hall
    More information
  • Movie: 9500 Liberty
    Byler & Park, 2009, USA:81 min, Documentary
    Prince William County, Virginia becomes ground zero in Americas explosive battle over immigration policy when elected officials adopt a law requiring police officers to question anyone they have "probable cause" to suspect is an undocumented immigrant.
    Hispanic Heritage Month Event
    DATE: Tuesday, October 26th
    TIME: TBD
    LOCATION: TBD
    SPONSORS: Lambda Theta Phi
    CONTACT: rubensaa@umich.edu

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Investing in Ability Week 2010


October 27, 2010 - Wednesday

  • U-M Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Event
    Swords into Plowshares: Peace Corps Service in Eastern Europe and Eurasia
    DATE: Wednesday, October 27th
    TIME: 12 noon - 1:30 PM
    LOCATION: 1636 International Institute/School of Social Work Building
    More information
  • Investing in Ability Week Events
    All events are free, open to the public and held in accessible locations. Accommodations are available by contacting disability@umich.edu
    DATE: Tuesday, October 26th
    • Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Panel
      A panel of medical specialists, including the team from the Polytrauma/TBI Clinic in Ann Arbor, will discuss TBI and our local system of care, including evaluation process, treatment methods, and overall issues impacting returning veterans. They will also discuss the impact of traumatic brain injury on the family.
      TIME: 9:00 - 11:15 AM
      LOCATION: 2903 Taubman Medical Library (2nd floor, 2 levels below street level)
    • Lioness (captioned film - 83 minutes)
      A compelling documentary that gives an inside look at the first women in U.S. history to engage in ground combat. Free admission.
      TIME: 12 noon - 1:30 PM
      LOCATION: The Gallery, Room 100, Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library
    • John W. Quinn - Someone Like Me, An Unlikely Story of Challenge and Triumph Over Cerebral Palsy
      Introduction by Dr. Edward Hurvitz, Chair, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
      In the book "Someone Like Me, An Unlikely Story of Challenge and Triumph Over Cerebral Palsy," John W. Quinn describes what it is like to live with a handicap—a life filled with pain, laughter and love. John retired at the age of forty after a highly successful twenty-year career in a major corporation: the United States Navy. He did it all while keeping his condition a complete secret out of a deep desire to be treated just like everyone else. Book signing after presentation.
      TIME: 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
      LOCATION: The Gallery, Room 100, Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library
    • Panel of Veterans from Expressive Writing Workshop
      Showcase of veterans from the Ann Arbor VA Healthcare system, sharing their stories contributing to their recovery. Introduction by peer facilitator Ryan Christman and Dr. C. Beau Nelson, Ann Arbor VA Mental Health Recovery Coordinator—both U.S. Air Force veterans. Audience participation and Q&A.
      TIME:
      LOCATION:
    IAW is presented by the University of Michigan Council for Disability Concerns in collaboration with the University of Michigan Health System and the Ann Arbor Center for Independent Living.

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October 28, 2010 - Thursday

  • Whither Japan's Invisible Civil Society?"
    Patricia Steinhoff, Professor, Sociology, University of Hawaii
    DATE: Thursday, October 28th
    TIME: 12 noon
    LOCATION: Room 1636, School of Social Work Building (1080 S. University, Ann Arbor)
    SPONSOR: Center for Japanese Studies
    CONTACT: (734) 764-6307 or umcjs@umich.edu
  • Communism, Publishing, and Paths to Polishness in Postwar Warsaw: A Case Study
    Lecture: Karen Auerbach
    DATE: Thursday, October 28th
    TIME: 12 noon - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: Alumni Center, Rooms A & B, 200 Fletcher
    SPONSOR: Frankel Center for Judaic Studies
    CONTACT: (734) 763-9047 or judaicstudies@umich.edu
  • Investing in Ability Week Events
    All events are free, open to the public and held in accessible locations. Accommodations are available by contacting disability@umich.edu
    DATE: Thursday, October 28th
    • Second Life (SL) and the use of Virtual World Environments to Support Veterans
      Alice Krueger (SL avatar name "Gentle Heron") and Patricia F. Anderson
      People interested in disability and veteran and related issues socialize, connect and create using free voice and text chat in a free 3D virtual world. Many resources for disabled veterans are available in SL.
      A recent development is AVESS, the Amputee Virtual Environment Support Space, funded by Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center (TATRC), US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command.
      TIME: 2:30 - 3:30 PM
      LOCATION: Danto Auditorium, UMHS Cardiovascular Center
    • Taking Care of Our American Heroes: Past, Present and Future (CEU applied for)
      Brigadier General Carol Ann Fausone
      Assistant Adjutant General of Veterans Affairs
      Department of Military and Veterans Affairs, State of Michigan
      Looking at the benefits and opportunities for our Veterans and their families. Learning how to navigate the systems to meet their needs. Exploring the health care challenges for Veterans. Learning what you can do to make a difference for all Veterans health and well being.
      TIME: 3:30 - 5:00 PM
      LOCATION: Danto Auditorium, UMHS Cardiovascular Center
    • Taking Care of Our American Heroes and Their Families: Past, Present and Future (CEU applied for)
      Brigadier General Carol Ann Fausone
      Assistant Adjutant General of Veterans Affairs
      Department of Military and Veterans Affairs, State of Michigan
      Looking at the benefits and opportunities for our Veterans and their families. Learning how to navigate the systems to meet their needs. Exploring the health care challenges for Veterans. Learning what you can do to make a difference for all Veterans health and well being.
      TIME: 7:00 - 8:30 PM
      LOCATION: Ann Arbor District Library, 343 S. Fifth Avenue
    IAW is presented by the University of Michigan Council for Disability Concerns in collaboration with the University of Michigan Health System and the Ann Arbor Center for Independent Living.
  • U-M Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Event
    Sarah Chayes: Penny W. Stamps Distinguished Speaker Series
    DATE: Thursday, October 28th
    TIME: 5:10 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan Theater
    More information
  • Yusef Komunyakaa in Residence
    Poetry Reading & Public Reception
    DATE: Thursday, October 28th
    TIME: 5:15 - 6:00 PM
    LOCATION: U-M Museum of Art (UMMA), Helmut Stern Auditorium
    SPONSORS: English Language & Literature: MFA Program in Creative Writing, Zell Visiting Writers Series
    Yusef Komunyakaa's numerous books of poems include Talking Dirty to the Gods, Thieves of Paradise, which was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, Neon Vernacular: New & Selected Poems 1977-1989, for which he received the Pulitzer Prize and the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award; Magic City, Dien Cai Dau, which won The Dark Room Poetry Prize, I Apologize for the Eyes in My Head, winner of the San Francisco Poetry Center Award, and Copacetic. He also co-edited The Jazz Poetry Anthology and co-translated The Insomnia of Fire by Nguyen Quang Thieu. His honors include the William Faulkner Prize from the Universite Rennes, the Thomas Forcade Award, the Hanes Poetry Prize, fellowships from the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, the Louisiana Arts Council, and the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Bronze Star for his service in Vietnam, where he served as a correspondent and managing editor of the Southern Cross. In 1999, he was elected a Chancellor of The Academy of American Poets. Yusef Komunyakaa is the Senior Distinguished Poet in the Graduate Writing Program at NYU.
    Public reception to follow in the UMMA Forum.
  • Friends of Dorothy: Oz's Legacy to the LGBTQ Community
    Judy Garland's portrayal of Dorothy Gale helped make her a gay icon and "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" became the gay anthem—a yearning for a home far away from the small-town provincialism of a black-and-white existence. Audience members will join panelists in discussing the historical and ongoing legacy of the OZ books and movies for the shaping of the LGBTQ psyche.
    Special guests include Professors David Halperin (W.H. Auden Collegiate Professor of the History and Theory of Sexuality) and Nadine Hubbs (Undergraduate Director of Women's Studies).
    DATE: Thursday, October 28th
    TIME: 7:00 - 9:00 PM
    LOCATION: East Quadrangle
    SPONSOR: Spectrum Center
    CONTACT: (734) 763-4186 or spectrumcenter@umich.edu

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October 29, 2010 - Friday

  • Investing in Ability Week Events
    All events are free, open to the public and held in accessible locations. Accommodations are available by contacting disability@umich.edu
    DATE: Tuesday, October 26th
    • James T. Neubacher Award and Certificates of Appreciation Presentation Ceremony
      Presentation of Certificates of Appreciation followed by Neubacher Award presented by Regent Julia Darlow. Refreshments at 9:30 AM.
      TIME: 10:00 AM - 12 noon
      LOCATION: Rackham Building, Assembly Hall 4th floor, 915 E. Washington
    • Army-Navy Wheelchair Basketball Game
      James T. Neubacher Annual Tip-Off Event
      The event features an Army Color Guard national anthem, Michigan Dance Team halftime performance and pre-game performance by the 338th Army band.
      Transportation provided (see website)
      ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND!
      TIME: 7:30 PM
      LOCATION: Saline High School Gymnasium, 1300 Campus Pkwy., Saline, MI 48176
    IAW is presented by the University of Michigan Council for Disability Concerns in collaboration with the University of Michigan Health System and the Ann Arbor Center for Independent Living.
  • CJS Fall 2010 Film Series: Re-Viewing Kurosawa
    In the 1950s, Akira Kurosawa (1910-1998) led Japanese cinema onto the world stage, astonishing viewers with the emotional depth and the technical adroitness of his films. On the centennial of his birth, this series provides a once-in-a-generation chance to see Kurosawa's classics again—including his incomparable early samurai films—in fresh, new 35mm prints. Free and open to the public.
        Movie: High and Low
    1963 / 143 min. / 35mm / In Japanese with English subtitles.
    An executive of a shoe company becomes a victim of extortion when his chauffeur's son is kidnapped and held for ransom.
    DATE: Friday, October 29th
    TIME: 7:00 - 9:30 PM
    LOCATION: Askwith Auditorium, Lorch Hall (611 Tappan Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109)
    SPONSOR: Center for Japanese Studies
    CONTACT: (734) 764-6307 or umcjs@umich.edu

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November 1, 2010 - Monday

  • Indivisible: An Anthology of Contemporary South Asian American Poetry
    To celebrate the first anthology of its kind, we bring you the work of American poets who trace their roots to Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. These poems take us from basketball courts to Bollywood, from Hindu-Muslim riots in India to antiimmigrant attacks on the streets of post-9/11 America. Discussion with poets Neelanjana Banerjee, Sejal Shah and Faisal Mohyuddin —three poets featured in this anthology facilitated by PhD candidate Manan Desai, at 4 pm. Reading by poets begins at 5 pm.
    DATE: Monday, November 1st
    TIME: 4:00 - 7:00 PM
    LOCATION: Angell Hall, Room 3222, 435 S. State St, Ann Arbor, MI
    CONTACT: Zilka Joseph, ziljos@umich.edu
  • Multicultural Taste Fest
    Join us for an event to celebrate the cultural diversity of Ann Arbor's cuisines! A dozen local restaurants will be preparing a sampling of their menu for you to enjoy. Space is limited.
    *Pre-registration is required.*
    DATE: Monday, November 1st
    TIME: 5:00 - 6:15 PM
    LOCATION: East Lounge, 2nd floor, Rackham Building
    Register now!

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November 2, 2010 - Tuesday

  • U-M Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Event
    Provost's Seminar on Educating Globally Competent Students
    DATE: Tuesday, November 2nd
    TIME: 1:00 - 5:00 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan League
    More information
  • U-M Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Event
    Film Series: International Development Issues-Four Countries:
    End of the Rainbow

    DATE: Tuesday, November 2nd
    TIME: 8:00 PM
    LOCATION: North Quad Dining Hall
    More information

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November 3, 2010 - Wednesday

  • Bate Papo Series: O olhar do turista afro-americano sobre o Brasil
    Brazil has increasingly become a travel destination for African American tourists interested in African culture and seeking to engage with other black communities in the diaspora. But how has this specific tourist gaze been shaped? What sources have informed the construction of this particular view of the country? Analyzing the dominant African American tourist gaze on Brazil, Patricia de Santana Pinho demonstrates how tourism publicity geared to African Americans has represented Bahia as abounding with cultural roots and Africanness, in contrast to Caribbean destinations which have predominantly been portrayed as sites where one travels for fun, sun, sand, and sex. Pinho looks at these seemingly opposite representations as constituting a "map of Africanness" where the meanings of the different places visited by African American tourists are hierarchically connected.
    DATE: Wednesday, November 3rd
    TIME: 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
    LOCATION: Room 1644 School of Social Work Building, 1080 South University Avenue
    SPONSOR: International Social Work Student Association, the Office of Student Services and the Office of Field Instruction
    CONTACT: Lenny Urena, lurena@umich.edu
  • S.U.R.E. (Strength, Understanding, Respect, Empowerment) For Graduate Students of Color
    This group will serve as a safe and supportive environment where students of color can address issues related to academic, personal, and professional life. Group members, along with facilitators, will help guide the focus of the group so as to address the needs of the members. The goal of this group is to promote well-being through Strength, Understanding, Respect, and Empowerment (SURE). Group membership and content is confidential.
    Pre-group meeting with counselor required. E-mail the group leader at sandrapi@umich.edu to schedule a brief meeting.
    DATE: Wednesday, November 3rd (ongoing)
    TIME: 2:00 - 3:30 PM
    LOCATION: n/a
    SPONSORS: Co-sponsored by Counseling and Psychological Services.

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November 4, 2010 - Thursday

  • U-M Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Event
    Advancing Global Public Health: Presentation of the Thomas Francis, Jr. Medal
    DATE: Thursday, November 4th
    TIME: 2:00 - 4:00 PM
    LOCATION: Ross School of Business, Blau Auditorium
    A reception follows.
    More information
  • Reimagined, Captured, and Framed: History in Kurosawa's 'Period Pieces'
    Hitomi Tonomura - CJS Noon Lecture

    Professor, History / Women's Studies, The University of Michigan; "Reimagined, Captured, and Framed: History in Kurosawa's 'Period Pieces'" (This lecture is part of a series that corresponds with CJS's fall film series, "Re-viewing Kurosawa.")
    DATE: Thursday, November 4th
    TIME: 12:00 - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: Room 1636, School of Social Work Building (1080 S. University, Ann Arbor)
    CONTACT: 734.764.6307 umcjs@umich.edu
  • Unsettling Language: Jewish Lingualisms in Global Contexts
    If, as many have argued, polyglotism and linguistic mixture are inherent to the history of Jewish communities, then recent studies of multilingualism, vernaculars, non-dominant languages, translation, language revival/extinction require far greater attention to these elements of less studied languages of Jewish life. These idioms include those that traditionally identified as "Jewish" hybrid speech forms, such as Ladino, Yiddish, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, and many others, as well as those traditionally viewed as "non-Jewish," including Spanish, Turkish, Greek, Arabic, Russian and so on.
    This two-day event will bring noted scholars together for a series of presentations and conversations on Jewish history and culture in several languages. Each invited scholar will present a brief talk based on original research that responds to questions and concepts raised by heterodox Jewish language practices, their cultural contexts, and political implications.
    DATE: Thursday, November 4th
    TIME: 4:00 PM - 9:00 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan League
    This two-day event will bring noted scholars together for a series of presentations and conversations on Jewish history and culture in several languages. Each invited scholar will present a brief talk based on original research that responds to questions and concepts raised by heterodox Jewish language practices, their cultural contexts, and political implications.
    CONTACT: JudaicStudies@umich.edu

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November 5, 2010 - Friday

  • Unsettling Language: Jewish Lingualisms in Global Contexts
    If, as many have argued, polyglotism and linguistic mixture are inherent to the history of Jewish communities, then recent studies of multilingualism, vernaculars, non-dominant languages, translation, language revival/extinction require far greater attention to these elements of less studied languages of Jewish life. These idioms include those that traditionally identified as "Jewish" hybrid speech forms, such as Ladino, Yiddish, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, and many others, as well as those traditionally viewed as "non-Jewish," including Spanish, Turkish, Greek, Arabic, Russian and so on.
    This two-day event will bring noted scholars together for a series of presentations and conversations on Jewish history and culture in several languages. Each invited scholar will present a brief talk based on original research that responds to questions and concepts raised by heterodox Jewish language practices, their cultural contexts, and political implications.
    DATE: Thursday, November 4th
    TIME: 4:00 PM - 9:00 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan League
    This two-day event will bring noted scholars together for a series of presentations and conversations on Jewish history and culture in several languages. Each invited scholar will present a brief talk based on original research that responds to questions and concepts raised by heterodox Jewish language practices, their cultural contexts, and political implications.
    CONTACT: JudaicStudies@umich.edu
  • CJS Fall 2010 Film Series: Re-Viewing Kurosawa
    In the 1950s, Akira Kurosawa (1910-1998) led Japanese cinema onto the world stage, astonishing viewers with the emotional depth and the technical adroitness of his films. On the centennial of his birth, this series provides a once-in-a-generation chance to see Kurosawa's classics again—including his incomparable early samurai films—in fresh, new 35mm prints. Free and open to the public.
        Movie: Yōjimbō
    1961 / 110 min. / 35mm / In Japanese with English subtitles.
    A crafty ronin comes to a town divided by two criminal gangs and decides to play them against each other to free the town.
    DATE: Friday, November 5th
    TIME: 7:00 - 9:30 PM
    LOCATION: Askwith Auditorium, Lorch Hall (611 Tappan Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109)
    SPONSOR: Center for Japanese Studies
    CONTACT: (734) 764-6307 or umcjs@umich.edu

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November 8, 2010 - Monday

  • Partners of Transfolk
    The Spectrum Center is excited to announce our new Partners of Transfolk Support Group. This is a bi-weekly open forum drop-in group to provide support and community for people of all genders to discuss and explore their relationships with trans-identified or gender non-conforming individuals in a safe environment. Group is open to people currently or formerly in partnerships with trans-people. The group will meet on the first and third Mondays of the month in the Spectrum Center, which is located at 3200 Michigan Union (3rd Floor), 530 South State Street, Ann Arbor. If you have any questions please contact partnersoftransfolk@umich.edu.
    DATE: Monday, November 8th
    TIME: 6:00 PM - 7:30 AM
    LOCATION: Michigan Union, Room 3200
    SPONSOR: Spectrum Center
    CONTACT: Gabe Javier, 734 763-4186, spectrumcenter@umich.edu

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November 9, 2010 - Tuesday

  • My Brothers: An ongoing lunch series, self-identified men of color
    What does it mean to be a man of color at Michigan? Through reflections and discussion on this complex question, you will have a chance to express your experiences here at UofM and build connections with other brothers on campus. MY BROTHERS is a safe space open to all self-identified men of color at the University of Michigan.
    Lunch will be served followed by a speaker and small group discussion.
    DATE: Tuesday, November 9th
    TIME: 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan Union, MSA Chambers
    SPONSOR: Multi-Ethnic Student Affairs
    CONTACT: Kathleen Kirkland, 734 763-9044, kvk@umich.edu
  • Lecture: The Rescue of Children and Youths at Buchenwald
    Ken Waltzer, Michigan State University
    DATE: Tuesday, November 9th
    TIME: 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM
    LOCATION: 202 S. Thayer St., Room 2022
    CONTACT: JudaicStudies@umich.edu
  • U-M Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Event
    Film Series: International Development Issues-Four Countries:
    Poto Mitan

    DATE: Tuesday, November 9th
    TIME: 8:00 PM
    LOCATION: North Quad Dining Hall
    More information

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November 10, 2010 - Wednesday

  • LGBT Faculty, Staff and Student Reception
    Take a moment out of the busy fall semester to mix and mingle with other LGBT faculty, staff, and graduate students over light refreshments. This is a special opportunity for students to make connections with members of the Faculty Pride Pages (a U-M Kerberos login is required). A welcome will be offered from Rackham Graduate School and the Spectrum Center.
    Pre-registration is required.
    DATE: Wednesday, November 10th
    TIME: 5:00 - 6:30 PM
    LOCATION: East Conference Room, 4th floor, Rackham Building
    SPONSOR: Spectrum Center.
  • International Night 2010
    International Night has become a tradition within our school. It brings to gather community in sharing culture, traditions, food and entertainment. Mark your calendar! And please plan to join us. It will be an evening to remember. (Feel free to wear clothing that's representative for your homeland and/or another country)
    Please RSVP at ssw.ossrsvp@umich.edu
    DATE: Wednesday, November 10th
    TIME: 6:00 - 8:30 PM
    LOCATION: 1840 SSWB (Educational Conference Center)
    SPONSORS: International Social Work Student Association, the Office of Student Services and the Office of Field Instruction
    CONTACT: Elizabeth Kim, bethkim@umich.edu

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November 11, 2010 - Thursday

  • Nourish Yourself:
    Branding MySelf: Buying of Identity
    Nourish YourSELF: A lunch series for women of color sponsored by MESA and the office of Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) invites ALL University of Michigan women of color—undergraduate, graduate, faculty, and staff—to engage in meaningful dialogue around issues of empowerment, health and wellness, identity, spirituality, sexuality, body image, media representation, and other relevant issues. To subscribe to the Nourish listserv contact Deise (dbenitez@umich.edu).
    DATE: Thursday, November 11th
    TIME: 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: MSA Chambers, Michigan Union
    SPONSOR: Multi-Ethnic Student Affairs
    CONTACT: dbenitez@umich.edu
  • CJS Noon Lecture
    Past and Present: A Grand Unified Theory of Japanese History
    Carol Gluck, George Sansom Professor of History, Columbia University
    Japan often appears in the international media as a country that does not -- or even, cannot -- change. Despite endless talk of reform, nothing dramatic seems to happen. But different societies change in different ways, each with its own patterns. Here is a modestly titled "Grand Unified Theory of Japanese history," derived from the patterns of the past and then deployed to illuminate the changes in the present. The theory thus purports to explain how history happens in Japan.
    DATE: Thursday, November 11th
    TIME: 12 noon
    LOCATION: Room 1636, School of Social Work Building (1080 S. University, Ann Arbor)
    CONTACT: umcjs@umich.edu

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November 12, 2010 - Friday

  • Inequalities in India Conference
    In recent decades India's economy has grown at impressive rates and the country has made important technological advances, giving it a new and enhanced role on the global stage. This theme year examines the implications of the rapid changes for various kinds of inequality in Indian society. We will explore this theme and discuss the scholarly research during two conferences sponsored by the Trehan India Initiative.
    DATE: Friday, November 12th
    TIME: 2:00 - 6:00 PM
    LOCATION: Room 1636 School of Social Work Building, 1080 South University Avenue
    CONTACT: Zilka Joseph, ziljos@umich.edu
  • CJS Fall 2010 Film Series: Re-Viewing Kurosawa
    In the 1950s, Akira Kurosawa (1910-1998) led Japanese cinema onto the world stage, astonishing viewers with the emotional depth and the technical adroitness of his films. On the centennial of his birth, this series provides a once-in-a-generation chance to see Kurosawa's classics again—including his incomparable early samurai films—in fresh, new 35mm prints. Free and open to the public.
        Movie: Sanjurbō
    1962 / 96 min. / 35mm / In Japanese with English subtitles
    A crafty samurai helps a young man and his fellow clansmen save his uncle, who has been framed and imprisoned by a corrupt superintendent.
    DATE: Friday, November 12th
    TIME: 7:00 - 9:30 PM
    LOCATION: Askwith Auditorium, Lorch Hall (611 Tappan Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109)
    SPONSOR: Center for Japanese Studies
    CONTACT: (734) 764-6307 or umcjs@umich.edu

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November 14, 2010 - Sunday

  • LGBTQ Ally Training
    The LGBTQ Ally Training Program, started in 2005, seeks to empower members of the University community to be active allies to LGBTQ people. More than just a Safe Space program, the Ally Training Program uses a social justice framework to guide participants through a curriculum that bridges new knowledge of developmental theory to the lived experiences of LGBTQ and Ally-identified people.
    DATE: Sunday, November 14th
    TIME: 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan Union
    SPONSOR: Spectrum Center
    CONTACT: Gabe Javier, 734 763-4186, spectrumcenter@umich.edu
    More information

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November 16, 2010 - Tuesday

  • A Veteran Friendly Campus: Symposium on Student Veterans/Military
    Join fellow U-M Faculty and Staff in this one-day symposium as we discuss student veterans/military, what they bring to campus and how we can better serve their needs.
    DATE: Tuesday, November 16th
    TIME: 8:30 AM - 2:30 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan Union
    This event is open to all Faculty and Staff at the University of Michigan and special invited guests at no charge.
    Breakfast and lunch will be served!
    Registration and itinerary
  • U-M Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Event
    Film Series: International Development Issues-Four Countries:
    Once in Afghanistan

    DATE: Tuesday, November 16th
    TIME: 8:00 PM
    LOCATION: North Quad Dining Hall
    More information

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November 18, 2010 - Thursday

  • CJS Noon Lecture
    Beyond Site/Sight: Art and Disability in Japan and Michigan
    Sadashi Inuzuka, Professor, School of Art & Design, University of Michigan
    In Japan, art, notably ceramics, is a successful part of educational programs for people with disabilities. Additionally, the creative efforts of these individuals, particularly blind or visually impaired persons, are given wide public recognition through the commitment of an active network of forward thinking Japanese museums and galleries. As a ceramic artist who is also visual impaired Sadashi Inuzuka has been greatly inspired by Japanese educational initiatives for people with disabilities and has, since 1999, worked to adapt some of these Japanese educational models for people with visual and multiple impairments here in Ann Arbor and the Detroit area.
    In this talk, Sadashi Inuzuka will discuss his work in ceramics and how a gradual acceptance of his eye condition has shaped his art and life. Inuzuka will also talk about the dynamic art programming in Japan for people with disabilities, the recent Shigaraki Ceramic Triennale in which Detroit children's ceramics works were represented, his educational work with the visually and cognitively impaired youth and seniors, and future cultural exchanges between Shiga Prefecture, Japan and the state of Michigan.
    DATE: Thursday, November 18th
    TIME: 12:00 - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: Room 1636, School of Social Work Building, 1080 South University, Ann Arbor
    CONTACT: 734.764.6307, umcjs@umich.edu
  • Dos Pintele Yod: Hebrew Orthography, the Play of Ethics, and the Jewish Mystical Imagination
    Lecture, Elliott Ginsburg
    DATE: Thursday, November 18th
    TIME: 12:00 - 1:00 PM
    LOCATION: Almumni Center, Rooms A & B
    CONTACT: JudaicStudies@umich.edu
  • LGBT Student Organization Roundtable
    LGBT Student Organization Roundtable was kicked off last fall in order to bring cohesiveness to the more than 20 LGBTQ-related undergraduate and graduate student organizations planning programs across campus throughout the year. This group is facilitated by a Spectrum Center staff member and meets on the third Thursday of each month in the Spectrum Center. If your student organization is interested in networking, collaborating, and being a part of a wider movement of LGBTQ student organizations, please email Ariana Bostian-Kentes at abostian@umich.edu to be added to the listserv.
    DATE: Thursday, November 18th (ongoing)
    TIME: 6:00 - 7:30 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan Union, Room 3200
    SPONSOR: Spectrum Center
    CONTACT: Gabe Javier, 734 763-4186, spectrumcenter@umich.edu

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November 20, 2010 - Saturday

  • LGBT Saturdays
    Welcoming all members of the LGBT community at the University of Michigan to just hang out with friends in a safe, friendly, and non-pressuring and social scene on Saturdays! The group's activities vary, but they're held every Saturday during the school year and are open to everyone. Simply stop by, or spend the entire evening with us cooking, eating, playing games, and getting to know one another.
    DATE: Saturday, November 20th
    TIME: not specified
    LOCATION: Canterbury House, 721 E. Huron St
    CONTACT: Gabe Javier, 734 763-4186, spectrumcenter@umich.edu

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November 22, 2010 - Monday

  • Bate Papo Series: Enslavement and Freedom in 19th century Brazil and Uruguay
    A discussion with Keila Grinberg, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro
    This paper aims to discuss the process of delegitimisation of Brazilian slavery in the second half of the nineteenth century. Several reasons contributed to delegitimise the slave regime in Brazil, such as the end of the Atlantic slave trade, the rise of the average price of a slave and the growing number of manumissions. A large number of these manumissions were obtained through freedom suits, in which slaves brought lawsuits against their masters arguing in the courts that they had the right to be freed. The paper focuses specifically on the freedom suits initiated in the late 1860s on the border of Brazil with Uruguay. In these lawsuits, slaves argued that they were living in freedom in Uruguay and were re-enslaved by Brazilians.
    DATE: Monday, November 22nd
    TIME: 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
    LOCATION: Room 1644 School of Social Work Building, 1080 South University Avenue
    SPONSOR:
    CONTACT: Lenny Urena, lurena@umich.edu

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December 11, 2010 - Saturday

  • LGBT Saturdays
    All members of the LGBT community are welcome to hang out with friends in a safe, friendly social scene every Saturday during the school year. Simply stop by, or spend the evening cooking, eating, playing games, and getting to know one another.
    DATES: October 16, 2010 - April 23, 2011
    LOCATION: Canterbury House, 721 E Huron, Ann Arbor
    SPONSOR: Spectrum Center
    For more information, email lgbtsaturdays@umich.edu

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December 13, 2010 - Monday

  • Free & anonymous HIV testing
    Every Monday during the academic year, a counselor from HARC, the HIV/AIDS Resource Center, is at the Spectrum Center from 6-8 pm offering free and anonymous HIV testing. The Spectrum Center is a welcoming and safe space for all seeking testing. For more information on HARC and testing, call 800.578.2300, 734.572.9355, or visit them on the web at http://hivaidsresource.org/
    DATE: Monday, December 13th
    TIME: 6:00 - 8:00 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan Union, Spectrum Center, room 3200
    SPONSOR: Spectrum Center
    CONTACT: Gabe Javier, 734 763-4186 spectrumcenter@umich.edu
  • Gender Explorers
    A social and support group for transgender, transsexual, genderqueer, TG-questioning people and those who transgress gender binaries. This safe, open, and affirming space includes discussion, fellowship, and significant others.
    The group meets on the 2nd and 4th Monday of each month in the Spectrum Center. To participate and to learn more, email PJ at pajeho@umich.edu
    DATE: Monday, December 13th
    TIME: 6:00 - 8:00 PM
    LOCATION: Michigan Union, Spectrum Center, room 3200
    SPONSOR: Spectrum Center

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December 15, 2010 - Wednesday

  • Nuevo Rumbon
    Nuevo Rumbon is an Afro-Cuban jazz quartet featuring musicians Brian DiBlassio-piano, Kurt Krahnke-bass, Neeraj Mehta- congas and bata, and Jonathan Ovalle-drums. Their music is planted firmly in the contemporary Cuban tradition, paying homage to the great piano-driven bands of such artists as Gonzalo Rubalcaba, Danilo Perez, Michel Camilo, and the great Chucho Valdez. Aggressive percussion, thick montunos and a rock solid bass tumbao together create the explosive grooves of this fiery quartet. Members of Nuevo Rumbon have also been heard in concert with numerous other Afro-Cuban jazz and salsa ensembles, including Los Gatos, Tumbao Bravo, and Groupo Salvaje, and have been a featured group at Jazzloop 2007, as well as the Art Tatum Jazz Heritage Festival. Admission is free.
    DATE: Wednesday, December 15th
    TIME: 8:00 PM
    LOCATION: U-M Museum of Art, Forum
    SPONSOR: UMMA
    Each month at UMMA, enjoy an evening of exceptional jazz. This series presents outstanding local artists in an intimate setting, and is curated by UM Associate Professor Adam Unsworth. These events are made possible in part by the Katherine Tuck Endowment.

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December 18, 2010 - Saturday

  • LGBT Saturdays
    All members of the LGBT community are welcome to hang out with friends in a safe, friendly social scene every Saturday during the school year. Simply stop by, or spend the evening cooking, eating, playing games, and getting to know one another.
    DATES: October 16, 2010 - April 23, 2011
    LOCATION: Canterbury House, 721 E Huron, Ann Arbor
    SPONSOR: Spectrum Center
    For more information, email lgbtsaturdays@umich.edu

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December 20, 2010 - Monday

  • Partners of Transfolk
    The Spectrum Center is excited to announce our new Partners of Transfolk Support Group. This is a bi-weekly open forum drop-in group to provide support and community for people of all genders to discuss and explore their relationships with trans-identified or gender non-conforming individuals in a safe environment. Group is open to people currently or formerly in partnerships with trans-people. The group meets on the first and third Mondays of the month.
    DATE: Monday, December 13th
    TIME: 6:00 - 8:00 PM
    LOCATION: Spectrum Center, 3200 Michigan Union (3rd Floor), 530 South State Street, Ann Arbor
    SPONSOR: Spectrum Center
    CONTACT: partnersoftransfolk@umich.edu

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